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September 2022 Top Packaging Challenges-Getting It and Making It Count.pptx

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Top Packaging
Challenges:
Getting It and
Making It
Count
September 2022
Connect with me at 612-807-5341 or
claire@packagin...
risks to be more wholly determined.
Another way to manage and assess
risk isto perform stress tests within
the entire pack...
• Claire Sand is a Global Packaging Leader with 35+ years of broad
experience in the food and packaging science spectrum i...
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September 2022 Top Packaging Challenges-Getting It and Making It Count.pptx

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September 2022 Food Technology Magazine Article.
With 30 years of experience across the food science and packaging spectrum, Dr Claire Sand through her company, Packaging Technology & Research, offers clients solutions using Strategy, Technology, Consulting and Coaching. ​
 
Want to know more about how this article affect your business? Reach out to Dr Sand on Linked In - https://www.linkedin.com/in/clairekoelschsand
 
Want to keep learning from Dr. Sand? View more of her presentations and articles at https://www.packagingtechnologyandresearch.com/expertise.html
Dr. Claire Sand | Owner, Packaging Technology & Research, LLC; Adjunct Professor, Michigan State University; Columnist for Food Technology Magazine
http://www.packagingtechnologyandresearch.com/

September 2022 Food Technology Magazine Article.
With 30 years of experience across the food science and packaging spectrum, Dr Claire Sand through her company, Packaging Technology & Research, offers clients solutions using Strategy, Technology, Consulting and Coaching. ​
 
Want to know more about how this article affect your business? Reach out to Dr Sand on Linked In - https://www.linkedin.com/in/clairekoelschsand
 
Want to keep learning from Dr. Sand? View more of her presentations and articles at https://www.packagingtechnologyandresearch.com/expertise.html
Dr. Claire Sand | Owner, Packaging Technology & Research, LLC; Adjunct Professor, Michigan State University; Columnist for Food Technology Magazine
http://www.packagingtechnologyandresearch.com/

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September 2022 Top Packaging Challenges-Getting It and Making It Count.pptx

  1. 1. Top Packaging Challenges: Getting It and Making It Count September 2022 Connect with me at 612-807-5341 or claire@packagingtechnologyandresearch.com Dr Claire Sand’s article in IFT’s Food Technology Magazine
  2. 2. risks to be more wholly determined. Another way to manage and assess risk isto perform stress tests within the entire packaging supply chain. This defines nodes in the supply chain that are at risk. For exam- pie, the loss of an adhesive source may prevent required lamination processes and result in substitu tion to meet timelines. Planning for this substitution reduces risk. Increasingly, brands need to switch packaging materials and formats due to sourcing issues. Predicting shelflife and measuring shelflife in accelerated conditions, coupled with experiential knowl edge-benchmarking competitors' current product barriers, tempera ture, and humidity conditions and additional shelflife or product dif ferences-allows for more rapid switching. In addition, package parameters and a solid knowledge of the mode of product deteriora tion need to be known. Packaging barriers to water and oxygen are needed to defend against the four modes of deterioration-water vapor loss/gain, lipid oxidation, microbial growth, and brown ing-in addition to flavor loss. Package fraud also is a result of packaging procurement challenges. As with food fraud, econom- ics drive package fraud, which threatens a food package's pri mary function: to protect food. Fraudulent packaging can provide different migration rates, use of unapproved chemicals, and pro cessing aids, all of which can affect shelflife and seal integrity. Package fraud can be deterred by develop ing a chain of custody for packaging components, for which the eco nomics driving packaging fraud are high. For example, the substitu tion of virgin material for recycled or bioderived polymers happens when their prices exceed virgin polymers. Extra effort in con firming this supply minimizes the risk of package fraud occurring. F o rb r a n d s a n dretailers t om e e tr o o d w a s t e reduction targets, c o n s u m e r deriv edr o o d wa s t em u s t b ea d d r e s s e d W i l h p a c k a g i n g . Known or unknown (fraud ulent) switching of package materials also exposes another area-that of chemicals of con cern (COCs). Chemicals such as inks and coatings on paperboard can migrate into food, hampering recycling, reuse, and compost ing efforts. More than 10,000 chemicals are approved for direct food contact based on a defined condition of use. So, a pack- age suitable for food contact for one product type, such as hard candy, will not be acceptable for salad dressing. Packaging sup pliers supply information based on approved use. It is best prac tice to verify that migration is not an issue for each product, espe cially if the package source is new and the chain of custody is not tight. Food-simulating liquids measure migration when packag ing is in contact with the food. Package Development Delays Prototype and production tooling for new packaging are experienc ing longer wait times. However, product launch deadlines are often not extended. Instead, cre ative problem-solving, adopting refined expertise in developing package options, and commu nicating added risks are used to meet launch timelines. To meet R&D timelines, one solution is to employ a nonsequen tial research and development process. For example, R&D tri- als and factory acceptance tests (FATs) now provide the ability to assess numerous package options in a single trial versus allowing time to refine packaging between successive trials. This demands expertise in defining what options should be trialed versus relying on a sequence of trial results to fine tune and define all package options in a single trial. Managing the risk of a suboptimal option is criti- cal. To manage this, a phased-in approach is used to fine-tune packaging immediately after less than-perfect packaging at launch. Making It Count: Meeting Consumer Needs The rising cost of packaging and the increased cost of food means that packaging must work harder to add brand and consumer value and maintain food safety. Adding value with a packaging investment needs to connect in a meaningful way with consumers and retailers to drive sales and pay off on the invest ment. For example, front-of-house (FOH) packaging that extends the shelflife of food in a display case reduces out-of-stocks (OOS), the economic loss of food waste, and labor in rotating and checking on products. In this scenario, a pack aging solution needs to increase product shelflife for a meaning- ful amount of time. This varies by product and venue. A 20-minute extension is worthy of additional packaging investment for hamburg ers at a QSR but not for a fruit salad sold in a grocery store. With this time parameter firmly established by product type, packaging solutions that meet this need are developed and weighed against the econom- ics of OOS, food waste, and labor. Likewise, for retailers and brands, packaging has intense value if it resonates with con sumers. The process of price-pack architecture involves a rational conjoint analysis to define what package elements drive consumer purchase intent. Essentially, the connection between packaging investment and consumer needs is critical. In many cases, pack aging options are assessed before evaluating whether the solutions the options provide have mean ing to consumers. For example, in a recent survey, consumers ranked closure solutions and liked the flip top closure used by the cate gory leader best. However, when 78 Food Technology I September 2022
  3. 3. • Claire Sand is a Global Packaging Leader with 35+ years of broad experience in the food and packaging science spectrum in industry - from basic research to marketing - and in academia - tenured professor and director. • Sand's mission is to enable a more sustainable food system with science and value chain innovations that more sustainably increases food shelf life and prevents food waste. • She solves packaging and food industry challenges using a blend of packaging and food science and value-chain expertise. • Dr. Sand holds a PhD in Food Science and Nutrition from the University of Minnesota and MS and BS in Packaging from Michigan State University. Questions? Let’s Connect! Call 617-807-5341 or email claire@packagingtechnologyandresearch.com www.PackagingTechnologyandResearch.com

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