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Communicating Culture The museum experience
Information: what did you find out about the museum experience? <ul><li>Definitions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. a.   Ancient ...
Examples of Museums <ul><li>Arboretums. </li></ul><ul><li>Art galleries/museums. </li></ul><ul><li>General museums. </li><...
Museums and their Function <ul><li>One role of museums:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>assembling objects and maintaining them wit...
Historical Periods <ul><li>Six periods of natural history museum development according to Whitehead (1990). </li></ul><ul>...
World View Periods <ul><li>According to Hooper-Greenhill (1992) there were three distinct periods of museum development: <...
The Renaissance Period Kunstkammer of Frans Franken the Younger (early 17 th  century). Paintings, figurines, shells, drie...
The Renaissance Period <ul><li>Museum of Francesco Calzolari (Verona, 1622). </li></ul>
The Renaissance Period <ul><li>(Museum of Olaus Worm, Leiden, 1655). From Whitaker 1996. </li></ul>
What does the ‘Tradescant musaeum’ represent? <ul><li>The natural and artificial world </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These were co...
What is the nature of museums? <ul><li>Lidchi (1997: 159) highlights the following important points about the nature of mu...
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The Museum Experience

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The Museum Experience

  1. 1. Communicating Culture The museum experience
  2. 2. Information: what did you find out about the museum experience? <ul><li>Definitions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. a. Ancient Hist. (Usu. in form Museum .) In the ancient Hellenic world: a building connected with or dedicated to the Muses or the arts inspired by them; a university building, esp. that established at Alexandria by Ptolemy Soter c 280 B.C. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>     b. gen. A building, or part of a building, dedicated to the pursuit of learning or the arts; a scholar's study. Also in extended use. Obs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. a. A building or institution in which objects of historical, scientific, artistic, or cultural interest are preserved and exhibited. Also: the collection of objects held by such an institution. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>     b. In extended use (usu. derogatory ): any large or motley collection of things, esp. outmoded or useless ones; the repository of such a collection. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Examples of Museums <ul><li>Arboretums. </li></ul><ul><li>Art galleries/museums. </li></ul><ul><li>General museums. </li></ul><ul><li>Encyclopaedic museums. </li></ul><ul><li>Historic building or sites. </li></ul><ul><li>Preservation projects. </li></ul><ul><li>Herbariums. </li></ul><ul><li>Zoological garden. </li></ul><ul><li>Aquariums. </li></ul><ul><li>Planetariums </li></ul><ul><li>Children's museums </li></ul><ul><li>Nature centre/ visitor’s centres. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Museums and their Function <ul><li>One role of museums: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>assembling objects and maintaining them within a specific intellectual environment (world view). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This statement is pertinent in tracing the history of museums because world views change over time. </li></ul><ul><li>A world view is an implicit (rational) manner by which a society perceives its surroundings and functions within its surroundings. </li></ul><ul><li>Museum development can be divided into six phases corresponding to shifts in world view. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Historical Periods <ul><li>Six periods of natural history museum development according to Whitehead (1990). </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Greco-Roman Period (to 400 A.D.). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-Renaissance Period (400-1400). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Renaissance Period (1400-1600). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-Linnaean Period (1600-1750). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Linnaean Period (1750-1850). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Modern Period (1850-present). </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. World View Periods <ul><li>According to Hooper-Greenhill (1992) there were three distinct periods of museum development: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Renaissance Episteme 1400-1600. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Classical Episteme 1600-1750 = Pre-Linnaean Period. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Modern Episteme 1750-present = Linnaean + Modern periods. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>[An episteme is a world view.] </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Renaissance Period Kunstkammer of Frans Franken the Younger (early 17 th century). Paintings, figurines, shells, dried fishes, and other natural and human Productions were brought together to represent the world. (From Hooper- Greenhill, 1992).
  8. 8. The Renaissance Period <ul><li>Museum of Francesco Calzolari (Verona, 1622). </li></ul>
  9. 9. The Renaissance Period <ul><li>(Museum of Olaus Worm, Leiden, 1655). From Whitaker 1996. </li></ul>
  10. 10. What does the ‘Tradescant musaeum’ represent? <ul><li>The natural and artificial world </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These were collections with encyclopaedic ambition, intended as a miniature version of the universe, containing specimens of every category of things and helping render visible the totality of the universe, which otherwise would remain hidden from human eyes. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(Pomian, 1990. Cited in Hall, 1997: 158) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  11. 11. What is the nature of museums? <ul><li>Lidchi (1997: 159) highlights the following important points about the nature of museums: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Representation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Classification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interpretation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>‘ a museum does not solely deal with objects but, more importantly, with what we could call, … ideas – notions of what the world is or should be.’ (ibid: 160) </li></ul>

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