Historical Development of Fiction

5,443 views

Published on

Slides to accompany lecture on the historical development of fiction for an introductory, undergraduate course in fiction

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Historical Development of Fiction

  1. 1. G-EN270 INTRO TO FICTIONThe HistoricalDevelopment of Fiction Bruce Clary, McPherson College, McPherson, Kansas
  2. 2. G-EN270 INTRO TO ICTIONAR340 WEB-BASEDFDESIGNThree major genres• Novel – long, unified prose narrative• Novella – unified prose narrative of 15,000-50,000 words• Short story – compact, tightly unified prose narrative
  3. 3. G-EN270 INTRO TO ICTIONAR340 WEB-BASEDFDESIGNWestern biases against fiction• Verse the privileged genre• Imaginative literature dangerous• Through the 18th Century, literature expected to be edifying• Prose literature especially because it was “common” language, associated with coarseness
  4. 4. G-EN270 INTRO TO FICTIONPlato’s “Allegory of the Cave”
  5. 5. G-EN270 INTRO TO ICTIONAR340 WEB-BASEDFDESIGNPrecursors of prose fiction• Myths • Parables• Epics • Romances• Fables • Tales
  6. 6. G-EN270 INTRO TO FICTIONLandmarks of the 18th-Century Novel in English Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders 1722 Jonathan Swift, Gullivers Travels 1726 Samuel Richardson, Pamela 1740 Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews 1742 Samuel Richardson, Clarissa 1747 Henry Fielding, Tom Jones 1749 Laurence Stern, Tristram Shandy Ann Radcliff, The Mysteries of Udolpho 1759 1794 Daniel Defoe, The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe Tobias Smollett, Humphry Clinker Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice 1719 1771 1812 1720 1725 1730 1735 1740 1745 1750 1755 1760 1765 1770 1775 1780 1785 1790 1795 1800 1805 1810 1815 1820 1825 1830 1835Lengthy fictional narratives written in prose had appeared sporadically before 1700; examples include the stories in Italian writer Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron (1351-1353), theEnglish romancer Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur (c. 1469), and Don Quixote (1605, 1615), by Miguel de Cervantes of Spain. These early precursors aside, most scholars date thebirth of the modern novel to the eighteenth century.
  7. 7. G-EN270 INTRO TO FICTIONLandmarks of the 19th-Century Novel in English Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter 1850 Herman Melville, Moby-Dick 1851 Harriett Beecher Stowe, Uncle Toms Cabin 1852 Mary Shelley, Frankenstein Charles Dickens, Great Expectations 1818 1861 Sir Walter Scott, Ivanhoe George Eliot, Middlemarch 1819 1872 James Fenimore Cooper, The Last of the Mohicans Henry James, Daisy Miller 1826 1879 Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn 1839 1884 Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights Kate Chopin, The Awakening 1847 1899 1820 1825 1830 1835 1840 1845 1850 1855 1860 1865 1870 1875 1880 1885 1890 1895 1900 1905 1910 1915
  8. 8. G-EN270 INTRO TO FICTIONHistorical Development of Modern Short Fiction James Joyce, Dubliners 1914 Hawthorne, Mosses from an Old Manse Constance Garnett, English Translation of Anton Chekhovs Stories 1846 1916 Herman Melville, "Bartleby, the Scrivener" Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio 1853 1919 THE REALISTIC SHORT STORY 1853 - 1920 Ernest Hemingway, In Our Time 1925 THE PROSE TALE REGIONAL, or "LOCAL COLOR" STORIES 1819 - 1852 1870 - 1900 William Faulkner, "A Rose for Emily" 1931 Washington Irving, The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon Gustave Flaubert, Three Tales DIVERSE CONTEMPORARY FICTION 1820 1877 1946 - 2005 Edgar Allan Poe, "A MS. Found in a Bottle" Guy de Maupassant, "Ball of Fat" Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man 1833 1880 1952 Nathaniel Hawthorne, Twice-told Tales Kate Chopin, Bayou Folk Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Leaf Storm 1837 1894 1955 NATURALISM MINIMALISM Poe, Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque 1840 1894 - 1930 1975 - 1990 MODERNISM Poe, Tales Raymond Carver, Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? 1845 1912 - 1945 1976 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030

×