6 art of co leading lesson plan and ub-d

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6 art of co leading lesson plan and ub-d

  1. 1. The Art of Co-Leading!Lesson 6 Included in GLTI Combined Training ResourcesLength: 75 minutes • List of Positive Co-leading Characteristics • Group Leader Check-Ins and Feedback • Pre-Program Planning with your Co-Leader/sMaterials Prepare before Session• Chart paper • “Going with the Yes” scenario cards (2 sets)• Markers • Four Stakeholders poster • Place tape on the floor in the middle of the room for the Spectrum activityEstablished Outcomes• GLs know the components and criteria of an effective co-leader relationship: ! They recognize one’s own and others’ leadership styles. ! They effectively collaborate with others who have different leadership styles.• GLs apply the necessary tools and criteria for creating and maintaining a positive co-leader relationship even when time is short and circumstances are stressful: ! Using the Pre-departure Checklist. ! “Going with the Yes” and “Yes, and…” ! Giving and receiving positive and constructive feedback ! Using headquarters as a resource. ! Using the Three Principles of Group Leading.Flow!" Stakeholders Impacted: Framing/Value#" Real Expectations and Components of a Good Co-leader Relationship$" Interjections%" Co-Leader Conversation&" ConclusionSpecial Notes: This session is written specifically for programs that are led by a co-leading pair or trio in which all leaders share allresponsibilities and are equals on the management spectrum. If your program is led by large teams with specific internal hierarchies androle differences, much of the content is still applicable, though you may need to make some adjustments.This material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  2. 2. The Art of Co-Leading!Lesson/Activity Plan Time/Materials Content Stake- 1. Say: “In this session we will talk about co-leading relationships.” holders Impacted: 2. Ask the group for at least three examples of how your co-leading relationship impacts the four stakeholders listed below. Push the group to be specific in their examples (e.g., “What does that look like?”). Framing/ Value a. Your participant group b. Your co-leader 5 min. c. Yourself (GL) Four d. Partner NGOsStakeholders (Note: If mostly positive or mostly negative impacts come up, point out that the reverse can happen when the poster relationship is not good/good.) $" Include the following big picture/organizational impacts if not mentioned: a. GLs and participants level of connectedness to the organization. b. The organization’s reputation with participants and their families. c. Ultimately, our partner NGOs gain or suffer based on the support lost or won for the organization by the GLs. Real !" Say: “A positive, effective, professional relationship has many components, but at first we might not all think ofExpectations this in the same way. We want you to thoughtfully take time with each of your co-leaders to understand your and styles, strengths and needs as well as our expectations for what everyone needs to bring to the table. Individually,Components we each need to be able to work with styles similar to and different from our own and present a unified front to of a Good participants.” Co-leader #" Say: “We’re now going to think about how to prepare to work together as a co-leader team.” This requires theRelationship following three elements: 17 min. a. Preparation; b. Going with the other’s flow; List of c. Thoughtful feedback. Spectrum categories, 3. Instruct GLs to look at the “List of Positive Co-leading Characteristics” (Note: this is untitled in the manual). Give Manuals participants time to review. 4. Ask: “Are there any words you would like to add? Remove?” Also say: “Note that best friend is not on the list.This material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  3. 3. The Art of Co-Leading! What is realistic and necessary in a co-leading relationship?” (Note: Offer this list as a discussion tool to use with your co-leader/s. Which categories would you prioritize in this work? Why? Where do you feel strong? Where do you want support? What kind of support? What are patterns you want to challenge?) 5. Have everyone stand up and move to one side of the room. 6. Explain that you will announce two statements referring to different work styles or preferences on a spectrum. 7. Instruct GLs to physically move themselves to a space on the spectrum (between the two sides of the room) that represents how they see themselves. (Note: Be clear in your instructions which side refers to which style/preference.) Indicate to GLs that though they may not always fall squarely into one category, they should choose a spot that reflects how they default in general. The objective of this activity is to allow GLs to reflect and begin a conversation among co-leaders. Indicate that if a GL feels that he/she is in the middle of the spectrum, he/she should still choose one side of the spectrum to show which side they find themselves in more often, even if only slightly or by circumstance. 8. Finally, inform GLs the activity will be done silently, but there will be time to process afterwards. 9. Read the following statements and ask GLs to move on the spectrum: a. I’m a night person vs. morning person. (spectrum as stated) b. It’s important to me that we spend a lot of time debriefing curriculum sessions after each lesson. (yes/no) c. I am an improviser, or, I am a planner. (spectrum as stated) d. I enjoy being in front of a group. (yes/no) e. I enjoy logistics. (yes/no) f. I need alone time every day. (yes/no) g. I tend to avoid dealing with interpersonal conflict directly. (yes/no) h. I very comfortable being an authority figure and addressing behavior issues. (yes/no) i. I am a private person, or, I am very open with strangers and group members. (yes/no) j. I feel strong in my skills to teach Jewish text. (yes/no) k. I am an introvert, or, I am an extrovert. (spectrum as stated) l. I tend to respond quickly, or, I tend to take a moment to process before I talk. (yes/no) 10. Each time after GLs move to their self-selected spot, ask them to make eye contact with all of their assigned co- leaders. 11. Debrief: Like the “List of Positive Co-leading Characteristics,” the responses to the questions on this spectrum are a starting point for you to check in with your coleader. How do you balance each other? How do you reinforceThis material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  4. 4. The Art of Co-Leading! each other’s habits? How might opposite styles support or confuse your group members?” 12. Ask: “What can you plan in advance armed with this knowledge?” 13. Have GLs take a minute or two to read the pre-program checklist in the manual silently to themselves. Say: “This pre-program checklist is designed to guide your conversation the first time you work together. It is essential.” (Note: Offer time to answer questions for clarity.) Interjections 1. Have participants sit in a close circle. 2. Say: “We are going to focus on several skills that are crucial to building and maintaining a positive co-leader 18 min. relationship: a. “Going with the Yes.” Manual, Going with b. Giving and receiving positive and constructive feedback.the Yes index c. “Yes, and…” cards 3. Say: “Everyone here was hired because we have confidence in your ability to lead, teach, collaborate, follow protocol and represent our organization. We tell you this not just to affirm your own confidence, but also to give you confidence in your co-leader. Even if your styles are very different, your co-leader is capable and qualified. It’s important to learn to appreciate the skills, knowledge and style that your co-leader brings to your team.” 4. Say: “This activity is meant to illustrate how to be a supportive co-leader in front of the group even when you and your co-leader disagree.” a. Ask the GLs so stand in a circle. Ask for phrases that suggest teamwork or partnership vs. contradiction or power conflict. Suggested language can include “yes, and” or “I wonder if” instead of “yes, but” or “on the other hand.” The point is to convey a tone of partnership to your co-leader and observers and to self- check your own motivations. b. Present a hat to the circle containing index cards with topics written on them. The first person in the circle with the hat will pull out one of the cards and make a statement (as if speaking to a participant group) on that topic. Passing the hat to the person on their right, that person must add a related but differing thought (in the role of a co-leader addressing their co-GL or group) using “Going with the yes,” tool. c. Passing the hat on to the right, the next person reflects on the response given, adding more or offering an alternative. This person then also pulls a card from the hat and reads the next card. d. Continue around the circle until everyone has read or responded.This material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  5. 5. The Art of Co-Leading! Check-ins 1. Ask GLs to review “Group Leader Check-Ins and Feedback” in the manual. and Feedback a. Ask new leaders to read and write down questions for clarity. b. Ask returning leaders to read and circle things they think are most often not done in the field, and that if 22 min. done, would improve the program and the co-leader relationship. i. Answer questions for clarity. Manual ii. Ask returning leaders to share their lists. Say: “Let’s all work hard to be aware and do these things.” 2. Say: “What is the purpose of feedback? In part, the practice keeps us present with our intentions and behavior and how we are being perceived. Ultimately, it is about growing yourself to be the best leader you can be for the group, for yourself, for your co-leader and for the co-leading team. a. Positive feedback is about identifying what you do well and building on those skills. b. Constructive feedback is about identifying your areas for growth, which will allow you to formulate a plan to build those skills. c. Self-positive feedback is very important. It helps you to be conscious about what you’re doing well, not just what you wish you were doing well. Recognize your strengths and think of them during feedback. d. Self-constructive feedback is also very important. It helps you to identify and be conscious of your own growth areas and focus on building concrete useful professional skills. Furthermore, others will feel better about giving you constructive feedback when you’re giving it to yourself. e. Providing constructive feedback to your co-leader can be difficult. Remember that providing constructive feedback is not about being in conflict, it is not about authority, it is not a power play, and it is not disrespectful. It is a gift. It is your commitment to help them become the best leader they can be, which is part of your responsibility to the group and to the program. Done well, it is a high form of respect and shows your investment in your co-leader and the program. f. Feedback is easier to give and receive if it is consistently given as opposed to given only when something really needs to change. g. The better you and your co-leader are at your jobs, the better you will lead. Feedback is the built-in mechanism for insuring that co-leaders can perform at their absolute best. It is a chance to take responsibility for yourself and each other. h. Feedback is almost always more effective when the recipient asks for it. Consider building in a practice of having co-leaders ritualize the request for feedback on a daily basis as part of their check-ins. i. There are times in the course of a program when GLs want positive feedback (for a bit of a pick-me-up) and other times when GLs want constructive feedback (because they are frustrated by a particular teaching session and want to concretize their learning about what went wrong). Note that different GLs may need different kinds of feedback at different times, and that their co-leaders should honor thoseThis material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  6. 6. The Art of Co-Leading! needs as much as possible. 3. Say: “We are going to practice giving and receiving feedback.” To do this: a. Pair up with someone who is not your co-leader. b. Give each other feedback about how you’ve been doing in the role of leader-participant as described on the first day. c. Before beginning to speak, take a minute to think and jot down notes. d. Partner A should take two minutes to provide positive and constructive self-feedback. Partner B should then take two minutes to share positive and constructive feedback with partner A. Reverse roles. e. Whether you agree or disagree, don’t respond to the feedback given to you. (However, you should feel free to ask clarifying questions if you don’t understand the feedback.) Thank your partner for sharing his/her feedback with you. f. After all feedback has been shared, spend a few minutes discussing with your partner how this process felt. Co-Leader 1. Tell GLs to find and sit with their co-leaders.Conversation 2. Partners should discuss what they observed in the “spectrum” activity. 10 min. 3. Instruct GLs to share a story with their co-leader about a difficult working partnership from the past. Ask teams to reflect on: “How did you work to improve this relationship? What did you learn from this experience about how to improve these relationships in the future?” Manuals 4. If there is time, begin to review “Pre-Program Planning with your Co-Leader/s” and “Group Leader Check-ins and Feedback” in the manual. Conclusion 1. Ask for one quick suggestion about how these practices fulfill each of the Three Principles (e.g., “One primary way that you can use your co-leading relationship to embody ‘everything I say and do is part of the curriculum’ is 3 min. to model a respectful, supportive and effective adult relationship. This is an incredible lesson for participants to learn by watching you.”)This material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  7. 7. UbD, Lesson 6: The Art of Co-leading Stage 1 – Desired Results Established Outcomes• Leaders know the components and criteria of an effective co-leader relationship: ! They recognize their own and others’ leadership styles. ! They effectively collaborate with others who have different leadership styles.• Leaders apply the necessary tools and criteria for creating and maintaining a positive co-leader relationship even when time is short and circumstances are stressful: ! Using the Pre-departure Checklist. ! “Going with the Yes” and “Yes, and…” ! Giving and receiving positive and constructive feedback. ! Using headquarters as a resource. ! Using the Three Principles of Group Leading. Concepts to be Covered During the Session Key Questions to Ask LearnersBig Ideas presented: 1. What is realistic and necessary in your1. Stakeholders and impacts of the co-leader partnership? relationship 2. Why is “best friend” not on the list of good2. Components of a good co-leader relationship relationship characteristics? 3. Returning co-leaders: What steps of feedback3. Variety of leadership styles are most often skipped in the field?4. Importance of feedback5. Realistic and necessary vs. ideal partnershipsSpecific ideas/concepts to learn/remember:1. How to have a feedback exchangePredictable misunderstandings:1. Constructive feedback is more important than positive feedback.2. Constructive feedback feels bad Stage 2 – Assessment How Will We Check for Understanding at GLTI Field Work/Performance Assessment MethodsDemonstrate: 1. GL Post-program report1. Giving and receiving feedback in pairs. 2. Program debrief with supervisorDiscuss: 3. Co-leader debrief1. How do you adapt “Going with the Yes” to your 4. Participant survey own, authentic style?Ask Direct Questions:1. Who are stakeholders?2. Where do you fall on the spectrums of leadership styles?3. How are you doing at being an active learner this week? Stage 3 – Lesson Plan Checklist• Materials and pre-session prep list. • Use 2-3 different modalities (not just• Each part of lesson has an assigned time limit. talk/listen/discuss; reflection/writing, small group presentations/poster making, theater games,• The presentation is significantly different from partners/smaller groups, art). past versions in order to maintain returning GL’s interest. • Check for understanding (e.g. ask direct questions, use group discussion to gauge, have learners• Taps into learners’ previous practice/demonstrate. knowledge/experience.• Provides new content/information.This material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership forJustice and BBYO Panim Institute with support from Repair the World.

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