City of Chicago’s Complete Streets Policy Graphic courtesy of European Commission:  Reclaiming City Streets for People / C...
<ul><li>Complete Streets policy </li></ul><ul><li>Targeted Traffic Teams (T-3) </li></ul><ul><li>Public awareness campaign...
What are “Complete Streets”? <ul><li>Complete Streets are designed, operated & maintained so they are safe, comfortable an...
Why Do We Need Complete Streets? <ul><li>Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Choice </li></ul><ul><li>Cost effective </li></ul><ul><l...
Pedestrian Safety <ul><li>2003 - 2007 averages: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>3,552 pedestrian crashes per year </li></ul></ul><ul...
Americans Want to Walk & Bike More 52% of Americans want to bike more than they currently do.
Americans Want to Walk & Bike More 55% of Americans would prefer to drive less and walk more.
Not All Trips are Auto-Trips <ul><li>Approximately 33% of Americans do not drive </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 30% of Chicagoan...
Bicycle Counts <ul><li>Wells at Chicago – Both Directions </li></ul><ul><li>Thursday, 7/24/03 (7-9 a.m.):  228 Bikes </li>...
Pedestrian Counts <ul><li>Bridges - South Branch of the Chicago River </li></ul><ul><li>Weekdays, 1999:  141,574 Pedestria...
Transit Ridership <ul><li>CTA Bus & Rail </li></ul><ul><li>2007:  499,867,709 Riders </li></ul><ul><li>2008:  524,930,958 ...
We Can Build Good Streets
We Can Build Accessible Streets
We Can Accommodate All Users During All Phases of a Project
We Can Promote a Land Use/Transportation Connection that Accommodates All Users
Yet Many Streets are Built Like This
Many Streets Are Not Complete Sidewalks & Crosswalks in Disrepair
Many Streets Are Not Complete Uninviting to Bicyclists
Many Streets Are Not Complete Difficult to Cross on Foot
Many Streets Are Not Complete Inaccessible
Many Streets Are Not Complete Construction Zones Create Unique Pedestrian Challenges
Many Streets Are Not Complete Construction Zones Create Unique Pedestrian Challenges
Many Developments are Auto-Centric
Complete Streets Policies Nationwide & Statewide  movement aimed at designing, operating & maintaining the entire right-of...
Nationwide Movement State County MPO City Legislation or  resolution OR, FL, RI, SC, MA, IL, CA, MD DuPage San Diego Jacks...
Nationwide Movement State County MPO City Legislation or  resolution OR, FL, RI, SC, MA, IL, CA, MD DuPage San Diego Jacks...
The Complete Streets Act of 2009 <ul><li>S. 584 / H.R. 1443 </li></ul><ul><li>Introduced March 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>DOTs...
Illinois Complete Streets Act (2007) <ul><li>Bicycle & Pedestrian Ways: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Should be considered in the ...
City of Chicago’s Complete Streets Policy (2006) <ul><li>“ The  safety  and  convenience  of  all  users of the transporta...
What Does Complete Streets Mean for Chicago? <ul><li>New approach to planning, design, construction & operation </li></ul>...
What Does Complete Streets Mean for Chicago? <ul><li>Implementation strategy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Operationalize” Compl...
What Does Complete Streets Mean for Chicago? <ul><li>Crosswalk right-of-way enforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Safe Routes to S...
What Does Complete Streets Mean for Chicago? <ul><li>Pedestrian Safety Action Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vision/Goal-setti...
Questions? City of Chicago’s Complete Streets Policy
 
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City of Chicago’s Complete Streets Policy (in search of total fabulousity)

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  • Accommodate ALL users, and 1) health, 2) physical activity, 3) environment, 4) reduce congestion, 5) economic activity
  • 1) Stamped, visible crosswalks, 2) Cleary marked bike lanes, 3) Pedestrian warning signs, 4) Wide sidewalks, 5) Accessible sidewalk ramps, 6) Narrowed travel lanes
  • 1) Reduced setback, 2) bicycle accommodations (markings and signage), 3) wide, clear sidewalks, 4) parking in back of building, 5) parkway buffer for peds, 6) bike racks near building, 7) ADA accessible, 8) on-street parking, 9) narrow travel lanes
  • How can this be improved???
  • How can this be improved???
  • 1) Narrow, cluttered sidewalks, 2) huge setbacks, 3) must walk through parking lot to get to stores, 4) bike rack far from stores, 5) no on-street parking, 6) very wide travel lane, 7) no transit access, 8) no buffer for peds
  • Mayor’s Office Initiative
  • The City has had a Bike Plan for a number of years Now the city has undertaken the development of a Pedestrian Safety Action Plan, and has recently completed the 1 st phase: existing conditions report. Vision statement Safety first and foremost Implementation to address funding Prioritization – factors may include crash data, infrastructure conditions, ped volumes, land use, equity issues Evaluate effectiveness of our efforts Common to all of these tasks will be a public process Start up in late summer; 12 month process
  • City of Chicago’s Complete Streets Policy (in search of total fabulousity)

    1. 1. City of Chicago’s Complete Streets Policy Graphic courtesy of European Commission: Reclaiming City Streets for People / Chaos or Quality of Life (In search of total fabulousity)
    2. 2. <ul><li>Complete Streets policy </li></ul><ul><li>Targeted Traffic Teams (T-3) </li></ul><ul><li>Public awareness campaign </li></ul><ul><li>Mayor’s Pedestrian Advisory Council </li></ul>
    3. 3. What are “Complete Streets”? <ul><li>Complete Streets are designed, operated & maintained so they are safe, comfortable and convenient for all users – pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users & motorists of all ages and abilities. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Why Do We Need Complete Streets? <ul><li>Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Choice </li></ul><ul><li>Cost effective </li></ul><ul><li>Fight climate change </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage healthy/active living </li></ul>
    5. 5. Pedestrian Safety <ul><li>2003 - 2007 averages: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>3,552 pedestrian crashes per year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over 60 pedestrian fatalities per year </li></ul></ul><ul><li>3% of total crashes but 29% of fatalities </li></ul><ul><li>named 1 of 5 “focus” cities by FHWA </li></ul><ul><li>Higher speeds = greater chance of serious injury or death </li></ul><ul><ul><li>20 MPH = 15% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>30 MPH = 45% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>40 MPH = 85% </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Americans Want to Walk & Bike More 52% of Americans want to bike more than they currently do.
    7. 7. Americans Want to Walk & Bike More 55% of Americans would prefer to drive less and walk more.
    8. 8. Not All Trips are Auto-Trips <ul><li>Approximately 33% of Americans do not drive </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 30% of Chicagoans do not own a car </li></ul><ul><li>Approximately 500 million annual CTA trips </li></ul><ul><li>Approximately 40% of work trips in Chicago are non-auto trips </li></ul><ul><li>Those who choose not to drive </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing bicycle, pedestrian & transit trips </li></ul>
    9. 9. Bicycle Counts <ul><li>Wells at Chicago – Both Directions </li></ul><ul><li>Thursday, 7/24/03 (7-9 a.m.): 228 Bikes </li></ul><ul><li>Thursday, 6/19/08 (7-9 a.m.): 518 Bikes </li></ul><ul><li>127% Increase </li></ul><ul><li>Lincoln at Webster – Both Directions </li></ul><ul><li>Thursday, 8/21/03 (7-9 a.m.): 115 Bikes </li></ul><ul><li>Thursday, 6/17/08 (7-9 a.m.): 294 Bikes </li></ul><ul><li>156% Increase </li></ul><ul><li>Milwaukee at Ohio – Both Directions </li></ul><ul><li>Thursday, 7/15/03 (7-9 a.m.): 168 Bikes </li></ul><ul><li>Thursday, 6/24/08 (7-9 a.m.): 803 Bikes </li></ul><ul><li>378% Increase </li></ul>*Source: Chicago Department of Transportation – Bicycle Program
    10. 10. Pedestrian Counts <ul><li>Bridges - South Branch of the Chicago River </li></ul><ul><li>Weekdays, 1999: 141,574 Pedestrians </li></ul><ul><li>Weekdays, 2007: 152,737 Pedestrians </li></ul><ul><li>7.8% Increase </li></ul><ul><li>Michigan Avenue – River to Oak </li></ul><ul><li>Saturdays, 1999: 549,990 Pedestrians </li></ul><ul><li>Saturdays, 2007: 637,839 Pedestrians </li></ul><ul><li>16% Increase </li></ul><ul><li>Bridges - Main Branch of the Chicago River </li></ul><ul><li>Weekdays, 1999: 85,278 Pedestrians </li></ul><ul><li>Weekdays, 2007: 89,774 Pedestrians </li></ul><ul><li>5.2% Increase </li></ul>*Source: TranSystems & TransInfo LLC, “Pedestrian Activity in Chicago’s Downtown”, December 2008
    11. 11. Transit Ridership <ul><li>CTA Bus & Rail </li></ul><ul><li>2007: 499,867,709 Riders </li></ul><ul><li>2008: 524,930,958 Riders </li></ul><ul><li>5% Increase </li></ul>*Source: Chicago Transit Authority Planning & Development, “Monthly Ridership Report December 2008”, January 16, 2009
    12. 12. We Can Build Good Streets
    13. 13. We Can Build Accessible Streets
    14. 14. We Can Accommodate All Users During All Phases of a Project
    15. 15. We Can Promote a Land Use/Transportation Connection that Accommodates All Users
    16. 16. Yet Many Streets are Built Like This
    17. 17. Many Streets Are Not Complete Sidewalks & Crosswalks in Disrepair
    18. 18. Many Streets Are Not Complete Uninviting to Bicyclists
    19. 19. Many Streets Are Not Complete Difficult to Cross on Foot
    20. 20. Many Streets Are Not Complete Inaccessible
    21. 21. Many Streets Are Not Complete Construction Zones Create Unique Pedestrian Challenges
    22. 22. Many Streets Are Not Complete Construction Zones Create Unique Pedestrian Challenges
    23. 23. Many Developments are Auto-Centric
    24. 24. Complete Streets Policies Nationwide & Statewide movement aimed at designing, operating & maintaining the entire right-of-way to ensure safety & accessibility for all users.
    25. 25. Nationwide Movement State County MPO City Legislation or resolution OR, FL, RI, SC, MA, IL, CA, MD DuPage San Diego Jackson, MI San Francisco Seattle Honolulu Columbia, MO Policies TN, CA, KY, VA, PA, MA Arlington, VA Johnson, IA Cleveland Knoxville Austin Chicago Salt Lake City Charlotte Boulder Santa Barbara Ft. Collins
    26. 26. Nationwide Movement State County MPO City Legislation or resolution OR, FL, RI, SC, MA, IL, CA, MD DuPage San Diego Jackson, MI San Francisco Seattle Honolulu Columbia, MO Policies TN, CA, KY, VA, PA, MA Arlington, VA Johnson, IA Cleveland Knoxville Austin Chicago Salt Lake City Charlotte Boulder Santa Barbara Ft. Collins
    27. 27. The Complete Streets Act of 2009 <ul><li>S. 584 / H.R. 1443 </li></ul><ul><li>Introduced March 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>DOTs & MPOs to adopt CS policies within 2 years </li></ul><ul><li>Apply to federally funded transportation projects </li></ul><ul><li>Redirect % of non-compliant state STP funds to safety projects </li></ul><ul><li>Code updates, research, data collection </li></ul>
    28. 28. Illinois Complete Streets Act (2007) <ul><li>Bicycle & Pedestrian Ways: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Should be considered in the planning of all State plans and programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shall be established in conjunction with the construction or reconstruction of any transportation facility </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. City of Chicago’s Complete Streets Policy (2006) <ul><li>“ The safety and convenience of all users of the transportation system, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users, and motor vehicle drivers, shall be accommodated and balanced in all types of transportation and development projects and through all phases of a project, so that even the most vulnerable - children, elderly, and persons with disabilities - can travel safely within the public right-of-way.” </li></ul>
    30. 30. What Does Complete Streets Mean for Chicago? <ul><li>New approach to planning, design, construction & operation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each project becomes an opportunity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engineering countermeasures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>wider sidewalks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>curb extensions/bump-outs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>raised intersections </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>road diets </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>median refuge islands </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>LPI / NTOR </li></ul></ul></ul>
    31. 31. What Does Complete Streets Mean for Chicago? <ul><li>Implementation strategy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Operationalize” Complete Streets approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intra- and interdepartmental coordination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review of Current Policies, Standards, Existing & Best Practices & Trends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Checklist Tool </li></ul></ul>
    32. 32. What Does Complete Streets Mean for Chicago? <ul><li>Crosswalk right-of-way enforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Safe Routes to School and Walk to Transit infrastructure improvements </li></ul><ul><li>Night Safety Zone study </li></ul>Pedestrian Safety Initiatives
    33. 33. What Does Complete Streets Mean for Chicago? <ul><li>Pedestrian Safety Action Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vision/Goal-setting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve safety & convenience of the pedestrian experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Implementation strategy – education, engineering, enforcement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prioritization methodology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluation methodology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community outreach </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. Questions? City of Chicago’s Complete Streets Policy

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