Workshop Mindmapping

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Slides from Shaun Longstreet's presentation for the Teaching Learning and Technology Center at UC Irvine.

Published in: Technology, Education

Workshop Mindmapping

  1. 1. Mind-mapping / Concept Mapping Visual Approaches to Lecturing Friday, February 8, 2008 1
  2. 2. Agenda for Today’s Workshop Learning styles. What’s a mind-map? What’s a concept map? Mapping for teaching and learning. Friday, February 8, 2008 2
  3. 3. Types of learning • People have differing preferences for the way that they learn • While everyone can learn through any learning mode, everyone learns faster through their preferred mode Friday, February 8, 2008 3
  4. 4. Visual This preference includes the depiction of information in charts, graphs, flow charts, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices that instructors use to represent what could have been presented in words. Friday, February 8, 2008 4
  5. 5. Oral / Aural This perceptual mode describes a preference for information that is quot;heardquot;: lectures, tutorials, tapes, group discussion, speaking, web chat, talking things through. Friday, February 8, 2008 5
  6. 6. Kinesthetic Also known as ‘experiential’ learning. By definition, this modality refers to the quot;perceptual preference related to the use of experience and practice (simulated or real).quot; Friday, February 8, 2008 6
  7. 7. DISCUSSION What are some of the ways that you appeal to a variety of learning styles in your classroom? Friday, February 8, 2008 7
  8. 8. Mind-mapping • Created/promoted by Tony Buzan • Stress visualization as well as the written • Mind-mapping stresses tree-like structures and a radial hierarchy. Friday, February 8, 2008 8
  9. 9. Friday, February 8, 2008 9
  10. 10. Exercise 1 Let’s create a mind map that outlines the US federal government Friday, February 8, 2008 10
  11. 11. Concept Mapping • Developed in science education. • Is similar to mind-mapping, but there is more emphasis on highlighting relationships between elements. • Concept maps tend to be more systemic and formalized. Friday, February 8, 2008 11
  12. 12. Friday, February 8, 2008 12
  13. 13. Friday, February 8, 2008 13
  14. 14. Stages in Constructing a Concept Map 1. Brainstorming 2. Organizing 3. Layout 4. Linking 5. Revision Friday, February 8, 2008 14
  15. 15. Exercise 2 In groups, let’s create concept maps that explains how doctoral process works: from high school to first professorship. Friday, February 8, 2008 15
  16. 16. Brainstorming Stage • List as many terms and concepts associated with the question at hand. • Write them on Post-It Notes • Don’t worry about redundancy, relative importance or relationships Friday, February 8, 2008 16
  17. 17. Organizing Stage • Spread out Post-It Notes • Create groups and subgroups, try to emphasize hierarchies • Identify terms that represent higher categories and add them • Some concepts will fall into multiple categories, this will become important in the linking stage Friday, February 8, 2008 17
  18. 18. Layout Stage • Arrange items to represent collective understanding of the relationships and connections between groups • Try to maintain a consistent hierarchy • Place similar items closer together • Think of simple sentences that can show relationships between groups/items • Rearrange as necessary; your map will look different from other groups Friday, February 8, 2008 18
  19. 19. Linking Stage • Use lines with arrows to connect & show relationships between groups • Write a word or phrase beside/below each arrow to identify the relationship • One to several arrows can start or end on particularly important terms/concepts Friday, February 8, 2008 19
  20. 20. Revising Stage • Review your draft • Rearrange as needed; remove; simplify • Discuss any remaining issues • Think about colors, shapes or images you might want to use Friday, February 8, 2008 20
  21. 21. WAYS TO USE CONCEPT & MIND-MAPPING Friday, February 8, 2008 21
  22. 22. Using Mind/Concept Maps: Lectures An effective way to present theoretical information more visually A way to create an interactive environment Very useful for Socratic method or capturing class discussion Friday, February 8, 2008 22
  23. 23. Using Mind/Concept Maps: Assessment Concept maps are great tools for testing student learning Checks their ability to remember content but more importantly processes and relationships Friday, February 8, 2008 23
  24. 24. Using Mind/Concept Maps: Study Aids To help with complex lectures and/or readings, perhaps a concept map to demonstrate interconnectivity? It need not be complete, it can have blanks and these could be filled in as a homework or in- class assignment Friday, February 8, 2008 24
  25. 25. Questions? Friday, February 8, 2008 25
  26. 26. Mind-mapping / Concept Mapping Visual Approaches to Lecturing Friday, February 8, 2008 26

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