Successfully reported this slideshow.

Why Content Professionals and Designers should be best buddies. And how to help it happen.

9

Share

Upcoming SlideShare
Ex comm 130 final
Ex comm 130 final
Loading in …3
×
1 of 41
1 of 41

More Related Content

Why Content Professionals and Designers should be best buddies. And how to help it happen.

  1. 1. Why Content Professionals and Designers need to be best buddies, and how to help it happen. Clara Guasch Fortuny Content Strategy Barcelona MeetUp 2014 01 23
  2. 2. Design and Content: Can’t live without you
  3. 3. Content comes first (ideally). Content needs to be created independently from design (ideally). As professionals, we can keep content and design separate.
  4. 4. For the end user, there is no content without design. Content CONTENT content Content CONTENT Content
  5. 5. Dear Design, Life without you doesn’t make sense. Thank you very much for listening, understanding and handling me with care. Yours, Good Content
  6. 6. 1 Content and Design 1. What matters most? What’s less relevant? http://www.parcdesalutmar.cat/hospitals/hospital-del-mar/
  7. 7. 1 Content and Design 1. What matters most? What’s less relevant? http://www.aiguesdebarcelona.cat/ca/web/web-aguas-debarcelona/inicio
  8. 8. 1 Content and Design 2. Where’s everybody looking? http://www.useit.com/alertbox/reading_pattern.html
  9. 9. 1 Content and Design 2. Where’s everybody looking? www.promentrada.com
  10. 10. 1 Content and Design 3. Short paragraphs with one idea per paragraph work best 5 main ideas www.cga.cat
  11. 11. 1 Content and Design 3. Short paragraphs with one idea per paragraph work best http://www.nancy-tunon.com/ca/escola_teatre/equip
  12. 12. 1 Content and Design 4. Width counts
  13. 13. 1 Content and Design 4. Width counts
  14. 14. 1 Content and Design 4. Width counts If a text is too narrow, people get tired. If a text is too wide, people get lazy.  Let’s find a comfortable width for our text that can help us read without getting a headache and without having to move our heads to reach the end of the line.
  15. 15. 1 Content and Design 5. Light text on dark background is ok for headings, titles and labels only. http://uxmovement.com/content/when-to-use-white-text-on-a-dark-background.
  16. 16. 1 Content and Design 6. Capital letters and underlined text are difficult to read  THIS IS WAY MORE DIFFICULT TO READ THAN THE THIRD LINE. ESPECIALLY IF THE TEXT GETS LONGER.  THIS IS MORE DIFFICULT TO READ THAN THE THIRD LINE. ESPECIALLY IF THE TEXT GETS LONGER.  This is easier to read than the previous lines. Especially if the text gets longer.
  17. 17. 1 Content and Design 7. Floating lists are no good A Content Strategy includes advice on:  tone and style  web structure and message hierarchy  which content you need to create and/or adapt  how to take your users into account  how to plan content creation A Content Strategy includes advice on:  tone and style  web structure and message hierarchy  which content you need to create and/or adapt  how to take your users into account  how to plan content creation  Help me read the introductory text of a list before I jump to the first bullet.
  18. 18. 1 Content and Design 8. Links and only links should look like links.
  19. 19. 1 Content and Design 8. Links and only links should look like links.  If a link doesn’t look like a link, I won’t get to the page you want me to see.  If something looks like a link but it isn’t, I get frustrated. It’s nice to know when a link will kick me out of the page…
  20. 20. 1 Content and Design 9. Adds and only adds should look like adds
  21. 21. 1 Content and Design 9. Adds and only adds should look like adds
  22. 22. 1 Content and Design 10. Videos, graphs, photos and forms need text
  23. 23. 1 Content and Design 10. Videos, graphs, photos and forms need text Vídeos http://www.youtube.com/
  24. 24. 1 Content and Design 10. Videos, graphs, photos and forms need text http://www.bracafe.com/pedidos/index.htm
  25. 25. Dear Content, What would I do without you? Thank you very much for being meaningful, consistent and ready when I come in. Yours, Good Design
  26. 26. Designers and Content professionals Fancy a cup of coffee?
  27. 27. It’s not about you or me. It’s about the user.
  28. 28. 2 Designers and Content Professionals Before the project... 1.      Explore What other projects have they done? How do they generally tackle digital projects? How used are they to working with real content? What do they feel about lorem ipsum? Have they any experience working together with content professionals?  What do they expect from you?
  29. 29. 2 Designers and Content Professionals Before the project... 2. Explain and share  Talk about how and why design is crucial for good content to work.  Explain how you usually tackle projects.  Offer a list of crucial points to take into account when designing for readable content.  Make yourself available for any question or doubt.  Talk positively about your previous experience with other designers.  Share everything you know about the project that can be useful for the designer.
  30. 30. 2 Designers and Content Professionals Before the project... 3. Foresee  What problems and issues are likely to arise?  Can you do anything to avoid or minimize them?  How are you going to handle them?
  31. 31. 2 Designers and Content Professionals Before the project... 4. Agree  Decide together the best way to proceed, taking into account each other’s background.  More than likely, meeting more often at the beginning will save a lot of time and problems in the long run.
  32. 32. 2 Designers and Content Professionals During the project... 1. Show interest and offer help  Show interest on the work that is being done.  Offer to discuss things together.
  33. 33. 2 Designers and Content Professionals During the project... 2. Appreciate  Acknowledge what’s really good in the design as it is and work on making it even better.  Limit your critical comments on functional issues that affect the messages (readability and usability). Hint: ”and” is much better than “but”
  34. 34. 2 Designers and Content Professionals During the project... 3. Listen carefully  What can you learn from the designer’s view of the project?  Are you maybe asking for impossibles?  Be ready to partly give in, compromise.
  35. 35. 2 Designers and Content Professionals During the project... 4. Justify your comments  Don’t make comments based on your personal taste or opinion.  Make critical comments based on usability, readibility and your knowledge about the project.  Make it clear that you’re working to make it easier for the user to find, read, understand and interact with the content.  Don’t offer design solutions (unless you’re a designer yourself!). Hint at the problem, explain it well and ask how it could be solved.
  36. 36. 2 Designers and Content Professionals At the end of the project... 1. Try to do some conscious learning  Think and talk about what has worked out well and what problems and issues have arisen and why.
  37. 37. 2 Designers and Content Professionals At the end of the project... 2. Don’t forget to celebrate the good work done!
  38. 38. Whether content comes first, second or last, it’s not complete until it has shape and color.
  39. 39. Thank you
  40. 40. This document is subject to an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs Creative Commons license. It allows you to download, distribute and publicly present the document as long as you specify its title and author, and as long as it’s used non commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en (C) Clara Guasch Fortuny
  41. 41. www.aclareix.com clara.guasch@aclareix.com

×