Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Events for public relations - BUSA 40437

746 views

Published on

Public Relations Strategies & Tactics - Unit 16 Events
UCSD Extension BUSA 40437

  • Be the first to comment

Events for public relations - BUSA 40437

  1. 1. Public Relations Strategies and Tactics Tenth Edition Dennis L. Wilcox Glen T. Cameron This multimedia product and its contents are protected under copyright law. The following are prohibited by law: •any public performance or display, including transmission of any image over a network; •preparation of any derivative work, including the extraction, in whole or in part, of any images; •any rental, lease, or lending of the program. Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  2. 2. Chapter 16 Meetings and Events Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3. Chapter 16 Objectives       Know the logistics of organizing a meeting Plan a banquet, reception, or cocktail party Organize an open house, exhibit, or plant tour Understand the multiple aspects of organizing a convention Recognize the basic elements of a trade show Creatively think about promotional events that will attract attention Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  4. 4. A World Filled With Events “Events deliver face time between consumers and brands. They also introduce customers to new products” Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  5. 5. Economic Impact  The U.S. face-to-face meetings industry directly supports ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ 1.7 million jobs $263 billion in spending $106 billion contribution to GDP $60 billion in labor revenue $14.3 billion in federal tax revenue $11.3 billion in state and local tax revenue. With the country looking for effective ways to work its way out of a recession, the meetings industry plays a critical role in supporting jobs in communities across America, creating environments that foster innovation and business success.
  6. 6. Types of Events          Trade Shows Expos Festivals Sporting Incentive Meetings Conventions Educational Religious  Social  Fundraising  Marketing  Entertainment  Arts/Culture  Commercial  Promotional  Political
  7. 7. Keys to Success (Ernst & Young)         Is the event a good idea? Do we have the necessary skills to plan & run the event? Is the host community supportive? Do we have the infrastructure in the community? Can we get a venue at a price we can afford? Will the event attract an audience? Media? Is it financially viable? Are the success criteria reasonable?
  8. 8. Objectives  Are used to determine the “success” of the event in the evaluation process. ◦ i.e. size of audience, demographics of the audience, average expenditure of guests, sponsor recognition levels, sales of sponsor products, economic impact of event, profit.  SMART (specific, measurable, achievable {actionoriented}, realistic and time-related). ◦ To achieve attendance of at least 150 guests at the national Education conference on 31 March 2014 by sending a promotional email to all relevant Education Professionals within Australia by 30 November 2013.
  9. 9. Target Markets      Internal Owners Management Employees Members Unions      External Vendors Sponsors Attendees & Exhibitors Media Community
  10. 10. Timing and Timelines  Timing  Season  Day of week  Time of day  Duration  Timeline
  11. 11. Developing a Theme   Select a title and or theme before program content Link program, food, décor and entertainment to one central motif  Should ideally appeal to all senses (tactile, visual, auditory)  Should be linked to the purpose  Should be compatible with guest needs and consistent in all respects  Must be supported by décor, entertainment, lighting sound and special effects. (Guest costumes)
  12. 12. Room Design
  13. 13. Décor          What is already in the space? Plants and flowers Props Fabrics and linens Special effects Balloons Interactive Tents, chairs, tables How does it look in person vs. on film?
  14. 14. Entertainment Is it appropriate to the event? Research the history of the event to determine if music and/or entertainment was used in the past Interview event stakeholders for tastes Determine how it will be used to further the goals of the event Analyze the budget to determine available resources Review time frame for planning and production to determine if there is sufficient time for incorporating these elements into the event
  15. 15. Speakers    Well-prepared speakers rank #1 among attendees on the list of key meeting success factors Speakers rank #2 in the factors as to whether to attend a convention Types of speakers  Professional (fee) – subject expert & expert speaker  Volunteer – could be a member Speakers’ Bureau
  16. 16. Factors in Selecting a Venue            Potential to fulfill the purpose Ambience Time/dates available Access by public transportation Parking Seating capacity Features (such as stage) Proximity to accommodations & attractions Safety Permits Accessibility (ADA, load in)            Cost of décor, sound, lighting, labor Condition (rennovations) Logistics of setting up Food & beverage facilities Sustainability Size (Fire code) Branding opportunities Technical support & facilities (WiFi) Venue management Exclusive/Preferred Vendors Storage/Back of the house
  17. 17. Considerations       Overall selection strategy should be for the best possible fit with the client’s and audience’s needs at the lowest possible cost. What is there and what has to be brought in? Temper selection with rational decision making Check the venue web site Deal with the decision maker Your value to the property
  18. 18. Unconventional Venues       Parking lot Tunnel Museums Research facilities Orchard/vineyard Aquarium       Theaters Amusement park Park Zoo Warehouse Airport hangar
  19. 19. Challenges of Unconventional Venues        Power Restrooms Lighting Sound Layout Rentals Kitchen Facilities
  20. 20. Conventional Venues      Convention/Conference center Hotels Meeting facilities Banquet halls Facilities with meeting rooms and/or banquet halls
  21. 21. Ballroom accommodates up to 175 seated guests or 350 guests for nonseated event
  22. 22. Costs       Hourly or flat rates Any extras Taxes, gratuities Permits Vendors Upsells
  23. 23. Know When…..  To be flexible  Dates  Vendors  To be specific  Your criteria  When history matters  Alternating coasts  Type of venue  To get multiple bids
  24. 24. Do you need ….     Exclusive use of a multi-room facility Disclosure of who else will be in-house Disclosure of who will be near-by Run of the house
  25. 25. So pay close attention to       Condition of the grounds and parking. Condition of carpet, paint, and decor. Condition and appropriately sized draperies/skirting. Adequate room size and capacity to hold event. Flexibility to adjust room layout/tables. No visual obstructions within room.       Indoor lighting (flexibility to adjust/dim sections). Ability to control natural light. Limited noise distractions in hallways/behind walls. Event room away from kitchen. Nearby restroom access. Nearby medical access.
  26. 26. And be sure to read the fine print in the contract.        Attrition Cancellation Comp room policies Union facilities Credit and payment policies Security deposits How the room should be left
  27. 27. Food & Beverage  Consider 1. Why is the event being held? Business, networking, social 2. Will the event have a theme? 3. What are the demographics of the attendees? VIPs? 4. Will the event be formal or casual? 5. What type of service is preferred? (buffet, table service etc.) 6. Will entertainment or presentations take place during the event? 7. Will other scheduled activities precede or follow the event? 8. What is the event budget?
  28. 28. Meal Functions  Breakfast  Continental breakfast  Full breakfast buffet  English breakfast  Full, served breakfast  Refreshment breaks  Mid-morning, mid-afternoon  30 minutes minimum  Can be beverages only  Morning may be a substitute for breakfast  Per person, on consumption, bulk
  29. 29. Meal Functions  Luncheons  Takes 75 to 90 minutes otherwise pre-set  Luncheon buffets can include deli setups for boardrooms to hot buffets with a variety of options  Receptions  Alone or preceding dinner  Seating for 20-25%  Guests will average 7 HDOs in 1st hour  Groups of women or seniors eat less
  30. 30. Cost Saving Ideas       Ganging menus Small servings of high-end items Limit portion size Pass the food Box lunches Buffets do not necessarily save money  Special touches Napkin folds & linen China & silver Music Lighting
  31. 31. Gratuities  Tip is voluntary & given at the time of service. May be given in addition to gratuity or service charge  Gratuity is voluntary and added to a bill. Go entirely to staff.  Service charge is mandatory and an automatic amount added to bill to defray
  32. 32. Bar Options  Cash or No-Host Bar (tickets)  Consumption tends to be lower  Gratuity may or may not be included   Premium, Call, House Open or Hosted Bar  2-2.5 drinks for the 1st hour, 3-3.5 for 1.5  Pay per person, by the drink, by the bottle, limited consumption Tray pass and/or Signature drink Will people arrive all at once or trickle in?
  33. 33. Audio Visual  A/V has become more sophisticated and is rapidly evolving  Visual component is important because people learn better from graphics & text than from text alone
  34. 34. Audio Equipment  The audience needs to hear the information  Walk-in music can make a great first impression  Microphones Speaker Systems Recording Equipment  
  35. 35. Types of Suppliers            Airlines Audio/Visual Companies Convention Centers General Service Contractor Golf Courses Hotels Resorts Photographers Security Printers Phone/Internet Services         Attractions Convention/Visitors Bureaus Cruise Lines Facilitator/Speakers Ground Transportation Companies Intermediary/3rd Party Planners Destination Management Companies …And More!
  36. 36. Supplier Selection      Contractual agreements will delineate specific services, timelines, terms of delivery and payment Quality of service provided will be determined by the working relationship and ongoing communications Begin with request for proposal (RFP) which outlines specific requirement for the meeting or event Proposal would demonstrate how the supplier will fulfill those requirements Have candidates submit sample contracts
  37. 37. Types of Relationships  In-House Contractors There may be a surcharge or fee for bringing in outside vendors but at least get two other bids to compare rates Exclusive Contractors Designated by the facility as the only one authorized to provide service For example: catering, electrical, exhibitor services Discuss flexibility and possible addendums 
  38. 38. General Service Contractor (GSC)    Provides services for the trade show and exhibitors Savings to the planner can mean increased cost to the exhibitor Clarify all services to be provided Floor plans Exhibit service kit Booth drapery & ID signs Additional drapery for event Aisle carpet & cleaning Registration area for trade show Drayage (material handling) Storage of exhibit materials Labor for show services Graphics Labor Aisle signs Directional signage Décor & props Lounge area Hardwall for office Furniture On-site service desk
  39. 39. Group Meetings  Planning  The size and purpose of the meeting dictate the plan  Location  Seating  Facilities  Invitations Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  40. 40. Group Meetings cont…  Registration  Greeting  Name tags  Program  Speakers  Meals Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  41. 41. Planning Banquets      Food Room rental Bartenders Decorations and centerpieces Audiovisual requirements       Speaker fees Entertainment Photographers Invitations Tickets Marketing and promotion Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  42. 42. Planning Banquets cont…   Working with catering managers Logistics and timing Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  43. 43. Receptions and Cocktail Parties    Can precede luncheon or dinner Can be part of a reception Cost-effective way to celebrate achievements  Format:  Lasts up to 2 hours  Large room where most will stand and move freely  Appetizers and nonalcoholic beverages should also be served Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  44. 44. Open Houses and Plant Tours  Major factors to consider  Day/hour  Guests  Publicity  Vehicles  Reception  Focal Point  Restrooms  Safety  Routing  Guides  Explanation  Housekeeping and attire  Emergencies Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  45. 45. Conventions  Planning  Timing  Location  Facilities  Exhibits  Program  Recreation and Exhibits  Attendance  Administration Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  46. 46. Trade Shows    Exhibit booths Hospitality suites Pressroom and media relations Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  47. 47. Promotional Events   Using celebrities to attract attendance Planning and logistics  Traffic flow  Adequate restrooms  Signage  Security  Liability insurance Copyright © 2012, 2009, 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

×