Giving Meaningful     Feedback      ROCHELLE STEVENSONCENTRE FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING     UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR       JAN...
Ice Breaker! How comfortable are you with receiving feedback? How comfortable are you with giving feedback?
What do we need to provide  meaningful feedback?
What do we need to give feedback? Learning Objectives   Syllabus   Assignment Instructions Rubric   Matrix denoting d...
Meaningful Feedback         Learning         Objectives                      MarkingRubric                       Key      ...
What if we don’t have what we need? Open dialogue with the professor or instructor Department or faculty guidelines Uni...
The “How” of Feedback             SCENARIO: GA OFFICE HOURS AFTER AN EXAM HAS           BEEN RETURNED MEETING WITH A STUDE...
Differences in Feedback Positive feedback is just good   Comments like “Good job” or “Well done”   Checkmarks, smiley f...
Feedback should be SMART            Specific     S     Measurable     M     A     Achievable     R            Realistic   ...
SMART Feedback Practice       USING THE SAMPLE ANSWER,  PROVIDE A FEW SENTENCES OF WRITTEN    FEEDBACK BASED ON MAKING THE...
Feedback should be SMART            Specific     S     Measurable     M     A     Achievable     R            Realistic   ...
SMART Feedback Practice      USING THE SAMPLE ANSWER,  PROVIDE A FEW SENTENCES OF WRITTEN    FEEDBACK BASED ON MAKING THE ...
SMART Feedback Practice What was different between the two exercises?   Easier?   More difficult? Did having the rubri...
Main Points of Workshop Key things you need to provide meaningful feedback    Task expectations and learning outcomes  ...
Thank you!ROCHELLE STEVENSONstevensr@uwindsor.ca
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GATA Winter Academy: Giving Meaningful Feedback workshop, presented by Rochelle Stevenson

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On January 10, 2013, PhD student Rochelle Stevenson presented a workshop on Giving Meaningful Feedback as part of GATA Winter Academy. Workshops like this one provide professional development for teaching assistants at the University of Windsor.

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  • Ask for clarification.Indicate that you will be better able to do your job with that information.Indicate that you will feel more comfortable about marking with that information.What are the department/faculty guidelines about your work – as a GA – with students (i.e., emails turnaround time, expectations of office hours)?It is important to open a dialogue with your professor to clarify expectations and make sure that you have everything you need to provide effective feedback.University resources like the GATA Network, CTL, even librarians can help you to come up with a basic rubric if neededOr you can take the resources I’m giving you today and dialogue with your prof/instructor about how to adjust them to best suit the course
  • Constructive feedback is meaningful feedback
  • S – specific – providing details about which improvements are necessary – eg. answering the questionM – measureable – easy to see if it is achieved, eg. maintain clarity of answer, answer the question (rather than just write a better answer)A – achievable – can the student do it? For example, memorizing the textbook is not achievable, but providing note taking tips to increase retention of knowledge is. The feedback provided is achievable.R – realistic – connected to Achievable. For example, tips for drawing attention to the important parts of the question is realistic. Advocating four hours of study time a day is not.T – timely – means close to the time of the task, as well as in time to improve the next task. Giving feedback from the mid-term two days before the final exam is not timely, and does not offer the time needed to incorporate the constructive feedback should the students choose to do this.
  • GATA Winter Academy: Giving Meaningful Feedback workshop, presented by Rochelle Stevenson

    1. 1. Giving Meaningful Feedback ROCHELLE STEVENSONCENTRE FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR JANUARY 10, 2013.
    2. 2. Ice Breaker! How comfortable are you with receiving feedback? How comfortable are you with giving feedback?
    3. 3. What do we need to provide meaningful feedback?
    4. 4. What do we need to give feedback? Learning Objectives  Syllabus  Assignment Instructions Rubric  Matrix denoting differing levels of achievement based on the learning objectives Marking Key  Checklist denoting specific scoring and content requirements
    5. 5. Meaningful Feedback Learning Objectives MarkingRubric Key FEEDBACK
    6. 6. What if we don’t have what we need? Open dialogue with the professor or instructor Department or faculty guidelines University resources
    7. 7. The “How” of Feedback SCENARIO: GA OFFICE HOURS AFTER AN EXAM HAS BEEN RETURNED MEETING WITH A STUDENT WHO HAS QUESTIONS ABOUT THEIR GRADE AND PERFORMANCE
    8. 8. Differences in Feedback Positive feedback is just good  Comments like “Good job” or “Well done”  Checkmarks, smiley faces Negative feedback is just bad  Comments like “Not enough” or “Need more”  Xs, strikethroughs, question marks Constructive feedback is a blend of both, providing avenues for improvement
    9. 9. Feedback should be SMART Specific S Measurable M A Achievable R Realistic T Timely
    10. 10. SMART Feedback Practice USING THE SAMPLE ANSWER, PROVIDE A FEW SENTENCES OF WRITTEN FEEDBACK BASED ON MAKING THE FEEDBACK SMART. SELECT A REPRESENTATIVE TO SHARE YOUR FEEDBACK WITH THE REST OF THE GROUP.
    11. 11. Feedback should be SMART Specific S Measurable M A Achievable R Realistic T Timely
    12. 12. SMART Feedback Practice USING THE SAMPLE ANSWER, PROVIDE A FEW SENTENCES OF WRITTEN FEEDBACK BASED ON MAKING THE FEEDBACK SMART. USE THE RUBRIC TO ASSIST YOU IN MARKING THE ANSWER.
    13. 13. SMART Feedback Practice What was different between the two exercises?  Easier?  More difficult? Did having the rubric change your process of giving feedback?
    14. 14. Main Points of Workshop Key things you need to provide meaningful feedback  Task expectations and learning outcomes  Rubric (with descriptors)  Dialogue with professor to clarify these things Feedback should be constructive and should provide avenues for further development  SMART feedback  Tone of feedback
    15. 15. Thank you!ROCHELLE STEVENSONstevensr@uwindsor.ca

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