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Tactical Packaging Challenges and Solutions for Fresh Seafood by Dr. Sand

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Presentation for Louisiana Food Processor’s Conference 2017 (Feb 2017)

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Tactical Packaging Challenges and Solutions for Fresh Seafood by Dr. Sand

  1. 1. Louisiana Food Processors' Conference Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood Dr Claire Sand February, 2017 Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 1Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  2. 2. Packaging Challenges MANUFACTURER • Reduce contamination during product fill • Assess initial microbial load • Reduce initial microbial load • Enable HACCP, etc • Address chilled worker conditions DISTRIBUTOR/ RETAILER • Enable stock rotation • Time &Temp monitoring system • Oxygen level monitoring system • Control temperature • Reduce microbial load at POS CONSUMER • Refrigerate to Freezer • Heat/Cook in Package • Enable safe package reuse • Reduce consumer contamin from repeat use • Expand time for safe product use • Enable freezer storage Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 2Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  3. 3. Challenges Isolated Into 4 Key Areas Maintain Texture, Flavor, Color, and Nutrients Ensure Low Microbial Growth Add Value to Consumers Add Value to Retailers Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 3Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  4. 4. Available Packaging Solutions MANUFACTURER • Decrease filling time by reducing number of packaging components • Enable more rapid filling • Rapid product sealing • Use antimicrobial packaging RETAILER/ CONSUMER • Edible water vapor barrier • Enable package sterilization • Serving size separators within package • Enhanced product interface • Refine freezer storage options Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 4Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  5. 5. Packaging solutions isolated into 4 key areas Antimicrobial packaging Communicate safety-intelligent packaging Edible packaging Value Chain needed to meet goals Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 5Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  6. 6. Antimicrobial Packaging Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 6Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  7. 7. Increasing Need for Antimicrobial Packaging Market need for Antimicrobial is increasing due to increase in: 1. Resistance of microbes to standard processing technologies 2. Food safety outbreaks • Foodborne disease reaches 30% of the population • Vibrio increased 115% since 2006 3. Need for controlled temperature conditions to inhibit microbial growth 4. Global food distribution in various stages of processing 5. Increase in consumer interest in fresh and multicomponent prepared meals 6. Inability of MAP/CAP technology to accommodate lack of controls in distribution, processing, product 7. Growing urban population in need of food they can not produce 8. High potential for cross contamination • Processing facilities often manufacturer more than one product • Distribution systems between products are often linked Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 7Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  8. 8. 3 ways to convey Antimicrobial activity from the package within a structure as a coating through headspace Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 8Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  9. 9. 3 Ways to Convey Antimicrobial Activity From the Package • For coatings and degradable polymers that contain Antimicrobials, all the Antimicrobial activity is imparted into food • For Antimicrobials within polymers and in indirect contact with the food, the final amount of Antimicrobials within the food is a function of the ratio of Spolymer to Sfood Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 9Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  10. 10. Antimicrobials ORGANIC ACIDS • Benzoic acid and benzoates • Sorbic acid and sorbates • Acetic acid • Propionic acids and propionates • Lysozyme SOME OTHERS • Chlorine dioxide • Triclosan • Silver zeolite, nitrate • Bacteriophages • Maillard reaction end products BACTERIOCINS • Nisin • Pediocin POLYMERS • Chitosan NATURAL EXTRACTS • Cinnamaldehyde • Eugenol • Allyl isothiocyanate • Green tea extract • Various extracts Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 10Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  11. 11. Antimicrobial Options Regulatory • FDA • Most are GRAS • EU • Defined amounts allowed Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 11Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  12. 12. Antimicrobial Packaging Bases • Base materials: cellulose and SPI, zein, WPI, LDPE, Cellophane, paper, chitosan • Format: coating/flexible; encapsulated within structures; coated on substrates • Constraints: seal area, migration rates are product dependent Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 12Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  13. 13. Nisin • Nisin in conjunction with: • Lysozyme resulted in a reduction of E coli • EDTA resulted in a reduction of Listeria and E Coli • Grapeseed/Green tea extract resulted in a reduction of Listeria • Chilled lobster (listeria), salmon (listeria) Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 13Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  14. 14. Nisin - Regulatory • EU • E234 (EEC 1983); EU commission number 215-807-5 • Restrictions to cheese, eggs, puddings • FDA GRAS status (1988) • China • GB2760-86 (1990) • Canned food, plant protein, dairy, meat, prepared meat, cooked meat beverages, condiments, cereals products, convenience rice products, cooked seafood • Global • Harmonized System (HS) code 29419090 • Only bacteriocin approved by the World Health Organization (WHO, 1969) Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 14Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  15. 15. Pediocin • Shellfish • Food safety: Listeria focused spectrum • Food quality: S aureus and B cereus • Lack of approval by EU and WHO/FAO limits research Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 15Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  16. 16. Chitosan • 3 log cycles decay are typical • Chitosan Discrepancies in reported Antimicrobial activity are due to: • Variability (in molecular weight and degree of polymerization) associated with naturally derived products • Reduces the motility of the chitosan and their interaction with microbes due to required cross-linking and/or heat to form • Abundance of research on combinations of chitosan and other antimicrobials • Cinnamaldehyde (Enterobacteriaceae, L Sakei) • Oregano (Listeria, E Coli) • Silver ions (Listeria, E Coli) • Nisin (E Coli, S, aureus, B cereus) • Chitosan/vermiculite nanocomposites • FDA approved Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 16Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  17. 17. Lysozyme • Tuna, sushi • Regulatory • Need for combining with EDTA or lactoferrin to inhibit E coli increases regulatory issues and cost • Lysozyme • FDA GRAS • EU number 1105 • Egg white derivation is potential allergen • EDTA • FDA GRAS • EU number 385 • unprocessed shellfish, processed fish and shellfish Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 17Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  18. 18. • Governed by CFR 21 and updated in the Federal Register • How much of an Antimicrobials can be used is determined by the: • Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) of the Antimicrobials • Estimated Daily Intake (EDI) if Antimicrobials • Kinetics of direct and indirect contact • Often maximum adsorption of Antimicrobials is assumed to allow for temperature abuse and to account for uncontrollable factors • If no data for a substance is present, research to determine the ADI must be conducted • So, most Antimicrobials research and development is done with approved substances Kinetics: Acceptable Limits of Antimicrobial Use Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 18Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  19. 19. Factors Effecting Efficacy of Antimicrobials 1. FOOD PROCESSING CONDITIONS • Food pH, and stability after pH changes • Inactivation by food enzymes • Interaction with food additives/ingredients 2. FOOD SHELF LIFE FACTORS • Food storage temperature • Limited stability during food shelf life 3. MICROBIAL FACTORS • Microbial load • Microbial diversity and the target bacteria • Microbial interactions in the food system • Physiological stage (growing, resting, starving or viable) 4. BARRIERS • Protection by physico- chemical barriers (microcolonies, biofilms, slime) • Barriers enrobing Antimicrobials 5. DEVELOPMENT OF RESISTANCE/ADAPTATION • Predicted to be an issue of concern Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 19Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  20. 20. Antimicrobial Packaging Recommendations -1 • Focus efforts on use of Antimicrobial coatings or within a degrading film to: • Optimize required amount of Antimicrobial • Blend antimicrobials • Reuterin-Bacteriostatic activity against L monocytogenes, S aureus, E coli in combination with nisin and lactoperoxidase • HPP with nisin with lysozyme, lactoferricin, and a synthetic lysozyme-derived peptide increases efficacy • Unique bacteriocins can be generated by either mutating bacteriocin-encoding genes or by fusing genes from different bacterial species • Mutating of ring A within nisin results in enhanced Antimicrobial activity Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 20Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  21. 21. Antimicrobial Packaging Recommendations -1 • Nisin coated vs incorporated to the polymer matrix 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Days of storage logcfu/16cm2 MC NI NC (Mangalassary & Cooksey, unpublished data) Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 21Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  22. 22. Antimicrobial Packaging Recommendations-2 • Ensure consistent amount of Antimicrobial • Avoid reliance of multifaceted kinetics that prevent predictions • Nisin from 2-layer films (EC/HPMC) desorbed in 0 5 h • Nisin from 2-layer films (EC/HPMC/EC) desorbed in 20 h • Controlled release of the Antimicrobial is necessary to extend the shelf life • Done with nanotechnology • Rapid release causes fast antimicrobial “consumption” in a short period of time • Slow release may enable spoilage reactions on the food surface Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 22Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  23. 23. Antimicrobial Packaging Recommendations-2 • Natamycin migration from polyvinyldichloride lacquer coating (Hanusova et al , 2010) (Hanusova et al , 2010) Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 23Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  24. 24. Antimicrobial Packaging Recommendations-2 Use nanocomposite films • Antibacterial activity of gelatin based nanocomposite film against E coli (b) and L monocytogenes (c) (Kanmani & Rhim, 2014) Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 24Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  25. 25. Antimicrobial Food Safety Microbes Food Quality Microbes Categories Tested Packaging Materials Tested FDA EU FAO/WHO Manufacturers Economic Social Issues Technology Innovation Recommendation Nisin Listeria (with Lysozyme); E. coli (with EDTA); Salmonella Not assessed Meat, cheese, seafood, perishable processed food Cellulose and SPI, zein, WPI, LDPE, cellophane, paper, chitosan GRAS E234; Restrictions to cheese, eggs, puddings Approved Numerous Costs are not standard and are based on desired result; concern with resistance promotoes use of other bacteriocins in tandem Increased resistance possible; considered natural Abundance of studies due to nisin’s commercial availability Use bacteriociins synergistically; bioengineering for increased efficacy; refine coating distribution Pursue Pediocin Listeria S. aureus and B. cereus Processed meat (ham, bologna, smoked fish) WPI coated PP, Cellulose GRAS Not approved Minimal Concern with resistance promotoes use of other bacteriocins in tandem Increased resistance possible; considered natural Limited studies Use bacteriociins synergistically; bioengineering for increased efficacy; refine coating distribution Lacticin Clostridia and Listeria S. aureus, Bacillus, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus Cottage cheese, cheese, milk, orange juice, egg, water, ham, turkey breast, smoked salmon Zein, WPI, Paper board with AP; PE, Pectin/PLA composite Cellophane GRAS Not approved Approved by 50+ countries Laboratories Concern with resistance promotoes use of other bacteriocins in tandem Increased resistance possible; considered natural Limited understanding beyond use as additive Use bacteriociins synergistically; bioengineering for increased efficacy; refine coating distribution Pursue Chitosan E. coli S. Aureus, P. fragi, B. subtilis Seafood PVA, PE, carrier of other antimicrobials GRAS Not approved Multiple Innovations and use in water quality and fuel cells may lower prices or increase demand to increase prices Non-toxic, biodegradable, and biocompatible Abundance of research; variability of results due to natural origin Combining with other antimicrobials to increase spectrum; identify optimum molecular weight and polymerization Lysozyme Listeria; E.coli (with lactoferrin or EDTA) S. Aureus, P. fragi, B. subtilis, L. plastarum Tuna; sushi, raw and processed meat Cellulose, paper, zein, SPI, PVOH, surface immobilization GRAS E1105; approved for cheese and beer Numerous chemical companies Need to combine with lactorferrin or EDTA to inhibit E.coli Considered natural Abundance of research; variability of results due to natural origin To attain both Listeria and E. coli inactivity, determine optimum EDTA or lactoferrin concentration Pursue Lactoperoxidase Listeria; E. coli Yeasts, Molds Salmon and roasted turkey, milk, cheese, vegetables •WPI, alginate GRAS No approved Recommen ded when adequate cooling unavailable in dairy Numerous chemical companies Whey derivation lowers cost Advocacy by FAO has increased awareness Efficacy a function of LPS, thiocyanate, and H2O2 Activation by H2O2 Pursue Plant Extracts E. coli (Oregano); Listeria (Neem) S. aureus (Grapefruit seed, green teat) SPI, WPI, chitosan, casein GRAS Approved Approved Numerous Costly due to extraction Taste preferences inhibit use; no labeling issues Not applied beyond laboratory stages Natural/organic platform; improving efficacy Pursue as natural/organic platform Metal ions E.coli , Listeria (Titanium), Ziinc, Silver, Copper); Salmonella (Zinc and nisin) S. aureus Meat, sliced fruit, eggs, orange juice Glass, metal, polymers, chitosan, zein, cellulose Defined amounts Defined amounts Defined amounts Numerous Silver most costly Consumer familiarity; Environmental and increased resistance; Limit migration into food is paramount Nanoparticles most effectives due to shigh surface area Medical research applicable to food packaging Surface Treatments E. coli Antifungal Meat, produce Paperboard, polymers by-products would need approval by-products would need approval by- products would need approval Internal Variable resultant additives require acceptance Skill set within converters Adapt processes from medical packaging; plasma activation; GRAS by-products Pursue to expand core competency Acids, Salts, Anhydrides Listeria and E.coli (Sorbic Acid); Listeria (Lauric acid and EDTA) Yeasts, Molds Meat, produce Coatings on various substrates Most are GRAS Defined amounts allowed Defined amounts allowed Numerous Variable Consumer familiarity Processes of inactivation are well known Refined efficacy Pursue Chlorine Dioxide Listeria, Salmonella Not Evaluated Produce Known permeability to ClO2 Considered a treatment E926 under consideration Numerous Systems in place lowers cost Color issues; Connected to household disinfectant Technology well known Explore ability to recharge system Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 25Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  26. 26. Intelligent packaging Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 26Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  27. 27. Difference Between Active and Intelligent Packaging Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 27Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  28. 28. Intelligent Packaging • Focus on: • TTI • Degradation sensors • No-Fraud assurance packaging • Responsive packaging Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 28Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  29. 29. TTIs TTIs are a refined proven technology • Remain relevant since temperature governs reaction rates and controls microbial growth Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 29Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  30. 30. TTIs • L5-8 Smart Seafood • irreversible color change from the hydrolysis of triglycerides • CoolVu • aluminum layer thins causing a reaction • FreshCode, Varcode andTempix, Tempix • fading barcodes • FreshMeter • turns from blue to gray via benzopyridine photoactivation Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 30Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  31. 31. Degradation Sensors Degradation sensors are advancing rapidly • Direct connection to food deterioration • More sophisticated sensors that convert biochemical signals to electrical responses that show remaining shelf life from manufacturer to consumer Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 31Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  32. 32. Degradation Sensors- Mechanisms • High surface to volume ratio of nanofibrous membranes and electrospun sensors • Based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) • Measures total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN) • Monitors cysteine loss via hydrogen sulfide • Color change indicator that activates as microbial growth increases • Advances in wireless nanosensor networks (WNSNs) • Graphene printing and conductive polymers • enables wireless communication between nanosystems • Incorporate antibodies (for detection) within polymer films Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 32Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  33. 33. Responsive Sensors • Responsive sensors that detect then act to reduce deteriorative reactions • Through the release of CO2, antioxidants or pH change agents • Tremendous amount of IP in this area Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 33Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  34. 34. Authenticity Sensors-Overt and Covert Overt authenticity is refined and solutions exist and line is blended between covert and overt • Overt acts as deterrent and prevention Older solutions • Fiber tear • TE bands Current solutions • Timestrip and Novas - time elapsed since opening • RFID and NFC • Alien Technology, CAENRFID, Convergence Systems • authentiQ, Sicpa, and VerifyMe Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 34Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  35. 35. Authenticity Sensors-Overt and Covert Overt authenticity is refined and solutions exist and line is blended between covert and overt • Covert acts a detection • Current solutions • FluxSecure - glass coated metal thread embedded in packaging • TruTag, Flint Group, Spectra Systems - silicon dioxide based tags • SigNature - printing plant based DNA as barcodes, watermarks, microdots • Genome Trakr - DNA based verification methods • Alpvision - fingerprint within molded caps and bottles • Unisecure - imperfection tracking with a 5-megapixel smart phone Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 35Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  36. 36. Authenticity Sensors Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 36Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  37. 37. Authenticity Sensors Intelligent packaging expands brand image potential Current solutions • Thermochromatic inks change color and reveal images when the product is at the proper temperature to eat or drink • NFC OpenSense package sensor is tapped with a smartphone • Polymark fluorescence based detection for sorting food- contact PET Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 37Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  38. 38. Intelligent Packaging Recommendations • TTI continue to be the standard • For optimum safety, focus on degradation sensors in 1-3 years • Assess branding and authenticity link to balance costs • For nutritional waste reduction and safety, focus on responsive sensors in 3-5 years Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 38Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  39. 39. Edible Packaging Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 39Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  40. 40. Edible Packaging • Focus on • Reduce and not replace synthetic packaging • Freezer burn • Decreasing water loss in fresh seafood • Enhancing product offerings • Cook in bag • Shaped products • Meal kits to align with what retailers are doing Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 40Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  41. 41. The Need for Water Management • Freezer burn • Interfacial water freezes and thaws and ice crystals grow crushing cells • Increased degradation within cells before they burst • Texture loss • Water loss • Loss from product • Loss from package is ($$$) loss Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 41Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  42. 42. Edible Packaging as a Water Vapor Barrier • Alternative to vacuum package • Edible barriers are a robust solution in consumer freezers • Many options and can be linked to antimicrobial barriers Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 42Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  43. 43. Edible Packaging as a Water Vapor Barrier • Realistic assessment • Lipids-wax, fatty acids, glycerides • In a base-proteins, starches, or celluloses derivative • Confused research seafood Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 43Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  44. 44. Edible Packaging to Enhance Product Offerings - Cook in a Bag Enable venting since product is better protected 1. Perforations • (horizontal or in a “patch”) that are coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through holes 2 Laser scored • top layer that is coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through laser cuts that expand when heated • steam generated from within the package bursts through the scoring and automatically ventilates the package 3 Channels that vent air/steam through fin seal area • Consumer slit bag to vent before microwaving 4 Tray in colander Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 44Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  45. 45. Edible Packaging to Enhance Product Offerings - Cook in a Bag Enable venting since product is better protected 1. Perforations • (horizontal or in a “patch”) that are coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through holes 2 Laser scored • top layer that is coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through laser cuts that expand when heated • steam generated from within the package bursts through the scoring and automatically ventilates the package 3 Channels that vent air/steam through fin seal area • Consumer slit bag to vent before microwaving 4 Tray in colander Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 45Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  46. 46. Edible Packaging to Enhance Product Offerings - Cook in a Bag Enable venting since product is better protected 1. Perforations • (horizontal or in a “patch”) that are coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through holes 2 Laser scored • top layer that is coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through laser cuts that expand when heated • steam generated from within the package bursts through the scoring and automatically ventilates the package 3 Channels that vent air/steam through fin seal area • Consumer slit bag to vent before microwaving 4 Tray in colander Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 46Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  47. 47. Enable venting since product is better protected 1. Perforations • (horizontal or in a “patch”) that are coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through holes 2. Laser scored • top layer that is coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through laser cuts that expand when heated • steam generated from within the package bursts through the scoring and automatically ventilates the package 3 Channels that vent air/steam through fin seal area • Consumer slit bag to vent before microwaving 4 Tray in colander Edible Packaging to Enhance Product Offerings - Cook in a Bag Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 47Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  48. 48. Edible Packaging to Enhance Product Offerings - Shapes • Upscale frozen/fresh Surimi seafood • Impart texture • Lower fat content by reducing oil uptake • Bite size • Decrease product waste Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 48Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  49. 49. Edible Packaging to Enhance Product Offerings – Meal Kits • Keep water within separate foods with reduced synthetic packaging Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 49Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  50. 50. Edible Packaging to Enhance Product Offerings – Meal Kits • Reduce retailer labor and provide improved food safety Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 50Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  51. 51. Edible Moisture Barriers Recommendations-1 • Assess viability Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 51Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  52. 52. Edible Barriers Recommendations-2 • Water vapor barriers • Apply research and test based on direction of prior work • Develop proprietary solutions Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 52Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  53. 53. Value Chain is Needed to Meet Goals Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 53Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  54. 54. Value Chain Actions • Ensure Agility • Build Trust • Incent • Develop with partners Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 54Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  55. 55. Ensure Agility • Ensure agility in meeting need for package change • Because food industry processes are not aligned to implement packaging solutions, agility to work a different way is needed • Realign cost:benefit within value chain members • Development time and costs shared within value chain • Develop solutions jointly vs “serving up” solutions • Employ startup (mentality/physically) without internal/external barriers • Gain tacit knowledge • Identify core advisory team experts to guide team Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 55Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  56. 56. Build Trust Build Trust to increase shelf life: • Trust to enable shifting the role to a packaging responsibility is needed • Need to build trust that ___ can provide extra measure of food safety, or key attribute • Process transparency • Align goal with food safety HACCP, FSMA, GFSI, etc processes • Incorporate transparency to build tacit knowledge Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 56Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  57. 57. Perform Stress Test • To assess partner response • To align to improve functionality • Increased microbial load, product abused, seasonal variation in value chain • Explore viability of safety guarantee • Need to be involved with integration into HACCP, FSMA, GFSI, etc process and required post pack conditions Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 57Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  58. 58. Incorporate Incentives • Since food safety and reducing waste is normally the role of the food processor, incentives to enable shifting the role to packaging is needed • Need to provide incentives to work as a partner in food safety and waste reduction • Assess motivation for CPG to work on ___ • Timing • Reduce costs • Chance to truly innovate • Design reward system based on conversion process • Connect with retailer on needs/signage • Align rewards to conversion process • Design reward system based ___ process efficacy • Storage of ___ packaging material • Packing of product with packaging material Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 58Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  59. 59. Develop Core Competency with Partners • Develop core competency with partners in the value chain • Need to stretch value chain to incorporate more members • Researchers in ____ arena jointly funded-consortiums, foundations, universities • Assess distribution controls • Explore impact on retail if shelf life extended • Make consumer connections • Assess sustainability in holistic manner (reuse, regeneration, recycling, reduce) • Nutritional waste • Package waste Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 59Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017
  60. 60. Questions? Dr Claire Sand CEO, Packaging Technology & Research, LLC Adjunct Professor, Michigan State University Food science and packaging expertise: • Coaching • Consulting • Technology • Strategy www.PackagingTechnologyandResearch com Tactical Packaging Challenges & Solutions for Seafood 60Dr Claire Sand Winter 2017

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