Successfully reported this slideshow.
New Data on Clinician Learning:
What does it mean for your programs

Brian S. McGowan, PhD
Co-Founder & Chief Learning Off...
Today: A Story with Three Acts
Review three recent data sets that shed light
on how clinicians learn
1.
2.
3.

Clinician l...
Act One:

Clinician learning and social media
How are clinicians leveraging new media
in meaningful ways to support their
...
Act One:

Question #1
What percentage of docs are using Twitter
as a lifelong learning platform?
1. 7%
2.17%
3.37%
4.57%
5...
Question #2
What percentage of docs are using
restricted online networks as a lifelong
learning platform?
1. 1%
2.21%
3.51...
Question #3
What percentage of physicians believe
learning through social media could improve
the quality of the care they...
Problem: Despite all the recent buzz around the
emergence of social media in healthcare, we
have little definitive data on...
Methods
IRB-approved survey:
•

Developed using theoretical framework, previous literature, and
input from advisory board....
Physician adoption and use of social media to
support their lifelong learning is varied

http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
Is learning through social media a waste
of time or an essential use of time?

Primary Care Physicians

18%

Oncologists

...
Is social media a source of low quality or
high quality information?
Primary Care Physicians

17%

Oncologists

20%

All r...
Physicians believe learning through
social media improves their patient care
Using Social Media helps improve
the quality ...
Act Two:

Clinician learning and
preferences for CME
What trends exist in how clinicians expect to
participate in CME in 2...
Act Two:

Question #4
What are the basic trends in clinician CME
preferences?
1. A

trend away from live CME Meetings

2.A...
Question #5
What percentage of clinicians believe their
participation with online CME will decrease
on the next 12 months?...
Problem: Educational designs must include a
rationale for delivering content in ways that
learners prefer, but we have lit...
Methods
Needs Assessment Surveys:
•

In partnership with AcademicCME, a series of surveys
were distributed to a nearly 10,...
Increasing Demand Among Clinicians
for Online Learning and Virtual Courses
In the coming year what changes do you expect a...
These trends persist regardless of specialty…

19
These trends persist regardless of practice location

20
Clinicians view live meetings and
online CME as distinctly effective
On a scale of 1-10 (1 = wholly ineffective, 10 = whol...
But in a broader sense clinicians seem to feel
underwhelmed by CME and other practice support tools
On a scale of 1-10 (1 ...
Act Three:

Clinician learning and
the natural learning actions
Have we simplified the process of learning such that
clini...
Act Three:

Question #6
When it comes to the learning overall, what
grade would you give your learners?
1. A
2.B
3.C

No ‘...
Question #7
When it comes to participating in CME, what
percentage of physicians identify as
'notetakers'?
1. 15%
2.45%
3....
Question #8
What grade would you give yourself when it
comes to reflecting and re-exposing yourself
to your own learning n...
Problem: While educational planners are
increasingly leveraging adult learning theory
into their planning, they continue t...
Methods
Semi-structured interviews
• More than 200 interview were conducted with clinicians, medical
educators, residents,...
Emergence of The Natural Learning Actions

4 Natural Learning Actions

Note Taking

Reminders

Learning
Search

ArcheMedX ...
Natural Learning Actions: Note Taking
4 Natural Learning Actions

Note Taking

Reminders

Learning
Search

ArcheMedX Blog:...
Natural Learning Actions: Reminders
4 Natural Learning Actions

Note Taking

Reminders

Learning
Search

ArcheMedX Blog: h...
Natural Learning Actions: Search
4 Natural Learning Actions

Note Taking

Reminders

Learning
Search

ArcheMedX Blog: http...
Natural Learning Actions: Social
4 Natural Learning Actions

Note Taking

Reminders

Learning
Search

Social

While engagi...
New Data on
Clinician Learning:
What’s it mean for your
programs

By:
Brian S. McGowan, PhD
Co-Founder & Chief Learning Of...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

New clinician learning data what does it mean for your medical education programs - final 102413

636 views

Published on

Slides from a Webinar which took place on October 24th, 2013

Published in: Education, Business
  • Be the first to like this

New clinician learning data what does it mean for your medical education programs - final 102413

  1. 1. New Data on Clinician Learning: What does it mean for your programs Brian S. McGowan, PhD Co-Founder & Chief Learning Officer (direct) 267-603-2510 or brian@ArcheMedX.com
  2. 2. Today: A Story with Three Acts Review three recent data sets that shed light on how clinicians learn 1. 2. 3. Clinician learning and social media Clinician learning and preferences for CME Clinician learning and the natural learning actions Explore through interview and Q & A how these data may impact your educational programs 2
  3. 3. Act One: Clinician learning and social media How are clinicians leveraging new media in meaningful ways to support their lifelong learning? 3
  4. 4. Act One: Question #1 What percentage of docs are using Twitter as a lifelong learning platform? 1. 7% 2.17% 3.37% 4.57% 5.I have no idea 4
  5. 5. Question #2 What percentage of docs are using restricted online networks as a lifelong learning platform? 1. 1% 2.21% 3.51% 4.71% 5.I have no idea 5
  6. 6. Question #3 What percentage of physicians believe learning through social media could improve the quality of the care they provide? 1. 10% 2.20% 3.40% 4.60% 5.I have no idea 6
  7. 7. Problem: Despite all the recent buzz around the emergence of social media in healthcare, we have little definitive data on ‘meaningful use’ of social media by healthcare professionals… http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
  8. 8. Methods IRB-approved survey: • Developed using theoretical framework, previous literature, and input from advisory board. Surveys were pilot tested using cognitive interview process prior to implementation Distribution: • Surveys were distributed by email to a random selected sample of US oncologists and primary care physicians. Target groups and sample size: • US Oncologists (n=186) & US Primary Care Physicians (n=299) Response Rate: • 485 responses were analyzed for a response rate = 27% http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
  9. 9. Physician adoption and use of social media to support their lifelong learning is varied http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
  10. 10. Is learning through social media a waste of time or an essential use of time? Primary Care Physicians 18% Oncologists 49% 22% All respondents 45% 20% 0% Waste of time http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/ 33% 33% 47% 20% Neutral 40% 33% 60% 80% Essential use of time 100%
  11. 11. Is social media a source of low quality or high quality information? Primary Care Physicians 17% Oncologists 20% All respondents 50% 18% 0% 52% 28% 51% 20% Low quality http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/ 32% 40% Neutral 31% 60% High quality 80% 100%
  12. 12. Physicians believe learning through social media improves their patient care Using Social Media helps improve the quality of my patient care Using Social Media enables me to care for patients more effectively 7% 8% 6% 17% 6% 11% 5% Using Social Media increases my job productivity 7% Using Social Media improves my job performance 7% 9% 6% 11% 17% 9% 8% Using Social Media enables me to accomplish job tasks more effectively 13% 0% 29% 28% 11% 20% 22% 23% 20% 18% 40% 22% 19% 24% 26% 60% 10% 10% 20% 23% 7% 24% 7% 80% Strongly Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neither Agree or Disagree Somewhat Agree Agree Strongly Agree http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/ 6% 100%
  13. 13. Act Two: Clinician learning and preferences for CME What trends exist in how clinicians expect to participate in CME in 2014? 13
  14. 14. Act Two: Question #4 What are the basic trends in clinician CME preferences? 1. A trend away from live CME Meetings 2.A trend towards (traditional) Online CME 3.A trend towards Online Virtual Course 4.All 5.I of the above have no idea 14
  15. 15. Question #5 What percentage of clinicians believe their participation with online CME will decrease on the next 12 months? 1. 3% 2.13% 3.33% 4.53% 5.I have no idea 15
  16. 16. Problem: Educational designs must include a rationale for delivering content in ways that learners prefer, but we have little comparative evidence to support these planning decisions… http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
  17. 17. Methods Needs Assessment Surveys: • In partnership with AcademicCME, a series of surveys were distributed to a nearly 10,000 subscribers to Elsevier Journals and past participants of Elseviersponsored CE activities • Each survey targeted a unique audience of learners • A core set of questions was carried across all surveys and all audiences • Participation in the surveys was incentivized by Elsevier Sample Size • 801 responses were received across more than a dozen specialties and healthcare professions
  18. 18. Increasing Demand Among Clinicians for Online Learning and Virtual Courses In the coming year what changes do you expect as it relates to your participation in medical education? (N=801) 70% 60% More 60% Less 57% 56% 50% Same 53% 47% 40% 44% 41% 41% 38% 40% 30% 25% 20% 22% 21% 16% 14% 10% 3% 11% 9% 0% Traditional Online Online virtual courses Local CME meetings CME (cases, videos, (prolonged, cohortwebinars, etc.) based learning) National CME meetings International CME Mobile CME activities meetings (using smart phones or tablets)
  19. 19. These trends persist regardless of specialty… 19
  20. 20. These trends persist regardless of practice location 20
  21. 21. Clinicians view live meetings and online CME as distinctly effective On a scale of 1-10 (1 = wholly ineffective, 10 = wholly effective) please describe how effective you find each of the following. (N=801) 7.50 7.30 7.10 6.90 6.70 6.50 CME meetings Online CME Broad guideline Practice support Patient Team-based dissemination tools education tools care efforts (coordination) tools
  22. 22. But in a broader sense clinicians seem to feel underwhelmed by CME and other practice support tools On a scale of 1-10 (1 = wholly ineffective, 10 = wholly effective) please describe how effective you find each of the following. (N=801) 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 CME meetings Online CME Broad guideline Practice Patient Team-based dissemination support tools education tools care efforts (coordination) tools 22
  23. 23. Act Three: Clinician learning and the natural learning actions Have we simplified the process of learning such that clinicians can efficiently and effectively learn? 23
  24. 24. Act Three: Question #6 When it comes to the learning overall, what grade would you give your learners? 1. A 2.B 3.C No ‘right’ answer 4.D 5.F 24
  25. 25. Question #7 When it comes to participating in CME, what percentage of physicians identify as 'notetakers'? 1. 15% 2.45% 3.65% 4.85% 5.I have no idea 25
  26. 26. Question #8 What grade would you give yourself when it comes to reflecting and re-exposing yourself to your own learning notes? 1. A 2.B 3.C No ‘right’ answer 4.D 5.F 26
  27. 27. Problem: While educational planners are increasingly leveraging adult learning theory into their planning, they continue to assume learners know how to learn… http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
  28. 28. Methods Semi-structured interviews • More than 200 interview were conducted with clinicians, medical educators, residents, and medical students Interview model • A scenario was designed to understand the process of learning as it relates to engaging with new ideas or practices within the context of a CME activity • Subjects were asked what actions they take in response to new ideas or practices and how they ensure that this new information was transferred to extend their knowledge or impact their practice Qualitative research analyses and conclusions • As themes emerged the interview model was refined and eventually future interviews were used to validate the original themes http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
  29. 29. Emergence of The Natural Learning Actions 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt Social Four basic learning actions were uncovered Clinician learners acknowledged that learning experiences that failed to support these learning actions were ‘hit or miss at best’ 29
  30. 30. Natural Learning Actions: Note Taking 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt Social 85% of clinician leaners selfidentified as notetakers. Clinicians struggle to overcome a jerryrigged system of notebooks, index cards, post-its, and spare paper/pads. 30
  31. 31. Natural Learning Actions: Reminders 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt Social Clinician learners acknowledged that an inability to reflect on notes and lessons undermines their ability to learn and take action They lack a simplified system for reexposure and reflection 31
  32. 32. Natural Learning Actions: Search 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt Social Clinician learners constantly raise new questions as they engage with the primary lesson content. Searching for new information is distracting given current learning environments. 32
  33. 33. Natural Learning Actions: Social 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search Social While engaging with content learners look to others to not only ask questions, but to validate their own learning actions (how/when they take notes, set reminders, and search). This is a subtle new form of social learning. ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt 33
  34. 34. New Data on Clinician Learning: What’s it mean for your programs By: Brian S. McGowan, PhD Co-Founder & Chief Learning Officer (direct) 267-603-2510 or brian@ArcheMedX.com Questions and Answers

×