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  • Language Department Presentation

    1. 1. Language Department, 2009-2010 The Power of Many Voices Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    2. 2. Our 6 “W’s” Way” “Who” “Which Else” “What “Why” Next” “What “What” Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    3. 3. The “Who:” Who: Where: What: Autonomous University of Mercè Garcia Barcelona, B.A., M.A. Language Department Chair mgarcia@fessenden.org University of Barcelona, M.A. FLES/Lower School Spanish ISEP, B.A. Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Bari Rabine Washington University, B.A. FLES/Middle School Spanish brabine@fessenden.org Harvard University, Ed.M. Alberto Guzmán Inpahu College of Arts Sciences, Upper School Spanish aguzman@fessenden.org B.A. Olga DeGrasse Manhattanville College, B.A. Upper School Spanish odegrasse@fessenden.org Middlebury College, M.A. Bobbie Stevens Academic Tutoring Director Boston University, B.A. bstevens@fessenden.org Upper School Spanish Stacey Smalley FLES/Middle School Latin Union College, B.A., M.A.T. ssmalley@fessenden.org Upper School Latin Lilla Willey Northwestern University, B.A. Upper School Latin lwilley@fessenden.org Middlebury College, M.A. University of Notre Dame, B.A. Walter Kasinskas Harvard Univesity, M.T.S. Upper School Latin wkasinskas@fessenden.org Boston College, Ph.D.
    4. 4. The “Why” Our mission is to EMPOWER all students to become LIFE-LONG LANGUAGE LEARNERS with the KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS and ATTITUDES to compete successfully in a global society. Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next We subscribe to the belief that all students should learn a world language and that this instruction should begin as early as possible. It is our goal to prepare students using the best knowledge available regarding foreign language pedagogy and to adapt curriculum and methods to achieve success for the greatest number of students. Communication is at the heart of what we do. Proficiency and skills development are the foremost goals. We believe that the study of the language system itself, while useful for some students, does not automatically result in the development of the ability to process language in real situations. Most learners learn a language best when they are provided opportunities to use the target language to communicate in a wide range of activities. This is why teachers will use the target language as much as possible in class. Students are equally expected to use the language with the teacher, orally and in written work, as well as in paired or group activities to exchange information or solve problems. To be truly proficient in a language requires an understanding and appreciation of the peoples who speak the language studied. This cultural knowledge includes the typical products of culture, history, geography, literature and the arts as well as the common routines and features of everyday life. Knowledge of the target culture(s) as well as an understanding of how it compares to our own is essential for a well-rounded education. Foreign language, like other subject areas, prepares students for life-long learning. Efforts to make connections to the community, learn technology skills, and develop research abilities are valuable components of the curriculum.
    5. 5. The “Why” (cont.) Teachers are encouraged to make connections with other disciplines so that students may be challenged to use the higher order thinking skills of synthesis and analysis. Students are also able to take better ownership of the material as they add new facts and gain better understanding of the material as they view it from different Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next perspectives. With a diverse student body and the wide-range of course development and the teaching experience of our faculty, the Latin and Spanish sections of the Language Department establish the foundations for life-long language learning and cultural understanding. In our role as teachers of language and literature, we deal constantly with issues of identity and diversity. Therefore, our department is particularly well adapted to developing cross-cultural communication, internationalization and entrepreneurship among our students. Success is measured not only in the ability to speak, read and write the language of another culture, but also in the intellectual development of the individual as a whole. The Department of Languages prepares students for success on several levels. First and foremost, the study of foreign languages and literature is the foundation for critical thinking and communication. For the non-native student, our language courses develop the essential skills necessary to communicate in the target language and to gain access to another culture. For our Hispanic students who possess mainly an oral command of their language, we incorporate, within our Spanish classes, activities especially designed to improve their abilities in writing and reading. Second, by studying and learning another language, students learn about their own native language, its structures and syntax. It has been proven that second-language acquisition improves the student's communication skills in his own language. Third, our foreign literature and culture lessons introduce students to diversity of thought and experience, gaining perspective and deeper understanding of their own culture. Finally, the Language Department faculty, being so diverse, brings to the classroom a broad spectrum of knowledge and experience thus adding to students' understanding and enjoyment of the language.
    6. 6. The “What” Spanish Latin Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Progression of Progression of Courses Courses Course Course Description Description
    7. 7. Spanish Progression of Courses Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    8. 8. Spanish Progression of Courses Spanish Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next 5 FLES FLES FLES Spanish FLES FLES K 1 2 3 4 6 Spanish 5N Spanish 1 } } } Spanish 4 Spanish 3 Spanish 2 (upcoming 2010-2011) Honors Honors Spanish Spanish A student can be referred to 3 2 Introduction to Language if he has been waived* out of the language. *Waived, if referred by the skills center
    9. 9. Spanish Program Overview In the Lower School the emphasis on aural training and oral communication makes maximum use of the child’s natural ability to mimic at this age. Nursery rhymes, songs, stories, role-playing, art projects and games are used to teach elementary vocabulary such as colors, days of the week, Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next animals, seasons, and numbers. Children are encouraged to speak in full sentences, and are exposed to simple grammar through a method called Symtalk. This program uses the same type of verbal and visual memory techniques children experience when they first learned to speak. Vocabulary and sentence structure that is introduced initially with the Symtalk symbol cards is further developed in the Middle School as the 5th-6th grade program bridges the Symtalk program to the Realidades program used in the 6th grade and the Upper School. In addition to further developing students’ speaking and listening skills, in the Middle School there is greater emphasis on reading and writing and general grammar as the Realidades program in 6th grade provides more structured exercises and vocabulary study and is supplemented by two TPRS-style chapter books. The Upper School program continues the use of the Realidades series as students are exposed to more advanced linguistic work, including the study of past, future, and perfect tenses as well as the use of commands and a variety of writing and speaking styles, The 7th-9th grade curriculum takes advantage of students’ developing abilities in their native language to assess how languages function and to make connections between languages. As their writing abilities progress and students are demonstrating great accuracy in their work, there is also greater exposure to reading authentic materials in the target language through the use of several authentic texts. Click “here” to experience a Lower School lesson, “El Cuento del Pollito”
    10. 10. Latin Progression of Courses Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Click “here” to see the Latin presentation
    11. 11. Latin Progression of Courses Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next } } Latin I Latin II Latin III Latin 6 Latin I Latin II Latin III Honors Honors Honors A student can be referred to Click “here” to see Introduction to Language if he has been the Latin waived* out of the language. presentation *Waived, if referred by the skills center
    12. 12. Latin Program Overview Based on a text series which is both age- Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next appropriate and engaging, this multifaceted 3- year curriculum has two goals: mastery of both Latin and English grammar and translation and cultural-historical understanding of Ancient Rome. In related work students examine the significance of word parts and derivations in determining the meaning of words in Latin, English, and Romance languages. Students are also introduced to Roman mythology, culture and political and social history. The techniques used for presentation and reinforcement of material are varied in order to address a variety of learning styles.
    13. 13. The “Which Way” Text: Activities: Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Reading & Symtalk Realidades Role-Play Games Storytelling Ecce Hands-on Presentations Projects First Latin Romani Culture TPR Songs Video Technology Pen-Pals
    14. 14. Symtalk The Symtalk language-building system has a simple, but effective approach to learning language that delivers astonishing results Sample Sentences Development: K-5 immediately. Using the same type of verbal and visual memory Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next techniques children experience when they first learned to speak, Symtalk gets our students speaking and, in the process, helps Kindergarten: Pablo tiene un perro negro y blanco. them master vocabulary and sentence structure. As a result, student confidence in speaking soars! First Grade: Pablo tiene un perro negro y blanco. El perro come el pastel de Pablo. Symtalk workbooks ensure mastery of the core vocabulary and structure through recycling exercises that progress in difficulty. Second Grade: Pablo tiene un perro negro y blanco. El perro come el pastel de Pablo. Pablo tiene hambre porque el perro come su pastel. Symbol cards are at the core of the system, which represent all parts of speech. Teachers introduce vocabulary and sentence structure when the symbol cards are placed in sequence on a Third Grade: Pablo tiene un perro negro y blanco. El perro come el magnetic board. Students read and “speak” the visuals, create pastel de Pablo. Pablo tiene hambre porque el perro come su pastel. new sentences, and build fluency and proficiency. Pablo tiene hambre y quiere una hamburguesa. Symtalk games foster communicative proficiency and listening Fourth Grade: Pablo tiene un perro negro y blanco. El perro come el skills in contexts students care about. pastel de Pablo. Pablo tiene hambre porque el perro come su pastel. Pablo tiene hambre y quiere una hamburguesa. Pablo necesita ir a la tienda para comprar la hamburguesa. The symbol cards, workbooks, and games complement each other and lead to the same goal: students will speak in complex sentences while fully understanding what they read, hear, write, Fifth Grade: Pablo tiene un perro negro y blanco. El perro come el and say. pastel de Pablo.Pablo tiene hambre porque el perro come el pastel. Pablo iene hambre y quiere una hamburguesa. Pablo necesita ir a la tienda para comprar la hamburguesa. Pablo no compra la hamburguesa en la tienda. Pablo va a ir al restaurante a comer una hamburguesa y beber un refresco de limón. Después Pablo va a jugar un partido de fútbol con sus amigos.
    15. 15. Realidades * Real approach to language: vocabulary, grammar, culture, cross-curricular connections, learning strategies * Three types of video in one video program: language videos, grammar videos, mystery video Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next – teach, connect, and motivate with Realidades videos! * GramActiva grammar: hands-on activities that enable students to practice the grammar before moving into the communication * Sequenced activities: carefully sequenced activities progress from controlled to open-ended * Step-by-step scaffolding and support: clearly laid out steps for students to follow enable all students to be successful * Exploracion de lenguaje: focused study of how language works * La culture en vivo: real-life culture makes cultural products and practice come alive for students * Perspectivas del mundo hispano: authentic cultural perspectives get students to think about and compare cultures * Performance-based tasks: culminating speaking or writing tasks per chapter supported by the “speaking process” or “writing process” and rubrics * Review and test preparation: end-of-chapter summary pages of vocabulary and grammar plus preview of the chapter test
    16. 16. First Latin First Latin is a text series that is a good preparatory for the Ecce Romani Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next series. It is a text that allows for oral communication in Latin. Culturally and historically, the study of daily life in the time of Augustus and the various family life styles are ever present. Students are exposed to different myths, Roman religion, mythological creatures, Roman poets, and Roman history through readings and Latin sentences focussing on very basic Latin grammar structure. We also use Latin is Fun, a text that focusses more on Latin as a language. This text also incorporates culture, but using Latin as a tool. It is a more advanced grammar text than First Latin. The two texts complement one another in content both grammatically and culturally/historically. Both texts allow for a communicative and reading approach which adds zest to the program.
    17. 17. Ecce Romani Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Ecce Romani, the innovative, reading-based, Latin- language course originally developed by The Scottish Classics Group and widely adopted in American schools, meets contemporary classroom needs. Ecce Romani brings students to the point where they can read the Latin of classical authors with confidence. It also enhances general language learning techniques, including facility with English. Finally, it develops awareness of the culture of the Romans, its historical significance, and its contemporary relevance.
    18. 18. Role-Play Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    19. 19. Role-Play Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    20. 20. Role-Play Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    21. 21. R Games P O O M N A G E A Jeopardy HangMan Simón Dice Around the World Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    22. 22. Reading & Storytelling Readers, TPR Chapter Books, Spanish 3H: Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next 6th Grade Spanish: Muerte en el barrio Nosotros somos Dios Readings, Latin III Honors: Caesar's De Bello Gallico, Augustus' Res Gestae, brief selections from Cicero, and poems by Catullus, Horace, and Virgil.
    23. 23. Hands-On Activities Making Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next sombreros in the Lower School Making Aztec and Greco-Roman-style pottery in the Middle School Lower School students preparing Huichol Yarn Paintings
    24. 24. Presentations ¿Eres tú mi mamá? by the Lower School Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    25. 25. Presentations ¿Eres tú mi mamá? by the Lower School Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    26. 26. Latin Name Project Projects Spanish-Speaking Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Countries Project Spanish Painters Project click on the text to see an example of the project Latin Villa Project Aztec Calendar
    27. 27. Culture Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Mayan weavers present to students during Language Week, 2009
    28. 28. TPR To teach numbers in Spanish we can use TPR For numbers one to 29 we signal with our fingers the quantity being expressed. One to ten is easy, then for the teens you signal 10 fingers and then the corresponding number. For the 20s, signal two 10s, make the + sign with two fingers while saying “y” and then signal the corresponding number. 1. uno 6. seis 2. dos 7. siete 3. tres 8. ocho 4. cuatro 9. nueve Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next 5. cinco 10. diez 11. once --> 14. catorce 15. quince ( Keen- say at times it is difficult for kids to learn number fifteen, if this happens when you get to 15 make a round motion over your head as if you were wearing a crown to simbolize the first sound ( keen) as if you were a king and then put your hands on the sides of your mouth as if yelling for the second sillable ( say) 16. dieciséis --> 29. veintinueve 30. treinta ( make a circular motion with your hand on the side as if it were a train) 31. treinta y uno 32. treinta y dos 33. treinta y tres 40. cuarenta ( open and close your hand in a cuacking motion) 41. cuarenta y uno 42. cuarenta y dos 50. cincuenta ( swirl your finger up and down as if the water is going down the sink) 60. sesenta ( hands to the sides of your mouth to for SAY and stand up and sit back down for SENTA) 70. setenta ( hands to the sides of your mouth to for SAY and make a triangle with your fingers for TENTa) 80. ochenta ( One of your fingers makes a circular motion in front of your lips for te round “O”) 90. noventa ( Make a NO sign with your finger and then move your hand in a fanning motion for “NO VENT”) 100. cien ( Bring your finger to your eye for an aproximate pronunciation SEEN) 200. doscientos ( signal number two with your fingers, bring your finger to your eye aand then make a thowing motion DOS-SEEN_AND_ TOSS) 300. trescientos ( signal number three with your fingers, bring your finger to your eye aand then make a thowing motion TRES-SEEN_AND_ TOSS) 400. cuatrocientos ( signal number four with your fingers, bring your finger to your eye aand then make a thowing motion CUATRO-SEEN_AND_ TOSS) 500. quinientos ( make as if you were opening a door, then touch your knee and then make a thowing motion KEY-KNEE_AND-TOSS) 600. seiscientos ( signal number 6 with your fingers, bring your finger to your eye aand then make a thowing motion SEIS-SEEN_AND_ TOSS 700. setecientos ( signal number 7 with your fingers, bring your finger to your eye aand then make a thowing motion SEVEN-SEEN_AND_ TOSS 800. ochocientos ( signal number 8 with your fingers, bring your finger to your eye aand then make a thowing motion EIGHT-SEEN_AND_ TOSS 900. novecientos ( signal number 9 with your fingers, bring your finger to your eye aand then make a thowing motion NINE-SEEN_AND_ TOSS 1.000. mil ( bring your hands to your mouth as if you were eating MEAL)
    29. 29. Songs With a lesson on the verb “gustar:” With a lesson on the word of the month: Me Gusta by Elvis Crespo Amigo by Marc Anthony Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Album: Amar sin mentiras Tú eres mi hermano del alma, realmente el amigo Que en todo camino y jornada está siempre conmigo As you listen to the Aunque eres un hombre aun tienes alma de niño Aquel que me da su amistad su respeto y carino song, these are words to listen to: (Mark down Recuerdo que juntos pasamos muy duros momentos Y tú no cambiaste por fuertes que fueran los vientos each time you hear a Es tu corazón una casa de puertas abiertas Tú eres realmente el más cierto en horas inciertas... word/phrase!) Actividad 1. me gusta Escucha la canción. Busca y subrraya todos los diferentes tiempos 2. contigo verbales que hemos estudiado en estos momentos. Elije dos o tres palabras que no conoces y busca 3. casa su significado. ¿Cuál es el mensaje de la canción? ¿Cómo se 4. canciones relaciona con tu vida? Describe en tres frases por qué te gusta o no te gusta la canción?
    30. 30. Songs With a lesson on the verb “gustar:” With a lesson on the word of the month: Me Gusta by Elvis Crespo Amigo by Marc Anthony Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Album: Amar sin mentiras Tú eres mi hermano del alma, realmente el amigo Que en todo camino y jornada está siempre conmigo As you listen to the Aunque eres un hombre aun tienes alma de niño Aquel que me da su amistad su respeto y carino song, these are words to listen to: (Mark down Recuerdo que juntos pasamos muy duros momentos Y tú no cambiaste por fuertes que fueran los vientos each time you hear a Es tu corazón una casa de puertas abiertas Tú eres realmente el más cierto en horas inciertas... word/phrase!) Actividad 1. me gusta Escucha la canción. Busca y subrraya todos los diferentes tiempos 2. contigo verbales que hemos estudiado en estos momentos. Elije dos o tres palabras que no conoces y busca 3. casa su significado. ¿Cuál es el mensaje de la canción? ¿Cómo se 4. canciones relaciona con tu vida? Describe en tres frases por qué te gusta o no te gusta la canción?
    31. 31. Video Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next For students: By students: Abecedario Refranes by Mrs. Garcia by the 5th graders
    32. 32. Video Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next For students: By students: Abecedario Refranes by Mrs. Garcia by the 5th graders
    33. 33. Video Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next For students: By students: Abecedario Refranes by Mrs. Garcia by the 5th graders
    34. 34. Technology Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next SmartBoards VoiceThread WebCams/Skype iMovie Keynote/PowerPoint Podcasts iTunes/GarageBand
    35. 35. Technology Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next SmartBoards VoiceThread WebCams/Skype iMovie Keynote/PowerPoint Podcasts iTunes/GarageBand
    36. 36. Pen-Pals Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Letters between 5th-6th grade & Letters between 5th-4th grade & Letters with a school in Barcelona
    37. 37. The “What Else” Language Week Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next National Foreign Language Week was inaugurated in the Spring of 1957 by Alpha Mu Gamma. Sister Eloise Therese, the National President of Alpha Mu Gamma from 1956 to 1960 in Los Angeles City College. The first celebration was set for the week of February 17 to 23, 1957. In recent years it has become the practice to have NFLW during the first weeks of March. 6th Grade Spanish class with Pedro On December 12, 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent a Ángel, the Vice Consul of El Salvador telegram endorsing the celebration, and each succeeding president has added his support. Trip to Spain Taking place annually in the second week of March, Fessenden Ongoing Language Week is designed to celebrate the diversity of languages used in U.S.A and throughout the world. Although it Excursions and focuses on two languages taught in the Fessenden schools: Latin and Spanish, Language Week celebrates the teaching, learning Guests and use of ALL languages. Languages Week gives the Fessenden school and it’s community the opportunity to recognize and value the languages students speak at home or are learning at school (or elsewhere). It provides an opportunity to develop students’ awareness of the languages around them as well, to high- light the benefits of learning additional languages and to showcase the achievements of those already learning languages – within the school and the community. Through a series of contest, presentations by our community members and Fessenden Friends and guest speakers from consulates, cultral enrichment programs, artist and performers, Fessenden students are given an array of experiences that foster cultural awareness and better understanding of the world.
    38. 38. The “What Next” Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Language in Trip to Rome Motion Spanish 4 Mandarin
    39. 39. Language in Motion We think of it as an innovative, cooperative, outreach program using study-abroad returnees, international students, and upper-level language students of the different Unversities in Boston to aid Fessenden’s K-9 teachers by creating and presenting language and cultural activities, and/or “expert lessons” in their classrooms. There would be three basic components: Sharing the world with K-9 students International students, upper-level language students, and study-abroad returnees regularly present in upper school, middle school, and lower school classrooms to enrich language and cultural learning and to share their understanding of the country and culture. The teacher and presenter agree early in the semester on the level and amount of language to be used. In language classes and classes ranging from Social Studies and English to Biology, Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Art, Music, and Physical Education, College students will be able to present their expertise on their language and culture or in the field they are studying as “experts” giving students a new, young and different prespective of the subject being studied. Providing professional development opportunities for teachers Being in close contact with the Universities in our community would open vias for our teacher’s professional development by making it available for teacher to attend to Visiting Schoolar Workshops. Why should College students participate in this program? In addition to gaining valuable experience that will help in the classroom, in the workplace, and in life, some of the benefits: * Improved communication skills * Opportunities for additional language practice * A new look at your own and another culture * Chances to meet and work with new people * An appreciative audience for their experiences * Respect for them and the language and culture they present * Stimulating dialogue with teachers, students, and other presenters * A better sense of the American educational system and American school students * Fun and rewarding experiences * A chance to learn more about oneself * Positive feedback * Community Service credit that would add to teir studies. What will it offer to our teachers? Language in Motion will offer teachers several opportunities for enriching their students’ learning experiences and for professional development. We would offer a semi-annually changing group of college student presenters who are diverse, interesting, and passionate. They should have strong second-language knowledge and international experience, either having returned from study abroad or having come on a study-abroad trip from their home country. They will represent cultures from all over the world. Teachers wuld choose the presenters they would like to have in their classes and work with to coordinate their appearance and scheduling. . Each semester at a Teacher-Presenter workshop, participating teachers would have a chance to see short sample presentations, meet interested students that woud like to participate at that time, and talk with them both about their expectations of presentation content and method and about their students. The College students would then prepare class-length presentations on the chosen topics.
    40. 40. Mandarin Chinese Why Learn Chinese? There are many reasons! First, Chinese is the language of Nearly 1/4 of the World's Population. Speakers of Chinese not only live in China, Taiwan, and Singapore, but also spread throughout Southeast Asia, North America, and Europe, where large Chinese communities congregate. Chinese people today have been playing increasingly important roles worldwide. Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next Second, learning Chinese is an extraordinary and agreeable experience through which you can immerse yourself in a different culture. Unlike most languages, Chinese has a unique ideographic writing system, which provides visual comprehensibility. The grammatical structure of Chinese is not only logical, but also pragmatic, related to the particular way of Chinese thinking. Knowledge of the written language opens up the culture of one of the world's oldest civilizations. Third, traditional Chinese culture, from Confucianism and Chan Buddhism to martial arts and Chinese cuisine, has an enormous influence on East and Southeast Asian nations. Chinese culture has also greatly inspired the western world through Marco Polo, G. W. Leibniz, Max Weber, Franz Kafka, Andre Malraux, Bertolt Brecht, Ezra Pound, and Luis Borges, among others. Last, but not least, the People's Republic of China currently boasts the fastest growing economy in the world and is widely regarded as the potentially biggest global market in the twenty-first century. Proficient speakers of Mandarin Chinese will find jobs in various fields such as business, government, international relations, information technology, tourism, education, translation and much, much more. Of all foreign languages at American universities and colleges, Chinese shows the highest proportional increase in enrollment. Los Angeles Chinese Learning Center, on the other hand, provides Chinese class at flexible schedule for working adults at reasonable rates. Chinese language skills are increasingly in demand and schools nationwide are opting to update their Language Programs with the opportunity for students to study Mandarin language. We, as a language department believes that this would be great step to adopt. We would not only be giving broader opportunities to current language learners but would offer another possibility for our Mexican students whose only option now is Latin and to the Korean population of students who would greatly be interested in joining a program such as this for Chinese is a need for trade and business. The Language Department proposal is to start offering Chinese to International students and those students who have completed 3 years of another language study in a regular course or at least 2 years completed of another language in the honors track. This, while enriching our Language Program would not affect in great manner to our current language courses.
    41. 41. In conclusion, we aim for a love of learning and of learning language. We enjoy teaching your children because they are... Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next honest: “Mrs. Garcia, are you married?” “Yes.” “Is your husband also Spanish?” “Yes.” “So you speak Spanish all day long Mrs. Garcia?” “Yes.” “Oh that must be exhausting!” compassionate: Teacher decides that from now on everything in the class is going to be in Spanish. She tells the students that something really weird happened, and she bumped her head, and now, every time she enters the class, she only knows how to speak Spanish... The next day, a very worried mother comes into the class and wants to know how the accident happened and if the teacher is okay because her son was very concerned. respectful: In discussing characters in the textbook, one student stood up for one of them by saying: “We’re all different. He’s just overweight.” And because they are creative...
    42. 42. Thank you. Home * Who * Why * What * Which Way * What Else * What Next
    43. 43. “A gentleman need not know Latin, but he should have at least forgotten it.” -Brander Matthews
    44. 44. Fessenden Latin Program Grades 6 -9 Text In Context
    45. 45. Teaching the Text in Context: A Three- Fold Approach Study Skills Classical Civilization the Latin Language
    46. 46. Various Lenses Roman Religion The Roman Army Ancient History The Issue of Empire Daily Life in Ancient Rome
    47. 47. Grade 6 - Villa Project
    48. 48. I.Roman Villa: A Way To Teach Study Skills
    49. 49. ROMAN VILLA PROJECT OBJECTIVES 1. To work together to create a beautiful villa. 2. To create a model of a villa that one might see in Ancient Rome. 3. To learn about the daily life of a Roman person on a villa. 4. To use creativity with the model, yet to maintain authenticity. 5. To utilize study skills, i.e. long term planning methods to achieve your goal. DIRECTION 1. Research villas (with information from me, books, slide show, and the internet) and gather your information. 2. Gather your group together. 3. Brainstorm, as a group, how you want your villa to look like. 4. Decide roles for each person. BE FAIR with assignments. a. Who will do the final floor plan? b. What rooms will be done by which person? c. How can you help each other to make a fantastic model? 5. Draw a neat and orderly floor plan of your model. a. The floor plan must be drawn with a sharp pencil/colored pencils on plain paper or drawn on the computer. b. Label each part of your villa with the Latin name. (It can be in the form of a key or a labeled diagram.) The due date for the floor plan is _______________ 6. Create your model of the rooms according to your groupʼs assignments. You may use paper, cardboard, shoe boxes, Legos, sugar cubes, wood, pasta, etc. If you need the help of Ms. Brophy, or the art room, YOU MUST ASK HER WAY AHEAD OF TIME. The due date for the model is _________________ Your model will then be presented to your classmates and put on display in the library hallway.
    50. 50. Villa Grading Rubric Criteria: Floor plan Authenticity Creativity Knowledge Presentation Organization Finished Product Due Dates Met Effort and Fairness with all participants The highest mark for each box is 4 points. Give the score and comment on the reasoning. 4 = best 3 = good 2 = just ok, needed some work 1 = unsatisfactory What did you learn about the project itself, the process and you as a Latin student?
    51. 51. Collaboration Library Fundamentals of Research Research Organizer, Project Specific Art Department Learning How to Utilize Cross-Curricular resources in the School
    52. 52. II. Roman Villa: A Way to Teach Classical Civilizations
    53. 53. Reconstructing the Past Through Archaeology
    54. 54. How Archaeologists Interpret Non-Literary Evidence
    55. 55. Example: House of The Silver Wedding In Pompeii
    56. 56. Cubiculum
    57. 57. Peristylium
    58. 58. Tablinum
    59. 59. III. Roman Villa: A Way to Teach the Latin Language
    60. 60. Latin Used in Daily Life
    61. 61. Graffiti Campaign Advertisement
    62. 62. Examining the Language culina, -ae, f. - kitchen hortus, -i, m. - garden Atrium, -i, n. - Main Room
    63. 63. Villa Project Afterlife: Grade 7
    64. 64. Ecce Romani, Book I Textbook presents a continuous narrative of a Second-Century, Upper Class Roman Family Book i finds the family in their summer villa in the south of Italy
    65. 65. Baiae
    66. 66. Pliny, Letters ii.17 Pliny: Roman Author 61 A.D. - 112 A.D. Letters provide a Unique Look into Everyday life in the first century
    67. 67. Villa usibus capax, non sumptuosa tutela. 4 Cuius in prima parte atrium frugi, nec tamen sordidum; deinde porticus in D litterae similitudinem circumactae, quibus parvola sed festiva area includitur. Egregium hac adversus tempestates receptaculum; nam specularibus ac multo magis imminentibus rectis muniuntur. 5 Est contra medias cavaedium hilare, mox triclinium satis pulchrum, quod in litus excurrit ac si quando Africo mare impulsum est, fractis iam et novissimis fluctibus leviter alluitur. Undique valvas aut fenestras non minores valvis habet atque ita a lateribus a fronte quasi tria maria prospectat; a tergo cavaedium porticum aream porticum rursus, mox atrium silvas et longinquos respicit montes. 6 Huius a laeva retractius paulo cubiculum est amplum, deinde aliud minus quod altera fenestra admittit orientem, occidentem altera retinet; hac et subiacens mare longius quidem sed securius intuetur. 7 Huius cubiculi et triclinii illius obiectu includitur angulus, qui purissimum solem continet et accendit.
    68. 68. Reconstruction of Pliny’s Villa:
    69. 69. Roman Fresco Project
    70. 70. Villa Project Afterlife Grade 8
    71. 71. Ecce Romani, Book II Movement in the Narrative from the Countryside to the City Transition from An Agrarian Project to Urban Rome
    72. 72. Ability TO Contrast Villa Life Against Urban Poverty
    73. 73. Horace, Satires ii.6 Hoc erat in votis: modus agri non ita magnus, hortus ubi et tecto vicinus iugis aquae fons et paulum silvae super his foret. auctius atque di melius fecere. bene est. nil amplius oro, Maia nate, nisi ut propria haec mihi munera faxis. 5 si neque maiorem feci ratione mala rem nec sum facturus vitio culpave minorem, si veneror stultus nihil horum 'o si angulus ille proximus accedat, qui nunc denormat agellum!' 'o si urnam argenti fors quae mihi monstret, ut illi, 10 thesauro invento qui mercennarius agrum illum ipsum mercatus aravit, dives amico Hercule!', si quod adest gratum iuvat, hac prece te oro: pingue pecus domino facias et cetera praeter ingenium, utque soles, custos mihi maximus adsis. 15 ergo ubi me in montes et in arcem ex urbe removi, quid prius inlustrem saturis musaque pedestri? nec mala me ambitio perdit nec plumbeus auster autumnusque gravis, Libitinae quaestus acerbae. Matutine pater, seu Iane libentius audis, 20 unde homines operum primos vitaeque labores instituunt—sic dis placitum—, tu carminis esto principium. Romae sponsorem me rapis: 'eia, ne prior officio quisquam respondeat, urge.' sive aquilo radit terras seu bruma nivalem 25 interiore diem gyro trahit, ire necesse est. postmodo quod mi obsit clare certumque locuto luctandum in turba et facienda iniuria tardis. 'quid tibi vis, insane?' et 'quam rem agis?' inprobus urget iratis precibus, 'tu pulses omne quod obstat, 30 ad Maecenatem memori si mente recurras.'
    74. 74. Villa Project Afterlife Grade 9
    75. 75. Villa As Bucolic Ideal Golden Age Latin Poetry - The Country Villa as Prelapsarian Retreat from the Corrupt City
    76. 76. Horace, Odes 3.13 Velox amoenum saepe Lucretilem mutat Lycaeo Faunus et igneam In swift passage Faunus often changes defendit aestatem capellis Lycaeus for fair Lucretilis, and wards off usque meis pluviosque ventos. from my goats the fiery heat and rainy winds during all his stay. impune tutum per nemus arbutos quaerunt latentes et thyma deviae Harmlessly through safe thickets do the roaming olentis uxores mariti, consorts of the rank he-goat hunt the hiding arbutus nec viridis metuunt colubras and thyme. Nor do the kids have fear of poisonous snakes or of the wolf, the war god's favourite, nec Martialis haediliae lupos, utcumque dulci, Tyndari, fistula when once, O Tyndaris, sloping Ustica's valles et Vsticae cubantis vales and smooth-worn rocks have echoed levia personuere saxa. with the sweet pipe. di me tuentur, dis pietas mea et Musa cordi est. Hic tibi copia The gods are my protection; to the gods both manabit ad plenum benigno my devotion and ruris honorum opulenta cornu. my muse are dear. hic in reducta valle Caniculae vitabis aestus, et fide Teia In this spot shall rich abundance of the glories of the field flow dices laborantis in uno to the full for thee from bounteous horn. Here in retired valley Penelopen vitreamque Circen; shalt thou escape the dog-star's heat, and sing on Teian lyre Penelope and Circe of the glassy sea, enamoured of the self-same hero. hic innocentis pocula Lesbii duces sub umbra, nec Semeleius Here shalt thou quaff bowls of harmless cum Marte confundet Thyoneus Mellow wine beneath the shade, nor shall Thyoneus, proelia, nec metues protervum child of Semele, engage in broils with Mars. Nor shalt thou, watched with jealous eye, fear the suspecta Cyrum, ne male dispari incontinentes iniciat manus wanton Cyrus, lest he lay rude hands on et scindat haerentem coronam thee, a partner ill-suited to his cruel ways, or crinibus inmeritamque vestem. lest he rend the garland clinging to thy locks, or thy unoffending robe.
    77. 77. Villa as Socio-Political Entity As boys deepen their understanding of Roman history, they learn that these villas were only made possible when the wealthy pushed poorer farmers off their land and into the crowded cities The “villa,” then becomes a symbol, the abuse of power by the wealthy, the dislocation of the poor, the subsequent political unrest generated by these Country Pleasure Palaces
    78. 78. Study of Julius Caesar in 9th Grade Studying Caesar and reading his commentaries on the Civil War, the boys are able to see how the massive disparities between the Upper and Lower classes resulted in turbulent, political urest Boys are also able to read, in Caesar’s own words, how he manipulated the political situation to become dictator for life, thus ending the Republic
    79. 79. Click “here” to return to the Language department presentation
    80. 80. El Cuento del Pollito de Merce Garcia
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    88. 88. Click “here” to return to the Language Department presentation

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