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Lib guides on steroids

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Lib guides on steroids

This is the full presentation of "LibGuides on Steroids: Expanding the User Base of LibGuides to Support Library Instruction and Justify Workload" prepared for the LibTech 2011 Conference at Macalester College, St. Paul, MN, March 16-17, 2011.

This is the full presentation of "LibGuides on Steroids: Expanding the User Base of LibGuides to Support Library Instruction and Justify Workload" prepared for the LibTech 2011 Conference at Macalester College, St. Paul, MN, March 16-17, 2011.

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Lib guides on steroids

  1. 1. "LibGuides on Steroids":Expanding the User Base of LibGuides to Support Library Instruction and Justify Workload<br />Carol A. Leibiger, Ph.D., MSLIS<br />Associate Professor, Information Literacy Coordinator<br />University Libraries, The University of South Dakota<br />
  2. 2. A Short History of Subject Guides <br />Pathfinders to Subject Guides to LibGuides<br />
  3. 3. Pathfinder, c. 1970-1995<br />developed as part of the Model Library Project of Project Intrex, Massachusetts Institute of Technology<br />step-by-step orientation, reference, and instructional tool to information sources<br />intended to support the first 3-5 hours of research<br />uniform in arrangement and content<br />limited to a single 8.5 x 11 inch sheet<br />“The result is an efficient and productive library experience.”<br /> (Canfield, 1972)<br />
  4. 4. Pathfinders, c. 1970-1995<br />Pros (for users and librarians):<br />Pathfinders addressed two related problems <br />of reference work:<br />“the orientation problems of library <br />users”<br />“the repetitive instructional <br />demands placed on library <br />staff” (Cipolla, 1980)<br />
  5. 5. Pathfinders, c. 1970-1995<br />Cons:<br />Pathfinders originated two problems inherent in subject guides:<br />workload: the need to create <br />Pathfinders and keep them <br />up to date<br />marketing: the need to broaden <br />their use among patrons <br />(Canfield, 1972)<br />
  6. 6. Online Subject Guides, c. 1994-<br /><ul><li>developed from online subject guides or electronic Pathfinders enhanced with HTML links (Cox, 1997)</li></li></ul><li>Online Subject Guides, c. 1994-<br />Librarians have examined subject guides in the <br />light of…<br /><ul><li>usability
  7. 7. accessibility
  8. 8. marketing
  9. 9. information literacy
  10. 10. workload</li></ul>(Vileno, 2007)<br />topic selection<br />inclusion criteria<br />design guidelines<br />target audience<br />usage<br />user evaluations<br />
  11. 11. Online Subject Guides, c. 1994-<br />Librarians have approached the workload issues associated subject guide creation in various ways: <br />static HTML<br />database-driven subject guides<br />course management systems<br />Web 2.0 technologies<br />blogs<br />social bookmarking Web sites<br />wikis <br />(Corrado 2010)<br />
  12. 12. And then came LibGuides, 2007-<br />“subject guide in a box”: CMS available from Springshare (www.springshare.com)<br />maintained on Springshare’s web site<br />created by librarians!!!<br />extremely popular (over 2,000 institutional subscriptions)<br />many enthusiastic conference presentations<br /> (www.springshare.com/libguides/reviews.html)<br />
  13. 13. To summarize…<br />Subject guides have been in use in libraries since the 1970s.<br />They are intended to… <br />provide reference help and instruction to library users and<br />raise the level of reference questions and improve reference staff morale.<br />Web subject guides provide reference assistance, instruction, and 24/7 access to users regardless of location.<br />Major issues of subject guides are… <br />marketing (how to get users to access/use them) and<br />workload associated with their creation and maintenance.<br />LibGuides…<br />provide subject guides with Web 2.0 features that students will access and<br />provide a solution to one of the workload problems of subject guides.<br />
  14. 14. Why We love libguides<br />Let us count the ways!<br />
  15. 15. LibGuides, 2007-<br />Do<br /> you<br /> LibGuides?<br />
  16. 16. What librarians love about LibGuides: From the literature…<br />quick and easy to create (perfect for non-techie subject liaisons)<br />can be customized, personalized, branded<br />promote consistency of format and contents<br />allow repackaging of content for different audiences <br />can be embedded in a CMS<br />automatically check links; broken links reported to page creator<br />easily capture statistics<br />Web 2.0 applications allow dynamic communication and collaboration<br />
  17. 17. What librarians love about LibGuides: Uses beyond guides<br />library research/resource FAQ for distance learning students<br />research methods resource page<br />IL pages<br />instructional pages to replace live instruction???<br />training tool/reference site for staff and student workers<br />supporting library/institutional projects and events<br />tenure/promotion document repository<br />surveys<br />digital repository<br />conference presentations and virtual handouts!<br />
  18. 18. LibGuides aren’t perfect<br />Continuing Problems Associated With Subject Guides/ Pathfinders<br />
  19. 19. LibGuides aren’t perfect<br />Continuing problems associated with <br />subject guides:<br />Who are the intended users of subject guides?<br />How do we get them to use subject guides?<br />How do we know that users learn from subject guides?<br />How do we justify the workload of subject <br />guides, if we can’t answer these questions?<br />
  20. 20. Who are subject guides actually created for? Students? Researchers?<br />subject guides relieve reference librarians of repetitive questions (Cipolla, 1980) and thus raise staff morale (Jackson, 1984)<br />production of guides is considered part of the traditional role of subject librarians (Pinfield, 2001)<br />“important library publications” (Dunsmore, 2002)<br />
  21. 21. Who are subject guides actually created for? Students? Researchers?<br />used for staff training (Jackson & Pellack, 2004)<br />“proof of expertise in a subject area, …quantitative measure of performance during…reviews” (Reeb & Gibbons, 2004)<br />While we create subject guides for <br />users, we also create them for <br />ourselves.<br />
  22. 22. Marketing subject guides<br />The literature is unanimous: <br />Market them via instruction!<br />(Adebonojo, 2010; Brazzeal, 2006; Foster et al., 2010; Greene, 2008; Jackson, 2004; McMullin, 2010; Miner & Alexander, 2010; Reeb & Gibbons, 2004; Staley, 2007)<br />
  23. 23. Do we know that subject guides increase learning?<br />Guide availability doesn’t guarantee their use <br />(Hemming, 2005; Morris, 2010; Staley, 2007; <br />Vileno, 2007)<br />Librarians invest a great deal of time on <br />subject guides, but student use is low (Reeb & <br />Gibbons, 2004)<br />Guides reflect librarians’ mental models, not those of students or faculty (Reeb & Gibbons, 2004; Neilson, 2004)<br />If guides are associated with course faculty <br />rather than the library, will student use and <br />learning increase?<br />
  24. 24. A word about workload<br />The average subject guide/pathfinder takes an <br /> experienced librarian between 8 and 20 hours to <br /> produce (Kapoun, 1995; Wilbert, 1981).<br />The more electronic resources<br /> a subject guide contains, <br /> the more unstable its <br /> contents (the average life <br /> span of a URL = 44 days <br />[Kahle, 1997]).<br />
  25. 25. A word about workload<br />No research has been done on the time required to maintain a subject guide.<br />The literature is <br /> unanimous in <br /> pointing out the <br />effect of creating/<br /> maintaining guides <br /> on workload.<br />
  26. 26. Another workload issue<br />New issue associated with LibGuides<br />Ease of creation <br /> encourages production <br /> of LibGuides, but <br /> adds to workload<br /> because of necessary<br />maintenance. <br />
  27. 27. Coordinating IL instruction and scalability<br />Sharing Instruction in Large General-Education Courses<br />
  28. 28. IL Coordinator Issues<br />University of South Dakota<br />Instructional Team = IL Coordinator and Instructional Services Librarian<br />IL-mandated courses<br />Freshman Composition<br />Honors English<br />Introduction to Literature<br />Advanced Composition<br />Speech Communication<br />Fall 2010: 44 sections of Freshman English at main and satellite campuses<br />Gen-ed IL instruction shared with 9 other faculty librarians<br />
  29. 29. IL Coordinator Issues<br />LIS programs don’t train librarians to teach.<br />Subject liaisons don’t all have expertise in gen-ed<br /> subjects like literature.<br />Library colleagues have limited time for instructional planning/design.<br />Gen-ed one-shot library sessions must contain uniform content and high-quality instruction.<br />How to ensure uniformity and quality of instruction in large general-education courses?<br />
  30. 30. Solution: LibGuides!<br />LibGuides are currently used to support<br />student learning during and after library<br />instruction.<br />Let’s use them to scaffold <br />instruction by library faculty <br />before and during library <br />sessions.<br />
  31. 31. Libguides that support library instruction<br />Scaffolding Library Faculty IL Instruction and Student Learning<br />
  32. 32. Solution: LibGuides!<br />The Freshman English Research Guide is <br />used by the USD library faculty as an <br />instructional script to ensure uniformity and<br />quality of content in library sessions.<br />Freshman English Research Guide  <br />
  33. 33. Solution: LibGuides!<br />The ENGL 210: Introduction to Literature <br />Research Guide is used by the USD library <br />faculty as an instructional script to ensure <br />uniformity and quality of content in library sessions.<br />ENGL 210: Introduction to Literature<br />contains information on literary analysis to scaffold library faculty preparation and teaching<br />performs the traditional function of scaffolding student research and learning<br />
  34. 34.  LibGuides, Scalable Instruction, and the Teaching Faculty<br />Scaffolding Teaching Faculty to Expand Scalable IL Instruction<br />
  35. 35. LibGuidesand Scalable IL Instruction<br />LibGuide use in library instruction can lead <br />to more library instruction.<br />The goal of IL instruction is to become <br />increasingly embedded into higher <br />education curricula.<br /> * * * * * * * * *<br />What problems do we encounter as the <br />demand for IL instruction increases?<br />Do we become victims of our own success?<br />
  36. 36. LibGuidesand Scalable IL Instruction<br />Smith (1997) and Leibiger (2010) <br />suggest IL instruction will not become <br />engrained into higher education or be <br />taught authentically until… <br />it’s disassociated from the library<br />it becomes embedded in faculty disciplinary instruction<br />
  37. 37. LibGuidesand Scalable IL Instruction<br />To embed IL into the curriculum in a scalable<br />way, library faculty need to become IL <br />educational experts:<br />library faculty “train the trainer” in course design and IL pedagogy<br />the library becomes a teaching and learning venue for both faculty and students<br />Library faculty are both subject specialists <br />and IL teaching specialists.<br />
  38. 38. LibGuidesand Scalable IL Instruction<br />Why “hand over” IL instruction?<br />decreasinglibrary faculty and expanding requests for IL instruction<br />including the teaching faculty is a scalableway to increase IL instruction<br />more efficient to “train the trainer”<br />possible to reach more students with a limited library faculty<br />
  39. 39. LibGuidesand Scalable IL Instruction<br />Why “hand over” IL instruction?<br />allows faculty librarians to engage in higher-order, higher-visibility teaching<br />IL perceived as part of a course or discipline and not as an add-on or “hoop”<br />makes possible new, powerful, collaborative relationships with faculty, departments, and programs to enhance teaching and learning<br />
  40. 40. LibGuidesand Scalable IL Instruction<br />How to “train the trainer”<br />formal instruction via workshops, presentations at departmental meetings, etc.<br />informal marketing and instruction via conversations at social gatherings, over lunch, etc. <br />online teaching and support of IL instruction via a LibGuide! <br />LibGuides<br />
  41. 41. Voilà! A LibGuide on Steroids<br />The Finished Product: A Multiple-Use Scaffolding Tool to Support IL Instruction<br />
  42. 42. Voilà! A LibGuide on Steroids<br />Freshman English Information Literacy Instructors' Guide   <br />Provides the resources necessary for the Freshman English course assignments<br />Provides scaffolding for library faculty who teach in support of these assignments<br />Provides scaffolding for teaching faculty who wish to include IL instruction and activities in their disciplinary instruction<br />Freshman English Information Literacy Instructors' Guide<br />
  43. 43. Conclusion and discussion<br />Questions? Comments? Advice?<br />
  44. 44. Conclusion<br />The Freshman English Information Literacy Instructors' Guidehas been developed to support/scaffold… <br />library faculty colleagues’ teaching of research sessions<br />scalable IL instruction by teaching faculty<br />
  45. 45. Conclusion<br />A “LibGuide on Steroids” has the following additional benefits:<br />Identification of users: Once faculty users are identified, we can focus the contents on their instructional needs.<br />Marketing: Faculty use LibGuides to teach and thus ensure use by students.<br />Justification of workload: As the number of users increases, work to maintain LibGuides is justified.<br />
  46. 46. Questions and Discussion<br />Questions?<br />Help me out! Can you suggest additional content?<br />
  47. 47. Check out this slideshow <br />On slideshare:<br />http://www.slideshare.net/cleibige/libguides-on-steroids<br />As a LibGuide:<br />http://libguides.usd.edu/LibGuides_on_Steroids<br />
  48. 48. Contact the Author <br />Carol A. Leibiger, Ph.D., MSLIS<br />Associate Professor<br />Information Literacy Coordinator<br />University Libraries<br />University of South Dakota<br />Vermillion, SD 57069<br />C.Leibiger@usd.edu<br />605-677-6089<br />

Editor's Notes

  • Workload and use
  • Workload and use
  • Why should library faculty “hand over” IL instruction to the teaching faculty?IL skills belong to the tacit knowledge of disciplines and should be taught within the context of disciplines.Faculty are both disciplinary experts and the wielders of grades in their courses. Students view them as having expertise and power and will use them as models.disassociating IL from the library means IL will be perceived as part of a course or discipline and not as an add-on or “hoop.”
  • Why should library faculty “hand over” IL instruction to the teaching faculty?IL skills belong to the tacit knowledge of disciplines and should be taught within the context of disciplines.Faculty are both disciplinary experts and the wielders of grades in their courses. Students view them as having expertise and power and will use them as models.disassociating IL from the library means IL will be perceived as part of a course or discipline and not as an add-on or “hoop.”

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