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Some rivers were filthy. They
were polluted by rubbish, dyes
from the mills and sewage.
Some people took their drinking
wa...
The nightsoilmen were
employed to clear out the
cesspits. These were big
holes in the ground under
the privies (toilets). ...
Sewage from the cesspits
often leaked into the
water supply. The water
from the standpipe would
therefore be infected
with...
There were no
underground sewers.
Waste was either thrown
into gutters or flowed
straight into the rivers.
This water woul...
In 1831 a new epidemic
arrived – Cholera. This
disease could kill a person
in days. It is caused by a
germ that attacks th...
Up to six families
would share a house to
try and save on the
rent. Disease spread
easily in crowded
conditions.
People did not
understand the germ.
They thought disease
was spread by smells
and bad air. The germ
was not discovered
unt...
Builders wanted to make a
quick profit, and took
advantage of there being
no rules. The houses were
small, cheap with no
r...
Some of the worst houses
were built in terraces which
were joined to the house
behind. We call these backto-back houses. T...
More and more people
moved to the industrial
towns to work in the
factories and other
industry. The workers had
to live as...
Factory workers were poor.
They feared their rates
would go up if they
complained to the landlords
about the poor conditio...
At the time no one
expected the government
to help the poor.
Politicians thought they
should not interfere in
peoples live...
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Squalor in the street learning trail

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Squalor in the street learning trail

  1. 1. Some rivers were filthy. They were polluted by rubbish, dyes from the mills and sewage. Some people took their drinking water from the rivers. The woman in the picture is washing the sheets of a Cholera victim in the river. The symptoms of Cholera were severe vomiting and diarrhoea.
  2. 2. The nightsoilmen were employed to clear out the cesspits. These were big holes in the ground under the privies (toilets). The smells would be terrible but many landlords did not like paying the nightsoilmen.
  3. 3. Sewage from the cesspits often leaked into the water supply. The water from the standpipe would therefore be infected with disease. Over 100 people would share one toilet.
  4. 4. There were no underground sewers. Waste was either thrown into gutters or flowed straight into the rivers. This water would be used for drinking and cooking.
  5. 5. In 1831 a new epidemic arrived – Cholera. This disease could kill a person in days. It is caused by a germ that attacks the intestines and leads to vomiting, diarrhoea, fever, cramps and death. It is spread by dirty water.
  6. 6. Up to six families would share a house to try and save on the rent. Disease spread easily in crowded conditions.
  7. 7. People did not understand the germ. They thought disease was spread by smells and bad air. The germ was not discovered until 1867.
  8. 8. Builders wanted to make a quick profit, and took advantage of there being no rules. The houses were small, cheap with no running water, heating or ventilation.
  9. 9. Some of the worst houses were built in terraces which were joined to the house behind. We call these backto-back houses. The stone floors, single brick and poor roofing materials meant the houses were very damp and cold.
  10. 10. More and more people moved to the industrial towns to work in the factories and other industry. The workers had to live as close as possible to their place of work. There were no cars, buses or bicycles and people started work very early in the morning.
  11. 11. Factory workers were poor. They feared their rates would go up if they complained to the landlords about the poor conditions. Some people were so poor they lived below ground in the cellars of other people’s houses.
  12. 12. At the time no one expected the government to help the poor. Politicians thought they should not interfere in peoples lives. We call this attitude Laissezfaire.

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