Faculty Workshop: Student Research - Designing the Process, Improving the Product

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Faculty research assignment design workshop given at the Claremont Colleges Library in late August 2013. Workshop LibGuide can be found at http://libguides.libraries.claremont.edu/2013facultyworkshop

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Faculty Workshop: Student Research - Designing the Process, Improving the Product

  1. 1. D E S I G N I N G   T H E   P R O C E S S ,   Claremont  Colleges  Library   August  2013   I M P R O V I N G   T H E   P R O D U C T   STUDENT   RESEARCH:  
  2. 2. Welcome   Kevin  Mulroy   A.J.  McFadden  Dean   of     The  Claremont  Colleges  Library  
  3. 3. a g e n d a   1.  Frame  1:  Backward  Design   2.  Frame  2:  InformaSon  Literacy   3.  Outcomes   4.  Evidence   5.  Assignments  (Strategies)   6.  Assessment   7.  Debrief  &  Lunch  
  4. 4. w e b s i t e                 libguides.libraries.claremont.edu/   2013facultyworkshop    
  5. 5. Part  1  –  Backward  Design   Char  Booth  
  6. 6. { }w i g g i n s   &   m c = g h e   B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N   ?
  7. 7. { }w i g g i n s   &   m c = g h e   c o n c e p t s   &   c o n t e n t   s t r a t e g i e s   o u t c o m e s   T Y P I C A L   D E S I G N  
  8. 8. { }w i g g i n s   &   m c = g h e   o u t c o m e s   e v i d e n c e   s t r a t e g i e s   B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N  
  9. 9. { }w i g g i n s   &   m c = g h e   B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N  
  10. 10. { }w i g g i n s   &   m c = g h e   B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N  
  11. 11. { }w i g g i n s   &   m c = g h e   B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N  
  12. 12. { }w i g g i n s   &   m c = g h e   B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N  
  13. 13. { }t r u s t y   t e m p l a t e   B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N  
  14. 14. Part  2  -­‐  InformaSon  Literacy   Kimberly  Franklin  
  15. 15. I N F O R M A T I O N   L I T E R A C Y   •  In 2000, the ACRL published a general definition of information literacy (IL) that all postsecondary institutions can use as a foundation for integrating IL into teaching, research, and learning. •  Many institutions have adopted a local definition of IL that reflects the unique teaching, research, and learning environment of the institution. •  Our definition of IL at the Claremont Colleges is based on the core concept of Critical Habits of Mind.
  16. 16. I N F O R M A T I O N   L I T E R A C Y   @   C C L   Informa(on  Literacy  at  the  Claremont  Colleges:  Engaging  Cri(cal   Habits  of  Mind       InformaSon  literacy  is  the  ability  to  use  criScal  thinking  to  create   meaningful  knowledge  from  informaSon.  The  informaSon  literate   Claremont  Colleges  student:     •  Engages  in  a  process  of  inquiry  in  order  to  frame  intellectual   challenges  and  idenSfy  research  needs;     •  Accesses,  evaluates,  and  communicates  informaSon  effecSvely;     •  Provides  aPribu=on  for  source  materials  used;   •  And  develops  insight  into  the  social,  legal,  economic,  and  ethical   aspects  of  informaSon  creaSon,  use,  access,  and  durability.  
  17. 17. Cri(cal  Habits  of  Mind       1  Inquiry  -­‐  interpreSng  assignments,  developing  a  research  strategy,   quesSons,  and  thesis  to  facilitate  strategic  informaSon  discovery  and  access,   research  tool  and  source  selecSon         2  Evalua=on  -­‐  resource  analysis,  inference,  and  revision  of  research  strategy       3  Communica=on  -­‐  synthesis,  integraSon,  contextualizaSon,  use,  and   presentaSon  of  evidence  in  scholarship  and  creaSve  work       4  APribu=on  -­‐  providing  clear  source  documentaSon  in  wriSng  as  well  as   media  and  other  non-­‐textual  work  in  order  to  engage  in  a  scholarly   conversaSon       5  Insight  -­‐  criScal  understanding  of  the  social,  legal,  economic,  and  ethical   aspects  of  informaSon  creaSon,  use,  access,  and  durability   I N F O R M A T I O N   L I T E R A C Y   @   C C L  
  18. 18. { } B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N   I N F O R M A T I O N   L I T E R A C Y  
  19. 19. { } B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N   I N F O R M A T I O N   L I T E R A C Y   “publishable quality” what   does   really   mean?  
  20. 20. { } B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N   I N F O R M A T I O N   L I T E R A C Y   translating expert language
  21. 21. { }w i g g i n s   &   m c = g h e   o u t c o m e s   e v i d e n c e   s t r a t e g i e s   B A C K W A R D   D E S I G N  
  22. 22. Part  3  –  Learning  Outcomes   Dani  Brecher  
  23. 23. { }   What  do  we  want       our  students  to       BE ABLE TO DO?   L E A R N I N G   O U T C O M E S  
  24. 24. { }NOT What  do  you  want  students  to  know?     OR What  do  you  want  students  to  do?   L E A R N I N G   O U T C O M E S   (content  focused)   (assignment  focused)  
  25. 25. { } L E A R N I N G   O U T C O M E S   •  Observable   •  Measurable   •  Completed  by  the  learner  
  26. 26. { } L E A R N I N G   O U T C O M E S   •  What  do  you  want  students  to   know?   •  What  do  you  want  students  to   be  able  to  do?   •  Why  is  this  difficult  for  them  to   know/do  on  their  own?   G U I D I N G   Q U E S T I O N S  
  27. 27. 1 s t -­‐ Y E A R   I L   L E A R N I N G   O U T C O M E S   1  Inquiry     •  Clearly  define  a  research  or  informaSon  need  based  on  a  correct   interpretaSon  of  assignment  parameters   •  Develop  basic  strategies  (e.g.,  defining  keyword  terms,  selecSng  arScle   databases)  to  begin  an  effecSve  research  process       2  Evalua=on     •  Evaluate  search  results  in  order  to  select  sources  that  are  broadly  appropriate   to  their  topic   •  DisSnguish  between  basic  types  of  informaSon  (e.g.,  scholarly  v.  popular,   primary  v.  secondary)   •  Revise  keyword  terms/source  bases  as  needed  to  return  relevant  results       3  Communica=on     •  EffecSvely  integrate  appropriate  informaSon  sources  to  support  an  argument   or  posiSon   •  Clearly  disSnguish  between  their  own  ideas  and  the  ideas  of  others  in  order  to   demonstrate  an  awareness  of  the  broader  scholarly  conversaSon      
  28. 28. 4  APribu=on   •  Convey  a  preliminary  understanding  of  when,  how,  and  why  to  give   agribuSon  for  sources  used  in  academic  work  by  ciSng  sources  consistently   and  completely     5  Insight     •  DisSnguish  between  insStuSonally  provided  and  open  web  resources   •  Begin  to  recognize  the  universe  of  scholarship  related  to  academic  disciplines           1 s t -­‐ Y E A R   I L   L E A R N I N G   O U T C O M E S  
  29. 29. { }COURSE  TITLE:   The  American  West       BROAD  (STUDENT)  GOAL:   Develop  an  appreciaSon  for  and     understanding  of  the  diversity  of  the   American  West  
  30. 30. •  The  major  themes  of  the  American  West,   such  as  migraSon  and  seglement   •  The  major  scholarship  on  the  period   •  Basics  of  historical  research  methods     WHAT  DO  YOU  WANT  STUDENTS  TO  KNOW?  
  31. 31. •  Demonstrate  their  understanding  of   historical  research  methods     •  Develop  an  argument  in  response  to  the   ideas  of  one  of  the  authors  read  in  class   regarding  the  uniqueness  of  the  American   experience   WHAT   DO   YOU   WANT   STUDENTS     T O   B E   A B L E   T O   D O ?  
  32. 32.    Develop  an  argument  in  response  to  the  ideas  of  one  of   the  authors  read  in  class  regarding  the  uniqueness  of   the  American  experience   •  Clearly  define  the  expectaSons  of  the  assignment   •  Find  the  ideas  of  scholars   •  Evaluate  sources  and  determine  their  appropriateness  to  the   assignment   •  Revise  the  quesSon  based  on  the  scholarly  conversaSon  and  determine   a  reasonable  argument   •  Select  appropriate  support  scholarship  based  on  the  final  quesSon  and   argument   •  Integrate  their  own  and  scholarly  ideas  into  an  effecSve  argument   USEFUL  OUTCOMES  ARE  SPECIFIC  OUTCOMES  
  33. 33. When  students  enter  class...   •  They  don't  know  the  history  of  the  period   •  They  don't  know  how  to  find  scholarship  on  the   American  West   •  They  don't  know  the  important  scholars  of   American  West  or  the  major  arguments   •  They  don’t  know  historical  research  methods   WHY   WOULD   THESE   LEARNING   OUTCOMES     B E   D I F F I C U L T   F O R   S T U D E N T S ?  
  34. 34. { } L E A R N I N G   O U T C O M E S   •  What  do  you  want  students  to   know?   •  What  do  you  want  students  to   be  able  to  do?   •  Why  is  this  difficult  for  them  to   know/do  on  their  own?   G U I D I N G   Q U E S T I O N S  
  35. 35. Part  4  -­‐  Evidence    Cynthia  Cohen    
  36. 36. { }   HOW WILL WE KNOW if  our  students  understand     the  big  picture?   if  our  students  have  achieved   specific  learning  outcomes?     E V I D E N C E  
  37. 37. { } COURSE  TITLE:   The  American  West     BROAD  OUTCOME:   Develop  an  argument  in  response  to     the  ideas  of  one  of  the  authors  read     in  class  regarding  the  uniqueness     of  the  American  experience      
  38. 38.     Develop  an  argument  in  response  to  the  ideas  of  one   of  the  authors  read  in  class  regarding  the  uniqueness     of  the  American  experience     S P E C I F I C   L E A R N I N G   O U T C O M E S   •  Clearly  define  the  expectaSons  of  the  assignment   •  Find  the  ideas  of  scholars   •  Evaluate  sources  and  determine  their  appropriateness  to   the  assignment   •  Revise  the  quesSon  based  on  the  scholarly  conversaSon   and  determine  a  reasonable  argument   •  Select  appropriate  support  scholarship  based  on  the  final   quesSon  and  argument   •  Integrate  their  own  and  scholarly  ideas  into  an  effecSve   argument  
  39. 39.    BROAD  OUTCOME   Develop  an  argument  in  response  to  the  ideas  of  one   of  the  authors  read  in  class  regarding  the  uniqueness     of  the  American  experience   SPECIFIC  LEARNING  OUTCOME   •  Clearly  define  the  expectaSons  of  the  assignment   EVIDENCE   •  Respond  to  all  elements  of  an  academic  prompt   •  ArSculate  discrete  steps  required   •  Relate  a  chosen  topic  to  historical  context  and   themes  discussed  in  class   EXAMPLE   OUTCOME   #1   +   EVIDENCE  
  40. 40.    BROAD  OUTCOME   Develop  an  argument  in  response  to  the  ideas  of  one   of  the  authors  read  in  class  regarding  the  uniqueness     of  the  American  experience   SPECIFIC  LEARNING  OUTCOME   •  Find  the  ideas  of  scholars   EVIDENCE   •  Cite  secondary  scholarly  sources  (not  assigned  in   class)  relaSng  to  the  student’s  argument   EXAMPLE   OUTCOME   #2   +   EVIDENCE  
  41. 41. Learning  Outcomes   What  we  want  students  to  be  able  to  do   Evidence   Observable,  measurable  indicators  that  students   have  achieved  a  learning  outcome   Research  Assignments   Ac=vi=es  that  guide  students  to  produce   evidence   Assessment   Measures  extent/quality  of  student  achievement   VIEWING   THE   PIECES   IN   CONTEXT  
  42. 42. { } E V I D E N C E   •  Observable   •  Measurable   •  AcSon  verbs   •  Not  necessarily  text-­‐based   C H A R A C T E R I S T I C S  
  43. 43. { }NOT the  assignment  itself     OR a  specific  measurement  of     how  much  students  have  achieved   or  how  well  students  have  done   E V I D E N C E  
  44. 44. { } E V I D E N C E   •  How  will  students  demonstrate   what  they  can  do?   •  What  indicators  will  show  me  that   students  “get  it”?   •  What  aspects  of  student   achievement  will  I  want  to     measure  (assess)?   G U I D I N G   Q U E S T I O N S  
  45. 45. Part  5  –  Assignments     Gale  Burrow  &  Natalie  Tagge  
  46. 46.   Assignments:  Strategies  that   you  develop  that  provide   evidence  that  students  are   learning  –  achieving  your   learning  outcomes.   { }
  47. 47.   BROAD  OUTCOME   Develop  an  argument  in  response  to  the  ideas  of  one  of  the   authors  read  in  class  regarding  the  uniqueness  of  the  American   experience.   SPECIFIC  LEARNING  OUTCOME   •  Find  the  ideas  of  scholars   EVIDENCE   •  Cite  secondary  scholarly  sources  (not  assigned  in   class)  relaSng  to  the  student’s  argument     Assignment:   •  Develop  an  annotated  bibliography.  For  each  entry   the  annotaSon  should  state  how  the  arScle  is   relevant  to  the  student’s  argument.  
  48. 48.   BROAD  OUTCOME   Develop  an  argument  in  response  to  the  ideas  of  one  of  the   authors  read  in  class  regarding  the  uniqueness  of  the  American   experience.     SPECIFIC  LEARNING  OUTCOME   •  Clearly  define  the  research  need  of  the  assignment   EVIDENCE   •  Respond  to  all  elements  of  an  academic  prompt   •  ArSculate  discrete  steps  required   •  Relate  a  chosen  topic  to  historical  context  and  themes   discussed  in  class     Assignment:    
  49. 49. { }SCAFFOLDING   research  assignments  
  50. 50. When  students  enter  class...   •  They  don't  know  the  history  of  the  period   •  They  don't  know  how  to  find  scholarship  on  the   American  West   •  They  don't  know  the  important  scholars  of   American  West  or  the  major  arguments   •  They  don’t  know  historical  research  methods   WHY  IS  IT  DIFFICULT  FOR  STUDENTS  TO   ACHIEVE  YOUR  LEARNING  OUTCOMES?  
  51. 51. WHY  USE  SCAFFOLDING?   •  Explicitly  idenSfies  everything  students  should  do  to   complete  the  assignment.   •  Allows  for  more  intervenSon  at  the  point  where  it’s   most  useful.   •  Creates  assignments  that  build  on  one  another.   •  Ensures  that  students  include  all  the  steps  you  want  to   see.   •  Increases  consistency  in  grading  since  students  will  be   less  likely  to  take  the  assignment  in  different  direcSons   based  on  their  individual  interpretaSons  of  what  they   are  supposed  to  do.  
  52. 52. { }What  are  some   nontradiSonal  research   assignments  you  have  used   in  a  course?  
  53. 53. { } A S S I G N M E N T S   •  How  will  scaffolding  help  students   provide  evidence  that  they  are   meeSng  learning  outcomes?       •  What  are  the  best  strategies  for   giving  students  an  opportunity  to   provide  evidence  of  learning?     G U I D I N G   Q U E S T I O N S  
  54. 54. Part  6  -­‐  Assessment   Sara  Lowe  
  55. 55. Building  a  Rubric  –  Outcomes   •  Develop  an  appropriate  research   quesSon   •  Find  the  ideas  of  scholars   •  Revise  the  quesSon  based  on  the   scholarly  conversaSon  and   determine  a  reasoned  argument   •  Select  appropriate  support   scholarship  based  on  the  final   quesSon  and  argument   •  Integrate  your  own  and  scholars'   ideas  into  an  effecSve  argument   •  Agribute  sources  appropriately,   be  consistent  in  using   bibliographic  style   •  Research  QuesSon/Argument   •  Sources   •  CommunicaSon    
  56. 56. Plonng  the  Categories   Outcomes   Level   IniSal   Emerging   Developed   Research  QuesSon/ Argument   Sources     CommunicaSon  
  57. 57. Evidence  in  Rubric   •  Develop  an  appropriate   research  quesSon   –  idenSfy  what  they  already   know  about  the  topic   –  ask  a  research  quesSon   that  is  possible  to  answer   given  the  resources  and   Sme  available  to  them   –  ask  a  ques=on  that  is   relevant  to  the  theme  of   the  course/novel   •  IniSal   –  Research  quesSon  is  not   relevant  to  the  theme  of   the  novel   •  Emerging   –  Research  quesSon  is   relevant  but  takes  work  to   understand   •  Developed   –  Research  quesSon  is   relevant  and  demonstrates   sophisScated  thought    
  58. 58. Plonng  the  Evidence   Outcomes   Level   IniSal   Emerging   Developed   Research  QuesSon/ Argument   •  Research   quesSon  is  not   relevant  to  the   theme  of  the   novel   •  Research   quesSon  is   relevant  but   takes  work  to   understand   •  Research   quesSon  is   relevant  and   demonstrates   sophisScated   thought     Sources     CommunicaSon  
  59. 59. Part  7  –  Debrief  &  Lunch  
  60. 60. { }What’s your takeaway?
  61. 61. w e b s i t e   libguides.libraries.claremont.edu/2013facultyworkshop  

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