A Really Simple Guide to Digital Inclusion

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Created to share ideas from the National Digital Conference 09 in London and to start discussions on digital inclusion in organisations and networks.
Thanks for useful feedback at http://net.digitalengagement.org/profiles/blogs/sharing-the-digital-inclusion

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  • A Really Simple Guide to Digital Inclusion

    1. 1. You are invited to participate: the really simple guide to digital inclusion Made in Staffordshire by Clare-Marie White (@clarewhite). CC:BY license: feel free to adapt and reuse with attributions. Sources: UK Online Centres, DCLG, Cabinet Office, Netmums, Flickr Creative Commons, UK Civil Service, WEA West Midlands, Twitter, Ning, Worldle, icanhaz.com
    2. 2. Why? the really simple guide to digital inclusion • Reaching many people is easier and cheaper than ever before 273,000 DVLA car tax discs are sold weekly • Social exclusion strongly Traffic to Twitter in the UK increased by 974% in overlaps with digital exclusion last year 35% of households do not have access to the internet • People online are helping each other 70% of people who live in social Money Saving Expert reported 6.4 million housing aren’t online visitors in December alone with 3 million people receiving a weekly email The government spends an estimated £57.9bn each year trying to prevent and solve the problems of the most excluded 1.3 million people in our country; people who have three or more serious, often interconnected problems.
    3. 3. the really simple guide to digital inclusion Latest from the Power of Information government • Digital inclusion is “the use of technology, either response: directly or indirectly, to improve the life chances of * Open information - To have an people and the places in which they live”. effective voice, people need to be able to understand what is going on in their public services; If ignored the links between social and digital government will publish exclusion create a missed opportunity all round. information about public services in ways that are easy to find, use, The individuals concerned are missing out on social, and re-use. * Open feedback - The public financial, educational and employment opportunities. should have a fair say about their services. You are also missing out on new and innovative ways * Open conversation - We will of tackling social issues, delivering services and promote greater engagement through more interactive online reducing the associated costs of social exclusion to consultation and collaboration. We society – DCLG will also empower professionals to be active on online peer-support networks in their area of work.
    4. 4. How? Fish where the fish are & build your own pond Social Marketing in brief: http://icanhaz.com/manyfishes
    5. 5. How? Fish where the fish are & build your own pond Social Marketing in brief: http://icanhaz.com/manyfishes
    6. 6. How? Fish where the fish are & build your own pond Social Marketing in brief: http://icanhaz.com/manyfishes
    7. 7. How? Your website: The digitally included public • a central source of high quality information that can be easily online in any of found and shared their chosen settings • tools for staff, the public and intermediaries to use How information flows: • RSS feeds for subscribing, Digitally confident service reading and sharing • social forums linking to helpful providers, mentors, information community volunteers • intermediaries supporting transfer of information and feedback between the web and ‘real life’ • multimedia content and discussion to help wide understanding The digitally excluded, wherever they are The ‘refusers’, wherever they are
    8. 8. Discuss • Communications policies: what are the permissions and boundaries that need to be explicit to staff or members in order that they can be effective ambassadors for our organisation? • Digital literacy and professional skills: do staff have the knowledge and confidence to participate in online communities? Do they know about sites where they learn, collaborate and reflect? • Website: does our website have • An interconnected, cross-promoting organisation: as people adequate, up-to-date information that can come across our work in many different ways, have our members, be shared easily on social networks? Can staff and partners got adequate information to cross-promote our we make use of RSS feeds so people can work and identify areas of potential, particularly with subscribe to relevant content and share it disconnected/disadvantaged communities? in other sites where people might be interested in what we are doing? • Internal peer support: is everyone aware of the internal communication tools that we have and could we have more effective social networking tools for people to share advice and experiences?
    9. 9. Discuss • Communications policies: what are the permissions and boundaries that need to be explicit to staff or members in order that they can be effective ambassadors for our organisation? • Digital literacy and professional skills: do staff have the knowledge and confidence to participate in online communities? Do they know about sites where they learn, collaborate and reflect? • Website: does our website have • An interconnected, cross-promoting organisation: as people adequate, up-to-date information that can come across our work in many different ways, have our members, be shared easily on social networks? Can staff and partners got adequate information to cross-promote our we make use of RSS feeds so people can work and identify areas of potential, particularly with subscribe to relevant content and share it disconnected/disadvantaged communities? in other sites where people might be interested in what we are doing? • Internal peer support: is everyone aware of the internal communication tools that we have and could we have more effective social networking tools for people to share advice and experiences?
    10. 10. Discuss • Communications policies: what are the permissions and boundaries that need to be explicit to staff or members in order that they can be effective ambassadors for our organisation? • Digital literacy and professional skills: do staff have the knowledge and confidence to participate in online communities? Do they know about sites where they learn, collaborate and reflect? • Website: does our website have • An interconnected, cross-promoting organisation: as people adequate, up-to-date information that can come across our work in many different ways, have our members, be shared easily on social networks? Can staff and partners got adequate information to cross-promote our we make use of RSS feeds so people can work and identify areas of potential, particularly with subscribe to relevant content and share it disconnected/disadvantaged communities? in other sites where people might be interested in what we are doing? • Internal peer support: is everyone aware of the internal communication tools that we have and could we have more effective social networking tools for people to share advice and experiences?
    11. 11. Guidelines for online participation: a starting point - If you are representing an organisation, say so. - never give out personal details like home address or phone number. - remember that your online comments are permanent and can be republished. Be aware of libel, defamation, copyright and data protection laws and remember you are responsible for whatever you post. - do not disclose information, make commitments or do anything on behalf of your organisation unless you have permission to do so. - online participation may attract media interest - always take care whether you are participating in an official or a personal capacity. - political discussion and comment will not be appropriate for people in some jobs. Individuals all need to think about how their online activities (and even, potentially, content that is put online without their knowledge) may impact on their professional work in the present and future. In short: 1. Be credible Be accurate, fair, thorough and transparent. 2. Be consistent Encourage constructive criticism and deliberation. Be cordial, honest and professional at all times. 3. Be responsive When you gain insight, share it where appropriate. 4. Be integrated Wherever possible, align online participation with other offline communications. 5. Be an ambassador for your organisation Wherever possible, disclose your position as a representative of your department or agency. Adapted from: http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/about/work/codes/participation-online.aspx
    12. 12. Guidelines for online participation: a starting point - If you are representing an organisation, say so. - never give out personal details like home address or phone number. - remember that your online comments are permanent and can be republished. Be aware of libel, defamation, copyright and data protection laws and remember you are responsible for whatever you post. - do not disclose information, make commitments or do anything on behalf of your organisation unless you have permission to do so. - online participation may attract media interest - always take care whether you are participating in an official or a personal capacity. - political discussion and comment will not be appropriate for people in some jobs. Individuals all need to think about how their online activities (and even, potentially, content that is put online without their knowledge) may impact on their professional work in the present and future. In short: 1. Be credible Be accurate, fair, thorough and transparent. 2. Be consistent Encourage constructive criticism and deliberation. Be cordial, honest and professional at all times. 3. Be responsive When you gain insight, share it where appropriate. 4. Be integrated Wherever possible, align online participation with other offline communications. 5. Be an ambassador for your organisation Wherever possible, disclose your position as a representative of your department or agency. Adapted from: http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/about/work/codes/participation-online.aspx

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