Career and leadership development – creating an effective process through insightful partnering<br />Case Study by Dr Joha...
Outline of presentation<br /><ul><li>Setting the context
Emphasising the pivotal roles of managerial leaders in leadership development
Engaging with your managers and leaders using rigorous frameworks of managing
Understanding what it is managerial leaders actually do and postures they adopt
Reconciling best-practice leadership prescriptions with the real nature of managing
Questions and answers</li></li></ul><li>Let’s look at the most famouscorporate university …<br />Jack Welch: Management Ev...
For Crotonville-like success it is clear that...<br />…theCEO must visibly lead the development process by participating i...
Tichy provides a fuller set of “Lessons for CEOs” from his time at Crotonville<br /><ul><li>Leadership should choose the c...
Powerful links here to values management
Timing is critical
Development takes time
Blended learning: 80% = real-life experiences + 20% = formal development programmes</li></ul>Source: “Crotonville: A Stagi...
Crotonville also had a powerful guiding framework used for leadership development with a long history<br />1960Wilfred Bro...
The Crotonville story provides three key take-awaysfor this presentation<br />1<br />Leadership development should not be ...
There are several Jaques-inspired models that are much more familiar to business people…<br />Drotter’s “Leadership Pipeli...
…but for environments not “ready” for SST-like rigour, competency frameworks with BARS are often used<br />Note: BARS = be...
My current engagement is a to conduct a “leadership skills inventory” for a large provincial department<br />Assessment fo...
To handlestyle I use Mintzberg’smodel of managingwhichiscomprehensive, coherent and interactive<br />Source: “Managing”, (...
Managers adoptdifferentposturesin managingwhichresultfromtheirparticularemphasis of roles<br />25 sub-roles<br />Source: “...
The surveywillalsosolicit the different SMS member’spreferences, strengths and weaknesses<br />Maintain the boundary condi...
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Johan du Toit Decipher

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Johan du Toit Decipher

  1. 1. Career and leadership development – creating an effective process through insightful partnering<br />Case Study by Dr Johan du Toit<br />6 May 2010<br />
  2. 2. Outline of presentation<br /><ul><li>Setting the context
  3. 3. Emphasising the pivotal roles of managerial leaders in leadership development
  4. 4. Engaging with your managers and leaders using rigorous frameworks of managing
  5. 5. Understanding what it is managerial leaders actually do and postures they adopt
  6. 6. Reconciling best-practice leadership prescriptions with the real nature of managing
  7. 7. Questions and answers</li></li></ul><li>Let’s look at the most famouscorporate university …<br />Jack Welch: Management Evangelist <br />John F. Welch Jr. did not invent Six Sigma or many of the processes that made him famous in the 20 years that he led GE . But the relentlessly curious and blunt guy imbued his corporation with an energy and culture that made it - and him - an icon of American business.Welch, who joined GE in 1960 with a PhD in chemical engineering and became CEO in 1981, held few things sacred. He…was famous for annually lopping off the bottom 10% of his managers. But Welch made it his mission to manage and foster top talent with hawk-like attention. "Jack put his time and energy into developing people," says Noel M. Tichy, the management professor who helped<br />Welch revitalize his Crotonville training center. Welch transformed<br />routine meetings into rousing debate sessions and launched initiatives such as the Six<br />Sigma quality process and the Workout approach to team problem-solving that touched practically every employee around the planet.As a result, GE developed what many consider the deepest bench of executive talent in American business. In the years leading up to Welch's retirement in 2001, he helped to<br />develop several contenders for his job. When Jeffrey R. Immelt was chosen, the losers immediately became chief executives at 3M and Home Depot Inc. <br />But Welch-style training programs are as popular as ever. Shanghai now boasts its own Crotonville-style facility and GE's management prowess still inspires envy. Cultivating top talent is part of the GE brand, with competitors worldwide striving to mimic the systems that Jack built.<br />Source: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/04_43/b3905032_mz072.htm<br />
  8. 8. For Crotonville-like success it is clear that...<br />…theCEO must visibly lead the development process by participating in the overall design and architecture, delivery, and integration of the development process as it gets tied to succession planning and rewards. This is not a voluntary, open university-type approach to development. It is a very personal tool of the top leadership of the organization as well as a vey central part of the organization effectiveness.<br />- Noel Tichy, Crotonville head (‘85-’87)<br />Source: “Crotonville: A Staging Ground for Corporate Revolution” (1989), page 105<br />
  9. 9. Tichy provides a fuller set of “Lessons for CEOs” from his time at Crotonville<br /><ul><li>Leadership should choose the characteristics that will fit (or deliberately change) the culture
  10. 10. Powerful links here to values management
  11. 11. Timing is critical
  12. 12. Development takes time
  13. 13. Blended learning: 80% = real-life experiences + 20% = formal development programmes</li></ul>Source: “Crotonville: A Staging Ground for Corporate Revolution” (1989), page 105-106<br />
  14. 14. Crotonville also had a powerful guiding framework used for leadership development with a long history<br />1960Wilfred Brown’s Exploration in Management book published in UK and US<br />Early 1970s Walter Mahler read Brown’s 1960 book and adopted the concepts into his consulting framework. Developed Career Crossroads to identify when managers matured into the next stratum and would benefit from additional education in leadership at that level<br />Mid-1970s Walter Mahler installed the Career Crossroads concepts at General Electric. <br />1978-1981 Jack Welch selected as Chairman and CEO of General Electric using Mahler’s version of Brown’s strata capability<br />1984 Welch reconceptualizedCrotonville to infuse Mahler’s career bands and crossroads model of leadership development<br />Source: http://globalro.org/en/go-library/ro-history/ro-in-united-states.html<br />
  15. 15. The Crotonville story provides three key take-awaysfor this presentation<br />1<br />Leadership development should not be “outsourced” wholesale to HRD » should be leader-led and HRD-supported<br />2<br />Leadership development models must be clearly linked to developmental stages » Jaques’ SST (stratified-systems theory) sits behind most models<br />3<br />Leadership development models must be deliberately tied to culture & values » Mintzberg’s work of styles of managing is powerful to illuminate this area<br />Focus of rest of presentation<br />
  16. 16. There are several Jaques-inspired models that are much more familiar to business people…<br />Drotter’s “Leadership Pipeline”<br />BIOSS + Hoebeke levels-of-work<br />
  17. 17. …but for environments not “ready” for SST-like rigour, competency frameworks with BARS are often used<br />Note: BARS = behaviourally anchored rating scale<br />Source: http://www.nhsleadershipqualities.nhs.uk/<br />
  18. 18. My current engagement is a to conduct a “leadership skills inventory” for a large provincial department<br />Assessment focus = BARS + “Style” <br />
  19. 19. To handlestyle I use Mintzberg’smodel of managingwhichiscomprehensive, coherent and interactive<br />Source: “Managing”, (2009) by Mintzberg, p. 48<br />
  20. 20. Managers adoptdifferentposturesin managingwhichresultfromtheirparticularemphasis of roles<br />25 sub-roles<br />Source: “Managing”, (2009) by Mintzberg, p. 90<br />
  21. 21. The surveywillalsosolicit the different SMS member’spreferences, strengths and weaknesses<br />Maintain the boundary conditions of theirorg’n:<br />Linking and dealing<br />Keep the organisation on course:<br />Doing, leading or controlling and communicating<br />Manage ‘hands-off’ on the information plane:<br />Controlling<br />
  22. 22. BACKUP<br />
  23. 23. The most famous corporate university in the world...<br />OCTOBER 25, 2004 THE GREAT INNOVATORS <br />Jack Welch: Management Evangelist <br />Under his leadership, GE developed the deepest bench of executive talent in U.S. business <br />As part of its anniversary celebration, BusinessWeek is presenting a series of weekly profiles of the greatest innovators of the past 75 years. Some made their mark in science or technology; others in management, finance, marketing, or government. For profiles of all the innovators we've published so far, and more, go to www.businessweek.com/innovators/<br />John F. Welch Jr. did not invent Six Sigma or many of the processes that made him famous in the 20 years that he led General Electric Co. (GE ). But the relentlessly curious and blunt guy from Peabody (Mass.) imbued his corporation with an energy and culture that made it -- and him -- an icon of American business.Through his own proselytizing personality, penchant for pithy slogans, and a rigorous performance system that demanded every manager become a mentor, Welch turned a disparate conglomerate into a global teaching organization. He inderstood that great talent was at least as important as great products. In the process, he showed how a vast, complex company could stay nimble and hungry even as it dominated rivals.Welch, who joined GE in 1960 with a PhD in chemical engineering and became CEO in 1981, held few things sacred. He regularly jettisoned nonperforming units and was famous for annually lopping off the bottom 10% of his managers. But Welch made it his mission to manage and foster top talent with hawk-like attention. Every April he would clear his agenda to visit each business and review the performance of thousands of high-potential employees through a grueling process known as Session C. Up-and-coming leaders were moved around the 300,000-strong company and judged, among other things, on how well they were leading and nurturing others. Welch would prod and praise them, sending out a flurry of handwritten notes, or champagne to spouses, for a task well done. "Jack put his time and energy into developing people," says Noel M. Tichy, the University of Michigan management professor who helped Welch revitalize his Crotonville training center in New York's Hudson Valley. The center annually draws more than 8,000 employees for leadership training alone. Welch transformed routine meetings into rousing debate sessions and launched initiatives such as the Six Sigma quality process and the Workout approach to team problem-solving that touched practically every employee around the planet.As a result, GE developed what many consider the deepest bench of executive talent in American business. In the years leading up to Welch's retirement in 2001, he helped to develop several contenders for his job. When Jeffrey R. Immelt was chosen, the losers immediately became chief executives at 3M (MMM ) and Home Depot Inc. (ABS ). Contrast that record with the succession angst that has played out in other American icons such as Walt Disney Co. (DIS ) and Coca Cola Co. (KO ).Welch had his weak spots. His talent hunt seemed to capture mostly white men, with few minorities and women in the upper ranks. His fierce resistance to cleaning up the toxic chemicals that GE had dumped into the Hudson River between the 1940s and mid-1970s also did little to enhance his reputation as a model corporate citizen. Even his lavish retirement perks, which Welch and GE insist were justified, look ill-considered in today's transparent corporate climate.But Welch-style training programs are as popular as ever. Shanghai now boasts its own Crotonville-style facility and GE's management prowess still inspires envy. Cultivating top talent is part of the GE brand, with competitors worldwide striving to mimic the systems that Jack built.By Diane Brady<br />Source: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/04_43/b3905032_mz072.htm<br />
  24. 24. The public sector uses the DPSA’s 11 Core Management Criteria – which do not have a BARS<br />
  25. 25. Jaques’requisite organisation theory<br />“Creativity and innovation, like freedom and liberty, depend not upon soft pedalling organisation, but upon the development of institutions with the kind of constraint and opportunities that can enable us to live and work together harmoniously, effectively and creatively.”<br />- Elliott Jaques<br />
  26. 26. Jaques spent much time defining ‘work’ and what it actually is....<br />‘…the exercise of judgement and discretion in order to carry out a TASK’<br />= an assignment to produce an output of specified quantity and qualitywithin a given time and with allocated resources, for a given purpose (context) and within prescribed limits of action and behaviour(e.g. policies, procedures etc.)<br />
  27. 27. Jaques’ levels-of-workresearchgrew out of years of searchingand wasinspiredwhileworkingwith unions!<br /> 7 Different levels of work<br />The “internal“ processes enabling the decision-making<br />The “by- when” of the longest task of a role<br />Source: Elliott Jaques (1986), J Appl. Behavioral Science<br />
  28. 28. The problemwith the majority of ’’Bureacracies’’ is not thathierarchyiswrong, but terriblymisapplied<br />Time Span<br />Too Many<br />Just Right<br />Stratum<br />VI<br />10 years<br />V<br />5 years<br />IV<br />2 years<br />III<br />1 year<br />II<br />3 months<br />I<br />1 day<br />
  29. 29. Hoebeke, inspired by Jaques, reallyunderstands the ‘value-add’ of higherlevels…. <br />Source: Luc Hoebeke (1994), Making Work Systems Better<br />
  30. 30. Maturation curvesshow that for most people capabilityincreases, atpredictable rates, withage<br />Source: Elliott Jaques (1986), J Appl. Behavioral Science<br />

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