Seasons of ChangeA Coaching Workbook forTransition, Redundancy & Career ChangeJonathan PassmoreDenise Pearsonforeword bySi...
Seasons of ChangeA Coaching Workbook forTransition, Redundancy & Career ChangeJonathan PassmoreDenise Pearsonwith foreword...
Acknowledgements                                                                                                          ...
Foreword                                                                                                        ContentsTh...
Spring                                                 Recruitment  Assessment       165Enhancing Your Impact and Performa...
Activities                                                       Activity27: InfluencingOthers                            ...
Introduction                  “Wisdom is knowing what to do next, skill is knowing how to                                 ...
IntroductIon                                                                                                              ...
IntroductIon                                                                                                              ...
IntroductIonThe Seasons Coaching Model                                                     Questions                      ...
Autumn                       “Change is a measure of time and, in the Autumn, time                      seems speeded up. ...
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Autumn                                             Autumn Learning Log             Learning Log Date                     D...
Autumn                                             Autumn Learning Log             Learning Log Date                     D...
42
WinterChange and Transition                     “Everybody has a world, and that world is completely hid-                 ...
WInter                                                                                                                    ...
WInter                                                                                                                    ...
WInter                                                                                                                    ...
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore
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There is a plethora of coaching books on the market now and no one is going to read them all, although all probably have gems in them, and between them they address most circumstances and applications. Uniquely this book covers all bases and is truly a ‘Coaching Book’.

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Seasons of change by Jonathan Passmore

  1. 1. Seasons of ChangeA Coaching Workbook forTransition, Redundancy & Career ChangeJonathan PassmoreDenise Pearsonforeword bySir John Whitmore
  2. 2. Seasons of ChangeA Coaching Workbook forTransition, Redundancy & Career ChangeJonathan PassmoreDenise Pearsonwith foreword by Sir John Whitmore
  3. 3. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank colleagues at the University of East London for their contributions to this title, as well as the Association for Coaching, Chartered Management Institute and our families. We would also like to thank John Ashton of ickledot for his tireless work in editing and design, Katharine Passmore for proofreading along with Rachel Mulvey and Nelica La Gro for their help and support.Publisher’s notesEvery possible effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this book is accurateat the time of going to press, and the publishers and authors cannot accept responsibility for any errorsor omissions, however caused. No responsibility for loss or damage occasioned to any person acting, orrefraining from action, as a result of the material in this publication can be accepted by the publisher oreither of the authors.Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of research or private study, or criticism or review, as permit-ted under the Copyright, Design and Patents Act 1988, this publication may only be reproduced, stored ortransmitted, in any form or by any means, with the prior permission in writing of the publishers, or in thecase of reprographic reproduction in accordance with the terms and licences by the CLA. Enquiries con-cerning reproduction outside of these terms should be sent to the School of Psychology, University of EastLondon, Water Lane, London E15 4LZ.© Passmore & Pearson 2011ISBN 978-1-905858-22-4
  4. 4. Foreword ContentsThere is a plethora of coaching books on the market now and no one is going to read them all, although Acknowledgementsall probably have gems in them, and between them they address most circumstances and applications.Uniquely this book covers all bases and is truly a ‘Coaching Book’. It coaches you, or rather you can coach Forewordyourself with it. What could be better than that? IntroductionYears ago when I ran a ski school based on the Inner Game, many of our clients told us that after attend-ing a weeklong mountain course with us they no longer needed to go to a ski ‘school’ in the holidays each How to use the workbook coaching approach 2winter as they used to do, because now they could coach themselves. This also had the important effect Workbook Objectives 4on them of feeling fully responsible for their own learning, of being more autonomous, and enhancing theirself-belief. This book is likely have a similar impact on you. The Career Management Sequence 5Coaching based on Rogerian person-centered psychology is all about helping people to become aware and The Seasons Coaching Model 6responsible for their own learning, performance, enjoyment etc.The ultimate step in this process is to weanyourself off your coach. This book does just that but it even goes further; it replaces your coach, though it Autumnby no means negates or precludes using one if you wish to. Harvesting Knowledge, Skills and Behaviour 7In these hard economic times with other uncertainties in the air, your career and your life track may be What are My Personal Objectives? 9in question. Becoming your own coach may be the best thing you can do. The bonus is that if you use thisbook diligently it will also equip you with a range of coaching skills that you can apply with others too. I Personal Experience 26love the very apt seasonal approach it uses, I like the clear layout and the ample but unobtrusive guidance Self-awareness 28through its usage. Jonathan and Denise deserve much credit for this important addition to the coaching lit-erature - and such a practical one too for everyone. Values and Needs 32 WinterSir John Whitmore PhD Change and Transition 43Executive Chairman Financial Planning 44Performance Consultants International The Change Curve 51 Challenging Paradigms 68 Role Transition 70 Factors for Success 73 Influencing 76 LevelsofInfluence 77 Personal Motivation 81 Development on the Journey 83 Personal Development Opportunities 83 Stages of Personal Development 84 Life Roles 86
  5. 5. Spring Recruitment Assessment 165Enhancing Your Impact and Performance 101 Self awareness 165Presentation Skills 103 Work Life Balance 165Appearance and Body Language During Interviews 104 Useful Contacts and Websites 166Understanding the Selection Process 105 Where to Find Help 167The Visible and Hidden Job Market 106The Hidden Job Market: Stakeholder Mapping 107Stakeholder Power Matrix 108The Hidden Job Market: Networks 110Job Advertisements 114Telephone Calls 116Letters 117Curricula Vitae (CVs) 118TheBiographicalProfile 123Psychometrics 124Interviews 126Interview Questions 131Competency-based Selection Interviews 132Assessment Centres 134SummerFuture Plans 137How Can I Develop? 144Role Modelling 149Personal Development Planning 157Dreams and Aspirations 160Further Reading ReferencesCareer Management 162Career Planning 162Change 163Coaching 164
  6. 6. Activities Activity27: InfluencingOthers Activity 28: What’s Important to You? 80 82Autumn Activity 29: What Stage Are You At? 85Activity 1: Where Am I Now? 8 Activity 30: Life Roles 87Activity 2: Personal Objective Setting 10 SpringActivity3: RefiningYourObjectives 11 Activity 31: My Job Search Action Plan 90Activity 4: Who Am I? 12 Activity 32: Supporting Your Job Search 96Activity 5: What’s Important to Me? 14 Activity 33: Stakeholder Mapping 107Activity 6: My Skills Audit 16 Activity 34: Prioritising Your Stakeholders 108Activity 7: From Key Words to Competencies 21 Activity 35: Building a Network 112Activity 8: Getting Into the Detail 22 Activity 36: The 90 Second Network Introduction 113Activity 9: Personal Experience 26 Activity 37: Understanding Job Advertisements 114Activity 10: Knowing Myself 29 Activity 38: Notes for CV Production 120Activity 11: Parts of Myself 31 Activity 39: The Interview - Preparation 127Activity 12: My Values 34 Activity 40: The Interview - Predicting the Questions 128Activity 13: My Highest Scoring Values 36 Activity 41: The Interview - Predicting the Answers 129Activity 14: When I’m 64 36 Activity 42: The Interview - Strengths and Weaknesses 130Activity 15: Learning Log 37 SummerWinter Activity 43: Learning Styles 141Activity 16: My Six-Monthly Financial Planner 46 Activity 44: What Makes a Powerful Learning Experience? 142Activity 17: My Financial Planning 48 Activity 45: Experience Testing 145Activity 18: My Personal Change Journey 56 Activity 46: Your Preferred Style 151Activity 19: Change or No Change? 59 Activity 47: Work-Life Balance 152Activity 20: Managing the Stress and Anxiety of Change 60 Activity 48: Life Balance 154Activity 21: Logging Stress 64 Activity 49: My Personal Development Plan 159Activity 22: Challenging your Paradigm 69 Activity 50: My Future Dreams and Aspirations? 161Activity 23: Work-Life Balance 72Activity 24: Into the Future 74Activity25: EffectiveInfluencing 76Activity26: LevelsofInfluence 79
  7. 7. Introduction “Wisdom is knowing what to do next, skill is knowing how to do it, and virtue is doing it.” David Starr JordanThis coaching workbook is the result of a collaborative process. It has been designed to meet the chang-ing needs and requirements of individuals within the UK workforce. It has been specifically developed tobe relevant for those working in both public and private sectors who wish to take control of their careers.If you are using this workbook as a result of company downsizing, you may be asking ‘why me?’ The firstthing to understand is that changes are not directed at you personally. The world of work has alteredradically over the past few years; change is a common part of the working landscape. Companies makedecisions based on economic criteria. Many employers provide individuals with the help and support theyneed to deal with change.The emotional consequences of change as well as physical needs of the individual are explored. The coach-ing workbook has been designed primarily as a personal study guide. However, the workbook can alsobe used in conjunction with the UEL transition training programmes (see page 167 for further details).References to other publications which may be of value to the reader are provided on pages 162–165.The workbook uses guiding and coaching rather than a traditional training approach. It is divided into foursections following the seasons, starting with Autumn, which covers the harvesting of existing knowledge,through Winter, a time when growth, preparation and activity is deep and often not fully visible. This sec-tion covers the financial and emotional aspect of transition. Spring focuses on growth and tools for success.Summer provides techniques for ongoing success as well as an opportunity to review progress. 1
  8. 8. IntroductIon IntroductIonHow to use the workbook coaching approach What do we mean by coaching?The workbook is based on the principle that Career Management is a learned behaviour. There are many definitions that could describe the term ‘coaching’. Some emphasize its instructional nature nature, while others suggest that it is more about facilitation.It is intended that it be used as a practical tool to help you to extend your understanding of the elementswhich make up successful role transitions. It provides a range of activities and approaches to transition. Within this workbook we have adopted the following definition:These can be completed on your own or with a colleague mentor or peer based on your personalpreference. “Coaching is unlocking a person’s potential to maximise their performance.” Whitmore, 1992The activities within this workbook ask you to write your reflections. Do not feel limited by the spaceprovided. It is not an indication as to how much should be written. Feel free to use additional pages tocomplete your personal reflections. The self coaching exercises include thought provoking questions. We look at ‘What does the coachee wantThe exercises allow you time to formulate your own personal plan through self-reflection. Each one, where to achieve?’ ‘What are the measures of success?’The exercises have been designed to draw out informationappropriate, is accompanied by coaching questions and provides guidance for individuals who are either from the user. The approach is research based and builds upon ‘what good coaches do to improve perfor-planning their career or are unsure of their next career steps. It can also be used by individuals who have mance’. We have adapted this approach to form a guide to self-coaching, drawing upon coaching techniques.specific requirements within one of the topic areas. The workbook can be used to refresh on individual We have used open questions to develop self-awareness, responsibility and to encourage the thought process.topics, or to introduce individuals to new methods and tools for success. The workbook is designed to facilitate, stimulate and support learning through self reflection.We have taken a step-by-step approach to change and self improvement. Each section has exercises and We have outlined the GROW model below as an approach to goal achievement and self-discovery. A use-activities, as well as general information. Each exercise has questions to aid self reflection and a notes sec- ful metaphor for the grow model is planning a journey. Firstly, we need the post code of our destinationtion, allowing the user to record thoughts, future activity and future goals. (Our Goal) and the home postcode or where we are now (Reality). We can then Google the possible routes we could take. The results provided offer the choice of routes e.g. the quickest route, the motorway route or the route which avoids road works(Options). We now have all of the information if we decide toThe structure of the coaching workbook make the journey (Will).Depending upon your requirements. You may prefer to work through the workbook, systematically and do Destination G what do I want to achieve?the exercises in the order they are presented or you may prefer to pick topics of particular interest to you. Home R what is happening now? Possible routes O what else could I do? Making the journey W what will I do now? When will I do it? The GROW (Goal, Reality, Options and Will) model is the format used within the coaching exercises to deepen personal awareness and to support goal attainment. We accept that we are not the experts in the ‘users’ situation, the aim is to provide questions which will allow the user to reflect and select the best options based on their personal situation. This approach does not offer advice or direction. It provides a framework for you to discover your own way forward in your career. 2 3
  9. 9. IntroductIon IntroductIonWorkbook Objectives The Career Management SequenceThe objectives of this workbook are: Some have suggested that there are a number of stages or sequences within career management, with individuals moving from the need for basic information through to a need for detailed developed under- • to identify transferable skills, knowledge and competencies standing (Law Watts). • to aid exploration of options and choices and thereby deepen self awareness The key areas for career management are: Decision Making, Opportunity Awareness, Transition Skills and Self-Awareness. These are often referred to as DOTS. The DOTS model is very useful in terms of what an • to provide exercises which support transition and clarify career goals individual’s search looks like. However, it does not provide an answer to the question ‘how do I progress?’ • to identify steps on your career journey The coaching workbook builds upon these themes, adapting and re-ordering the framework. Each area • to identify personal development needs relates to a season. The sections build and allow the user to explore in their own time. • to give an understanding of the selection process • to provide a knowledge and understanding of the different tools used in selection • to identify options and choices • to provide guidance in the production of a CV • to demonstrate the value of a step-by-step approach to job search • to demonstrate how to exploit the job market in terms of visible and hidden opportunity • to build confidence 4 5
  10. 10. IntroductIonThe Seasons Coaching Model Questions Areas Explored Autumn Actual and potential personal strengths. Self awareness Ability, attitudes, practical skills, personal Understanding yourself in career- Where am I now? qualities. Self-awareness, also includes related terms and knowing what Who am I? exploration of personal needs, personal you seek from work and learning What is important to me? aspirations and what is of value to the Where will I begin? individual Winter Change and Transition The effects of transition, the change curve, Becoming able to implement Do I understand my financial position? the skills required to cope with new decisions and deal with the con- How will I cope with change? situations. Gathering information, com- sequences, using relevant skills How satisfied am I? munication skills and interpersonal skills, and tactics How can I influence others? budgetary skills. Spring Opportunity awareness What information do I need? Knowing what work oppor tunities exist Knowing and understanding what How do I manage my job search? and their requirements. Understanding is available and what it offers and How can I improve my performance? personal preferences, style, strengths and demands How does the selection process work? characteristics. Summer Decisions What will I do? Skills in decision-making. These include the What changes do I want? ability to collate and analyse information, Learning how to make decisions What are my learning goals? and the ability to prioritise. and apply various skills and styles How can I develop? Theories of learning, personal develop- of decision-making appropriately What are my future plans? ment planning and goal setting. D Pearson, 2011 6
  11. 11. Autumn “Change is a measure of time and, in the Autumn, time seems speeded up. What was is not and never again will be; what is, is change.” Edwin Way TealeIn order to succeed, an individual needs not only to have the right skills, knowledge and abilities, but alsothe right attitude. Developing one’s career and responding to the challenges which come our way can con-sume a great deal of effort and energy. The first step in becoming able to deal with these challenges is todeepen our understanding of ourselves and how we are likely to respond. In doing so, we can also becomemore accepting of change and increasingly able to build personal resilience. Autumn Questions Areas Explored Self-awareness Actual and potential personal strengths. Ability, attitudes, practical skills, personal Where am I now? qualities. Self-awareness, also includes Understanding yourself in career- Who am I? exploration of personal needs, personal related terms and knowing what What is important to me? aspirations and what is of value to the you seek from work and learning Where will I begin? individual.Harvesting Knowledge, Skills and BehaviourIt is often the case that people do not recognise the specific contributions which they have made to theircompany, team or community. Many just do their job without spending time to reflect on the skills andknowledge they have collected over the years.In this section we will explore your life’s journey, what you want to get from life and what you want tocontribute.You don’t have to complete all the exercises. Some of them are designed to get you to think about a par-ticular issue in a number of ways, so if you feel uncomfortable about doing one or more of them, move onto the next.The workbook has been designed to follow a self coaching approach. This is explained more fully withinthe introduction (see page 1). 7
  12. 12. Autumn Autumn Activity 1: Where Am I Now? What are My Personal Objectives? The activity below is designed to start the thought process in order to build your personal information Individuals often have agreed action plans in terms of their work. There is a large body of evidence which library. suggests that setting personal objectives for learning is critical. This exercise will help you to reflect on why you are using this workbook. Answer the following questions: We recognise that individuals record thoughts, feelings and other responses in a variety of ways. Some are happy to answer questions in phrases or sentences while others prefer to draw illustrated mind maps. We 1. Where am I now (my job search, employment)? are happy for you to use a method of recording which is most comfortable and convenient for you. The next exercise is designed to link your personal objectives and those stated within the workbook. It will introduce you to the coaching-based approach to goal setting and self-reflection. An example of a mind map 2. Where do I want to be? 3. What are my options? 4. What timescales do I need to work to? 8 9
  13. 13. Autumn Autumn Activity 2: Personal Objective Setting Self Coaching Questions Think about your personal requirements in terms of your job search. How many of your objectives are covered within the workbook? Are there any of your needs which are not covered by the workbook? What do you want to get from the workbook (please be specific)? Check - You may find that some of these objectives are covered but worded differently. How could you tackle any objective which is not fully covered? How could the wording of your objectives be further refined? Are your objectives clear? Activity3:RefiningYourObjectives Once you are happy with your list or mind map, place the refined objectives within the template below. Remember: in order to know when you have reached your goal it needs to have a clearly defined mea- sure of success and a timescale. Objective Measure of Success Timescale Now go back to page 4 in the introduction and review the book’s objectives again. 10 11
  14. 14. Autumn Autumn Activity 4: Who Am I? Self Coaching Questions Very rarely do we allocate time for self-reflection. A good starting point for the job search process is to 1. In which area are you most skilled? compare our skills and expertise to what we actually enjoy doing. This activity is designed to explore your skills and preferences. Thinking abour your current or most recent work, write your particular roles and responsibilities in the 2. Do the aspects you enjoyed about your role link to your high skill areas? first column of the table below. Score how well you think you performed in each area in column 2, using a score of 1 - 10 where 10 is high and 1 is low. 3. Are there any high enjoyment - low competence areas? In the third column, score each area in terms of how much you enjoyed fulfilling that particular role or Would you benefit from training in these? task, again using a scale of 1 - 10 where 10 is high and 1 is low. How else could you raise your skill levels? My work roles and responsibilities Competence Enjoyment level 1 to 10 level 1 to10 4. Do any of your answers in the first column trigger memories of past accomplishments? 5. What additional insight have you gained from this exercise? 6. Are there any other areas that you are good at and enjoy which are not on your list? Notes 12 13
  15. 15. Autumn Autumn Activity 5: What’s Important to Me? Self Coaching Questions In order to make effective decisions both in work and other areas of life, each person needs to have a 1. How might you ensure that the important elements of your working life are in harmony with clear understanding of what is important to them. the things that really matter to you? As has been said many times before, no two people are exactly alike and we all have our own views and priorities in life. For some, relationships have a central importance in their life while others value time spent on their own. 2. Put the items into an ordered list, beginning with the ones which are most important to you. There are also different priorities placed on money - some desire only enough to afford the basic plea- sures and necessities of life. Others use the acquisition of wealth as a measure of their success. In the two columns below, list the areas of your life which are most important to you. 3. How will the list affect your job search? Life as a Whole Work Notes 14 15
  16. 16. Autumn Autumn Activity 6: My Skills Audit Things That I’m Good At and Enjoy The activities below are designed to help you recognise and analyse your skills and competencies. These achieving, adapting, dressing, administering, analysing, assessing, arranging, assembling, auditing, building, can be drawn from many areas, not just your current or previous employment. carving, checking, classifying, collecting, compiling, completing, composing, conserving, consolidating, constructing, controlling, cooking, coordinating, crafting, creating, cultivating, cutting, deciding, delivering, These activities will help you to gain a clearer understanding of your individual skills and knowledge.They designing, detecting, determining, developing, devising, diagnosing, directing, discovering, dispensing, will also assist you in formulating your CV and other job applications. displaying, disassembling, dissecting, distributing, drawing, driving, editing, eliminating, emptying, enforcing, The first part of the skills audit is divided into 4 sections: establishing, estimating, evaluating, examining, expanding, experimenting, explaining, extracting, fashioning filing, financing, finishing, fixing, forecasting, founding, gathering, generalising, generating, growing, handling, • things that I am good at and enjoy having, responsibility, heading, identifying, problems, illustrating, implementing, improving, improvising, informing, innovatin,g inspecting, integrating, interpreting, inventing, investigating, judging, keeping, logging, • my skills in dealing with people maintaining, making, managing, manipulating, manufacturing, memorising, modelling, monitoring, motivating, moulding, navigating, serving, pertaining, offering, operating, ordering, organising, originating, overseeing, • my practical skills painting, photographing, highlighting, planning, precision, predicting, preparing, prescribing, printing, problem-solving, progressing, processing, programming, projecting, promoting, proofreading, protecting, • my skills with concepts and information providing, publicising, purchasing, raising, reading, reasoning, receiving, recommending, reconciling, In each section, highlight the words which best fit your individual skills. Highlight as many as you think are reconstructing, recording, recruiting, reducing, referring, rehabilitating, repairing, reporting, representing, appropriate. Feel free to add other words. You may prefer to list your skills and knowledge. researching, resolving, responding, restoring, retrieving, reviewing, scheduling, selecting, selling, separating, serving, setting-up, shaping, showing, sketching, solving, sorting, studying, summarising, synergising, taking Then pick out and list the ten most important words in each section. instructions, testing, transcribing, translating, treating, troubleshooting, tutoring, typing, understanding, unifying, upgrading, using, utilising, winning, working, writing My Top Ten 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 16 17
  17. 17. Autumn Autumn My Skills in Dealing with People My Practical Skills Acting, achieving, addressing, administering, advising, amusing, analysing, arbitrating, arranging, assessing, Achieving, adapting, addressing, administering, analysing, assessing, arranging, assembling, auditing, building, auditing, budgeting, building, caring, charting, chairing, checking, classifying, coaching, communicating, carving, checking, classifying, collecting, compiling, completing, consolidating, constructing, controlling, conducting, consolidating, consulting, controlling, conversing, coordinating, coping, counselling, creating, coordinating, crafting, creating, cultivating, cutting, deciding, delivering, designing, detecting, determining, cultivating, debating, deciding, defining, delivering, detailing, detecting, developing, diagnosing, directing, developing, devising, diagnosing, digging, directing, discovering, dispensing, displaying, disproving, detecting, discovering, displaying, dramatising, drawing, driving, empathising, empowering, encouraging, enforcing, distributing, drawing, editing, eliminating, emptying, enforcing, establishing, examining, expanding, editing, establishing, estimating, evaluating, examining, experimenting, explaining, expressing, financing, fixing, experimenting, extracting, fashioning, feeding, filing, financing, finishing, fixing, forecasting, founding, following, founding, gathering, giving, guiding, having, heading, healing, helping, identifying, handling, illustrating, gathering, generalising, getting, giving, growing, hammering, handling, having, identifying, illustrating, imagining, implementing, improving, increasing, influencing informing initiative inspecting inspiring, implementing, improving, innovating inspecting, interrogating, interpreting, inventing judging keeping, lifting, instructing, interpreting, interviewing, investigating, judging, leading, learning, lecturing, listening, maintaining, maintaining, making, managing manipulating, manufacturing, memorising, modelling, monitoring, motivating, managing, mediating, meeting, mentoring, modelling, monitoring, motivating, negotiating, observing, navigating, observing, obtaining, offering, operating, ordering, organising, overseeing, piloting, planning, offering, operating, organising, originating, overseeing, performing, persuading, piloting, pioneering, planning, playing, predicting, preparing, prescribing, processing, programming projecting proof-reading, protecting, playing, preparing, presenting, problem-solving, processing, promoting, providing, publicising, purchasing, purchasing, reading, realising, reasoning, receiving, recommending, reconciling, recording, recruiting, questioning, raising, reasoning, recommending, reconciling, recording, recruiting, referring, relating, reducing, referring, remembering, rendering, repairing, reporting, representing, resolving, responding, remembering, repairing, representing, researching, resolving, responding, risking, scheduling, screening, restoring, reviewing, scheduling, selecting, selling, sensing, separating, serving setting, solving, summarising, selecting, selling, sensing, serving, shaping, showing, sketching, studying, summarising, supervising, supplying, supervising, supplying, symbolising, taking, tending, tolerating, training, transcribing, tutoring, understanding, symbolising, synergising, taking, talking, teaching, teambuilding, telephoning, telling, tending, testing, tolerating, unifying, utilising, weighing, working, writing. training, translating, treating, troubleshooting, tutoring, understanding, undertaking. updating, upgrading, using, winning, working, writing. My Top Ten My Top Ten 1. 1. 2. 2. 3. 3. 4. 4. 5. 5. 6. 6. 7. 7. 8. 8. 9. 9. 10. 10. 18 19
  18. 18. Autumn Autumn My Skills with Concepts and Information Activity 7: From Key Words to Competencies Accounting, adapting, administering, analysing, anticipating, asserting, assembling auditing, budgeting, collating, By now you should have a clearer understanding of your individual skills within the four areas. charting, checking, classifying, collecting, compiling, completing, composing, conserving, consolidating, constructing, controlling, checking, creating, deciding, defining, delivering, designing, detecting, determined, Next, you need to link these to what employers require. developing, devising, diagnosing, digging, discovering, displaying, disapproving, distributing, editing, The behaviours which employers require are known as competencies. eliminating, enforcing, establishing, estimating, evaluating, examining, expanding, experimenting, explaining, expressing, extracting, filing, forecasting, formulating, founding, generating, getting, giving, guiding, handling, Many companies or departments arrange these into a competency framework. illustrating, imaging, implementing, improving, increasing, influencing, integrating, interpreting, investigating, judging, keeping, maintaining, making, managing, manipulating, memorising, modelling, observing, operating, Listed below are six of the most common competencies reported by companies as being included in their organising perceiving piloting, planning, predicting, preparing, prescribing, privatising, problem-solving, competency framework, in a survey carried out by the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development. processing, programming, projecting, promoting, reading, providing, publicising, questioning, raising, reading, reasoning, receiving, recommended, reconciling, recording, reducing, referring, remembering, representing, Match some of your skills from your skills audit with the competencies below. You should have skills researching, responding, restoring, retrieving, reviewing, risking, scheduling, surging, selecting, sensing, which will link to at least 5 of the 6 competencies. separating, setting-up, shaping, sharing, solving, sorting, summarising, supplying, symbolising, synergising, taking, instructions, telling, updating, undertaking, unifying, upgrading, using, verbalising, weighing, winning, working, writing. communication skills My Top Ten 1. people management 2. 3. team skills 4. 5. customer service skills 6. 7. results orientation 8. 9. problem-solving 10. Remember: Each company that uses competencies will have its own framework. 20 21
  19. 19. Autumn Autumn Activity 8: Getting Into the Detail Demonstrating Competency 1 Employers ask the following questions: Area of competence communication skills • Can the individual do the work? Skills included • Do they have the correct skills, knowledge and behaviour needed to become a successful mem- ber of the team? • How will they fit with existing employees? In previous activities you have completed your skills audit and linked your skills with the competencies that employers will require. Specificexample However, it is important that you are able to prove to prospective employers that you have such com- petencies. In order to do this, many employers will want you to write or describe specific occasions or situations where you have demonstrated that you have the competencies they require. These are known as ‘key achievements’ and they can be important elements within a CV or during an interview. Think about your current or a recent position. Considering your own skills and a prospective employ- er’s competency framework, note particular occasions where you have demonstrated the behaviours required in each particular competence area. Have a look at the example below. This example would be for someone working at a clerical level. For more senior roles including management, each example would need to be more complex and possibly demonstrated over a sustained period. Demonstrating Competency 2Demonstrating Competency (example) Area of competence people managementArea of competence Customer service skills Skills includedSkills included telephone work - dealing with difficult customers - building empathy - logging information - computer skills - clarifying information - agreeing timescales - organisational skills - taking ownershipSpecificexample Recently dealt with Mrs Jones who was very irate. I listened to Specificexample her complaint patiently, writing down the details and asked questions in order to gain a precise understanding of the issue. I agreed to telephone her within a set timescale. I then investi- gated the complaint and called her back. The outcome was a letter of thanks from Mrs Jones. 22 23
  20. 20. Autumn AutumnDemonstrating Competency 3 Demonstrating Competency 5Area of competence team skills Area of competence result-orientation (plans, prioritises delivers on time)Skills included Skills includedSpecificexample SpecificexampleDemonstrating Competency 4 Demonstrating Competency 6Area of competence customer service skills Area of competence problem-solvingSkills included Skills includedSpecificexample Specificexample 24 25
  21. 21. Autumn AutumnPersonal Experience Activity: Personal experience continuedThere are many areas of experience which can be drawn upon when building an experience log. List key points from the exercises oppositeThis information can be used to support your CV and covering letters to prospective employers. Key points from your answers Skills or abilities demonstrated Where these might be useful inIt may also be useful during interviews, telephone conversations and networking events. your working life Activity 9: Personal Experience 1. Answer the following questions and then transfer the key points of your answers to the table opposite. 1. How you spend your leisure time? 2. 2. Do you prefer to spend time alone or do you like to have people around you? 3. Outside of work, what do you feel are your main achievements? 3. 4. Again, outside of work, what do you think will be your greatest challenges over the next six months? 5. Write a short motivational slogan or personal motto. 4. Hints and Tips Check that you have used positive language. 26 27
  22. 22. Autumn AutumnSelf-awareness Activity 10: Knowing Myself 1. What are your strengths? “He who knows others is wise. He who knows himself is enlightened.” Lao Tzu 2. What are your weaknesses?Self-awareness is useful to us throughout our lives and the ability to self-reflect is particularly useful duringpersonal change and transition. Self-awareness includes a recognition of our personality, our strengths andweaknesses, our likes and dislikes.Self-awareness can help individuals to recognise personal stresses and pressures. It is also often a prerequi- 3. How do your friends describe you?site for effective communication and interpersonal relations, as well as for developing empathy.In simple terms, self-awareness is about trying to understand who we really are and why we do the thingswe do and how we do them. By becoming more self-aware we can gain a greater degree of control overhow we are operating in the present, instead of reacting to something conditioned by our past. 4. Do you agree with their descriptions? Why or why not?Listed below are some of the benefits of increasing your self-awareness: • gain more control • be more flexible and confident in our approach 5. List two situations when you are most at ease. • help ourselves to deal with challenges in a more positive and less anxious way • interact better, communicate more effectively, and understand our relationships with others more fully 6. What specific elements were present when you felt that way? • make better decisions • reduce our stress levels • get more out of life. 7. What types of activities did you enjoy doing when you were a child? 8. What about now? 9. What motivates you? Why? 28 29
  23. 23. Autumn Autumn Activity: Knowing Myself continued Activity 11: Parts of Myself 10. What are your dreams for the future? Start recognising different ‘parts of yourself ’. We are made up of many different feelings, thoughts and behaviours which change according to our surroundings. It can be helpful to think beforehand about the way you might respond to a given situation. 11. What steps are you taking to achieve your dreams? Think about body language and those other subtle messages that are sent and picked up. If we are with someone, what are we communicating through our behaviour? Do we try too hard? Are we diffident or disinterested or do we appear confident and comfortable? Think about your responses to a particular situation. 12. What do you fear most in your life? Why? 1. What situation are you thinking about? 13. What stresses you? 14. What is your typical response to stress? 2. What patterns can you identify in your behaviour? 15. What qualities do you like to see in people? Why? 3. Is your behaviour consistent in situations like this? If not, how does your behaviour vary? 16. Do you have many friends as you just described? Why or why not? 17. When you disagree with someone’s viewpoint, what would you do? 4. Thinking about your answer to question 3, how predictable are your responses? 30 31
  24. 24. Autumn AutumnValues and Needs The Five Levels in Maslow’s Hierarchy of NeedsOur needs and values relate to who we are and they are affected by our life experiences. They change as 1. Physiological Needswe grow older in order to reflect our experiences in different stages of our lives.There is typically a growth These include the most basic needs that are vital to survival, such as the need for water, air, foodin autonomy and as we age further still, achievement may become less important. and sleep. Maslow believed that these are the most basic and instinctive needs in the hierarchy as others remain secondary until they are met.Psychologist Abraham Maslow first introduced a hierarchy of needs in 1943. The hierarchy is often dis-played as a five level pyramid, with basic needs such as food, water and sleep at its base. Once these aresatisfied, the individual moves upwards through the various levels. 2. Security Needs These include needs for safety and security. Security needs are important for survival, but theyThe diagram below illustrates the five levels. At certain points in our lives we can revert to a lower level of are not as demanding as the physiological needs. Examples of security needs include a desire forneed. Situations such as redundancy or loss are examples of times when this need to cover the basics can secure employment, health insurance, safe neighbourhoods and shelter from the environment.come into play.Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs 3. Social Needs These are the needs for belonging, love and affection. Maslow considered them to be less basic than physiological and security needs. Friendships, romantic attachments and families help fulfil this need for companionship and acceptance, as does involvement in social, community or reli- gious groups. Self- 4. Esteem Needs actualisation Once the first three needs have been satisfied, esteem needs becomes increasingly important. These include the need for things that reflect on self-esteem, personal worth, social recognition and accomplishment. Esteem Needs 5. Self-actualizing Needs This is the highest level of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Self-actualization people are self-aware, interested in personal growth, less affected by the opinions of others and more concerned with the fulfilment their potential. Social Needs Our values can be seen as the manifestation of our needs. In reality, our lives are more often than not lived concurrently at a number of levels. Safety and Security Understanding your values can help you to: • plan your next career move • select the position and work which is most appropriate for you Physiological Needs • understand the type of people with whom you like to associate • allocate your resources (finances and time) so you can achieve personal satisfaction. 32 33
  25. 25. Autumn AutumnActivity 12: My Values Value 0-3 4-7 8 - 10In order to help you identify your values and prioritise those which are of most important to you, we Peace: To have a low pressure environmenthave listed some value areas below. If you think of others just add them or amend those we have written.Score each value in order of importance to you; High (8-10), Medium (4-7) or Low (0-3). Place of work To provide social lifeTypically, people start ranking most as High or Medium. If you find you do this, go through them again, Recognition: To have statusrepeating the exercise until you get at least 5 in each category. Service: To help others in society Value 0-3 4-7 8 - 10 Variety : To have employment that has variety and change Accomplishment: To achieve or to reach the top Growth: To achieve your full potential Affiliation: To be accepted or liked by others Health: To be fit and well Autonomy: To direct your own priorities Independence: To be able to work on your own initiative Challenge: To stretch your ability. Integrity: To be honest and moral Competence: To be respected for your ability Leadership: To influence others Competition: To be in a competitive environment Location: To live where you want Expertise: To be a expert Money: To earn a high salary Faith: To have a belief in God Family: To spend time with family Pleasure: To have fun Finance: To be financially independent Peace: To have a low pressure environment Growth: To achieve your full potential Place of work: To provide social life Health: To be fit and well Recognition: To have status Independence: To be able to work on your own initiative Service: To help others in society Integrity: To be honest and moral Variety: To have employment that has variety and change Leadership: To influence others Location: To live where you want Money: To earn a high salary Pleasure: To have fun 34 35
  26. 26. Autumn Autumn Activity 13: My Highest Scoring Values Activity 15:Learning Log 1. A learning log is a useful way to record and later review the progress you are making in your career and personal development. 2. We suggest you use the log as a record of your thoughts, feelings and actions as you progress your job search. The log is also useful in career development. 3. It can help you to: • Reflect on previous work experiences 4. • Review successful and unsuccessful job applications • Further refine and develop future goals 5. You can use it as a record of your applications. You may only want to include key career points, when applying for a new job or when reflecting at the end of a particular period of time. The learning log can provide a valuable tool in your personal and career development. You can also use the log to record where and when CV’s have been sent to prospective employers. Activity 14: When I’m 64 You may also like to score the table above as if you were at a different point in your life, perhaps adding or removing 10, 15 or 20 years. Here is an example to get you started: Date 12 April Action Searched the internet for jobs that would suit my skills and that I think I 1. What differences do you see? would enjoy. Learning Found a couple of jobs but they’re not in my area. Actions for the I need to find out what extra qualifications I might need to be able to apply future 2. Which areas remain constant? for jobs like these. How I will do this 1. Call in at the local college and speak to someone. 3. How does looking into the future change the scores? 2. Look in the local papers to see if there are jobs like that round here. 3. Get advice from the job centre Timescale Over the next two weeks. 36 37
  27. 27. Autumn Autumn Learning Log Learning Log Date Date Action Action Learning Learning Actions for the future Actions for the future How I will do this How I will do this Timescale Timescale 38 39
  28. 28. Autumn Autumn Learning Log Learning Log Date Date Action Action Learning Learning Actions for the future Actions for the future How I will do this How I will do this Timescale Timescale 40 41
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  30. 30. WinterChange and Transition “Everybody has a world, and that world is completely hid- den until we begin to inquire. As soon as we do, that entire world opens to us and yields itself.” David GutersonWithin the winter season there are things which are hidden from view or under the surface, not alwaysobvious or conscious. The activities within this section are designed to challenge your ways of looking at sit-uations and information. We begin with a financial audit designed to allow you to identify and take controlof your expenditure. We then go on to introduce you to some of the research and information availablein relation to topics such as change and individual differences. Winter Questions Areas Explored Change and Transition The effects of transition, the change curve, Becoming able to implement Do I understand my financial position? the skills required to cope with new decisions and deal with the con- How will I cope with change? situations. Gathering information, com- sequences, using relevant skills How satisfied am I? munication skills and interpersonal skills, and tactics How can I influence others? budgetary skills. 43
  31. 31. WInter WInterFinancial Planning My Financial PlannerDuring times of change such as redundancy or retirement, individuals often begin to assess their finances. On the following two pages we have set up a six-monthly financial planner for you to complete.They tend to plan and analyse their current situation more closely. For the purposes of this activity, the terms running down the left hand column are defined as follows:Try to think of your financial planning as if you were running your own business. You may already have afirm hold and understanding of your finances and may not feel that this section is relevant. If you already Incomeplan your finances, much of this will be familiar. Net Salaries family salaries, redundancy payments, benefitsIf you do not, we would suggest that you look at your current outgoings (expenditure) in comparison with Others any tax refunds bonuses, assetsyour current income. You will be able to produce a budget planner. This will allow you to get a betterunderstanding of what your day-to-day life is costing. OutgoingsFor most people their salary is the major form of income. However, identifying salary requirements is often Transport car purchase, fuel, service/MOT, road tax, repair/tyres, bus/tube/rail-farecarried out with little planning. Household water rates, council tax, gas, electricity, telephone, TV licenceWe are not suggesting you plan your annual expenditure to within £5, but maybe trying to be within £200would be helpful. By using a budget planner, like the one over the page, you can get a better understand- Insurance contents, building, life policies, medical, car, pensioning of what life costs. This can help you decide whether you want to raise your income, or whether thebalance between your income and expenditure is right for you. Of course, an increase in salary would Job search equipment, postage, paper, phone calls, internet rentalprobably bring a greater commitment to work, either in terms of hours or responsibility.This may adverselyaffect your work-life balance. House /Garden maintenance, alterations, DIY, central heating, furniture etc, garden tools, plants, domestic appliances, maintenance and replacement Holidays fares, insurance, hotels, car hire, entertainment, gifts Social dining out, entertainment clubs, etc Dependents allowances, gifts, maintenance payments, birthday and Christmas presents Personal clothes, hobbies, gifts, charity, medical, dental/optician, other subscriptions and fees Other bank charges, contingencies or any other expenses which are not covered within another category 44 45
  32. 32. WInter WInter Activity 16: My Six-Monthly Financial Planner Months Months Budget v Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget v Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual Income Income Net Salaries Net Salaries Dividends/Interest Dividends/Interest Other Other Income Total Income Total Outgoings Outgoings Mortgage/Rent Mortgage/Rent Loans/HP/Credit Loans/HP/Credit Household Household Insurance Insurance Transport Transport Job Search Job Search Garden Garden Food Food Holidays Holidays Social Social Dependents Dependents Personal Personal Mobile phone Mobile phone Other Other Outgoings Total Outgoings Total Bank opening balance Bank opening balance Bank closing balance Bank closing balance 46 47
  33. 33. WInter WInter Activity 17: My Financial Planning Financial Hints and Tips In the space below, write some notes about what you discovered from your financial planning over six Look for simple ways to save money. months. Were there any great surprises (good or bad!)? Were there areas where you thought you were going to spend much more (or less) than you actually did? Where were the biggest outgoings? Over the Try to get into the habit of planning your budget over a period of time in the way you did on the previ- next six months or year, what changes might you want to make? ous page. It is a good idea to monitor this kind of plan on a regular basis. Before buying something, ask yourself the following questions: • Is it a necessity? Do I really need it? • Is it more important to spend money on this than on the other things I need to pay for? • What savings could I make in order to pay for it? Speak to an independent financial adviser from a reputable company. This will help you to review your total financial picture. Check the Inland Revenue website and that of your local council. You may qualify for a tax rebate or a reduction in your council tax bill. If you have credit cards or loans, calculate how long it will take to pay off the debt and how much inter- est will be charged. If at all possible, stop using credit cards unless their interest rate is at zero percent or if you can afford to pay the balance on request. Try to get into the habit of clearing your credit card bal- ance at the end of each month. Then you won’t pay any interest at all! Use the internet to check rates and charges for product and services. Remember to budget for Christmas, birthday presents and other incidental expenses. 48 49

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