The Sumatran Tiger<br />By Emma<br />
Population<br />Indonesia has 65 captive Sumatran tigers living in zoos, 85 in European zoos and 20 in Australian zoos. Th...
Habitat<br />The Sumatran tiger is only found naturally in Sumatra, a large island in western Indonesia. Its habitat range...
Why are they endangered?<br />In 2006 the Indonesia Forestry Service, the Natural Resources and Conservational Agency and ...
What can I do?<br />To prevent poaching of wild Sumatran tigers, it is not enough to simply organize anti-poaching patrols...
Pictures<br />
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The sumatran tiger by Emma

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The sumatran tiger by Emma

  1. 1. The Sumatran Tiger<br />By Emma<br />
  2. 2. Population<br />Indonesia has 65 captive Sumatran tigers living in zoos, 85 in European zoos and 20 in Australian zoos. There are  70 tigers managed by North American zoos of which the Honolulu Zoo has three adults and three cubs. The Honolulu Zoo’s younger male and female pair produced three male cubs in 2008.<br />About 400-500 wild Sumatran tigers were believed to exist in 1998, but their numbers have continued to decline. <br />
  3. 3. Habitat<br />The Sumatran tiger is only found naturally in Sumatra, a large island in western Indonesia. Its habitat ranges from lowland forests to sub-mountain and mountain-forests, including swamp forests. Much of its habitat is unprotected, with only about 400 living in hunting reserves and national parks. The largest population of about 110 tigers lives in Gunung Luseur National Park. Another 100 live in unprotected areas which are being changed for agriculture.<br />Deforestation resulting from the production of Palm oil is a major threat to the Sumatran Tiger. The reserves also do not provide safety, as many tigers are killed by poachers each year despite conservation efforts. According to the Tiger Information Centre and the World Wildlife Fund there are no more than 500 remaining Sumatran Tigers in the wild, with some estimates lower.<br />
  4. 4. Why are they endangered?<br />In 2006 the Indonesia Forestry Service, the Natural Resources and Conservational Agency and the Sumatran Tiger Conservation Program sat down with commercial concession holders and Asia Pulp & Paper and set the foundations for the Senepis Buluhala Tiger Sanctuary, an area that covered 106,000 hectares in Riau by 2008. These organizations formed The Tiger Conservation Working Group with other interested parties and the project is recognised as a original initiative. Current studies include the identifying of feeding behaviour of tigers to develop strategies that will help protect both tigers and human settlements.<br />In 2007, the Indonesian Forestry Ministry and Safari Park established cooperation with the Australia Zoo for the conservation of Sumatran Tigers and other endangered species. The cooperation agreement was marked by the signing of a letter of intent on 'Sumatran Tiger and other Endangered Species Conservation Program and the Establishment of a Sister Zoo Relationship between Taman Safari and Australia Zoo' at the Indonesian Forestry Ministry office on July 31, 2007. The program includes conserving Sumatran Tigers and other endangered species in the wild, efforts to reduce conflicts between tigers and humans and restoring Sumatran Tigers and reintroducing them to their natural habitats.<br />
  5. 5. What can I do?<br />To prevent poaching of wild Sumatran tigers, it is not enough to simply organize anti-poaching patrols in tiger habitats. Rather, market demand for tiger parts also needs to be stopped.<br />
  6. 6. Pictures<br />

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