Adult Learner

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This presentation explores how adults learn during the three stages of adulthood: young adult (18 - college), medium age (post college - mid-30's), and middle age through seniors. The information examines the differences as well as the many similarities. The presentation also demonstrates the differences between Generation X and Y.

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Adult Learner

  1. 1. How Adults Learn<br />Sarah Hargrave<br />C. Nicholas Morris<br />Donna Patrick<br />
  2. 2. Learning<br />the act, process, or experience of gaining knowledge or skills <br />
  3. 3. Memory<br />the capacity of storing, retrieving, and acting on that knowledge <br />
  4. 4. Young AdultsCollege Age / New Millennials<br />Sarah Hargrave<br />
  5. 5. <ul><li>Ages 18-25
  6. 6. Stage of transformation
  7. 7. Transition into adulthood
  8. 8. “Adulthood is reached when individuals become personally accountable for themselves and accept adult responsibilities” (Lawson, 2008, p. 351).</li></li></ul><li>Young Adults Today - 2010<br /><ul><li>Mosaic, Generation Me, Generation Y
  9. 9. Digital environment
  10. 10. Socially different:
  11. 11. Communication is instant
  12. 12. Video games
  13. 13. Structured schedules
  14. 14. Fast pace life
  15. 15. High expectations </li></li></ul><li>Desires of the Young Adult<br /><ul><li>Want to belong
  16. 16. Want to be connected
  17. 17. Want to be needed
  18. 18. Want to be respected
  19. 19. Want to be self-directing
  20. 20. Want practical insight and knowledge
  21. 21. Want to share their experiences
  22. 22. Want truth</li></li></ul><li>Some bad news...<br /><ul><li>LifeWay research study: 18-34 year olds
  23. 23. falling away from church
  24. 24. finding church irrelevant
  25. 25. “Young adults are nonetheless longing for community and fellowship with peers, looking for ways to reach people in need, and circling the church but not always finding a home in it” (Lawson, 2008, p.348).</li></li></ul><li>How Young Adults Learn<br /><ul><li>Discussion
  26. 26. Hands on experience
  27. 27. Application
  28. 28. Visuals
  29. 29. Media
  30. 30. Collaboration</li></li></ul><li>How To Teach Young Adults<br /><ul><li>Develop opportunities for experiential learning
  31. 31. Provide structure
  32. 32. Provide feedback
  33. 33. Use technology
  34. 34. Make it fun
  35. 35. Be relevant
  36. 36. Utilize their talents
  37. 37. Be visual
  38. 38. Recognize the need for social interaction
  39. 39. Allow talking and discussion
  40. 40. Break up the class every 20 to 30 minutes</li></li></ul><li>Generation X & Y<br />C. Nicholas Morris<br />
  41. 41. Explaining the Difference<br />Bridging the Gap<br />Y<br />Generations<br />X<br />
  42. 42. Generations<br />Born 1964 to the latest 1981<br />Other studies show 1965 – 1976<br />The “13th Generation” 1961 – 1981<br />Baby Bust – 1970 lowest year of babies born<br />51 Million<br />Born mid 1970’s – early 2000<br />Millennial Generation<br />Generation Next<br />Net Generation<br />Echo Boomers<br />75 Million<br />Generation X <br />Generation Y<br />
  43. 43. Generations<br />Generation X <br />Generation Y<br />Accepts Diversity<br />Pragmatic/Practical<br /> Self-reliant/Individualistic<br />Reject Rules<br />Killer Life<br />Mistrust Institutions<br />PC<br />Use Technology<br />Multitask<br />Latch-key Kids<br />Friend – Not Family<br />Celebrates Diversity<br />Optimistic/Realistic<br />Self-inventive/individualistic<br />Rewrite the Rules<br />Killer Lifestyle<br />Irrelevance of Institutions<br />Internet<br />Assume Technology<br />Multitask Fast<br />Nurtured<br />Friend = Family<br />
  44. 44. Adults Are:<br /><ul><li>Autonomous and Self Directed
  45. 45. Life Experience and Knowledge
  46. 46. Goal Oriented
  47. 47. Relevancy Oriented
  48. 48. Practical
  49. 49. Respect</li></li></ul><li>Motivation Factors<br /><ul><li>Social Relationships
  50. 50. ExternalExpectations
  51. 51. SocialWelfare
  52. 52. PersonalAdvancement
  53. 53. Escape/Stimulation
  54. 54. CognitiveInterest</li></li></ul><li>Critical Elements of Learning<br /><ul><li>Motivation
  55. 55. Reinforcement
  56. 56. Retention
  57. 57. Transference</li></li></ul><li>Adults Learn Best<br /><ul><li>They understand why something is important to know or do
  58. 58. They have the freedom to learn in their own way
  59. 59. Learning is experiential
  60. 60. The time is right for them to learn
  61. 61. The process is positive and encouraging</li></li></ul><li>35 and beyondGen X, Boomers, Seniors<br />Donna Patrick<br />
  62. 62. Middle Adult Transitions<br /><ul><li>Raising children – empty nest
  63. 63. Physical strength – increased weakness
  64. 64. Health – affliction
  65. 65. Satisfying Marriage – Loss of Spouse
  66. 66. Large Social Group – Fewer friends
  67. 67. Active Lifestyle – Passive lifestyle</li></li></ul><li>Andragogy<br /><ul><li>Learning strategies focused on adults
  68. 68. Engaging adult learners with the structure of the learning experience
  69. 69. Alternative to pedagogy
  70. 70. Takes the adult learner seriously and respects the adult learner’s investment in learning</li></li></ul><li>Assumptions of Andragogy<br /><ul><li>The need to know – adult learners need to know why they need to learn something before trying to learn it
  71. 71. The learner’s self-concept – self-direction; responsible for their own decisions and be treated as such
  72. 72. Readiness to learn – adults need learning that will help them cope with life situations</li></li></ul><li>Assumptions of Andragogy<br /><ul><li>Orientation to learning – they are motivated by task- or problem-oriented educational experiences
  73. 73. Motivation – adults respond to inner motivation vs. external motivation </li></li></ul><li>Adult Learning<br /><ul><li>Only when we join sound learning theory to biblical theology can we expect to find effective teaching/learning methodology
  74. 74. The Word of God serves as our starting point for how adults learn
  75. 75. Only through a biblical grid can we form a Christian understanding of how adults learn
  76. 76. Adult Christian Education centers on the goal of Christ-likeness; it aims at transformation of both mind and life (Rom 12:1-2)</li></li></ul><li>Strategy<br /><ul><li>Teach the Bible
  77. 77. Speak to real needs
  78. 78. Relate teaching material to everyday life – make it practical
  79. 79. Listen to what they say they want – Ask!
  80. 80. Allow freedom of choice – involve them in decisions about their learning</li></li></ul><li>Strategy<br /><ul><li>Balance lecture with discussion
  81. 81. Avoid “yes or no” questions
  82. 82. Get the participants’ input before selecting curriculum
  83. 83. Don’t fill the class session with mere “content”; allow time for discussion and reflection
  84. 84. Show respect for past personal experiences of learners</li></li></ul><li>Resources<br />Conner, M. L. How Adults Learn Ageless Learner, 1997-2007. http://agelesslearner.com/intros/adultlearning.html <br />http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/GenY.htm<br />The Learning Café and American Demographics enterprisingmuseum 2003 <br />Lieb, S<br />South Mountain Community College<br />VISION, Fall 1991<br />http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/adults-2.htm<br />5 Principles for the Teacher of Adults<br />Teaching Adult Learners<br />By Deb Peterson, About.com Guide<br />http://adulted.about.com/od/teachers/a/teachingadults.htm<br />Scheef, D. and Thielfoldt, D. Generation X and The Millennials: What You Need to Know About Mentoring the New Generations August 2004<br />http://www.abanet.org/lpm/lpt/articles/mgt08044.html<br />US Census Bureau, in their 2009 Statistical Abstract.<br />

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