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Packaging technologies and value chain concepts to advance value-added pulse-based foods

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Topic: Packaging technologies and value chain concepts to advance value-added pulse-based foods
Speaker: Claire Koelsch Sand, LLC
Date: March 30th, 2017
More at https://www.mcgill.ca/desautels/mcche/events/convergent-innovation-webinar-series-pulse-program

Published in: Food
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Packaging technologies and value chain concepts to advance value-added pulse-based foods

  1. 1. Packaging technologies and value chain concepts to advance value-added pulse-based foods Dr Claire Sand Spring 2017
  2. 2. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 2
  3. 3. Packaging challenges from farm to fork MANUFACTURER • Reduce contamination during product fill • Assess initial microbial load • Reduce initial microbial load • Enable HACCP, etc • Address chilled worker conditions DISTRIBUTOR/ RETAILER • Enable stock rotation • Time &Temp monitoring system • Oxygen level monitoring system • Control temperature • Reduce microbial load at POS CONSUMER • Refrigerate to Freezer • Heat/Cook in Package • Enable safe package reuse • Reduce consumer contamin from repeat use • Expand time for safe product use • Enable freezer storage Dr Claire SandPackaging value chain for pulses 3
  4. 4. Overview Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses-key technologies Packaging value chain creates needed structure for pulse strategies to succeed Packaging Value Chain Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses-sustainability Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 4
  5. 5. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 5 Packaging value chain
  6. 6. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 6 raw materials for packaging converted packaging manufactured packaging components Combined product and package distributed product and package sold product and package discarded product and package Packaging Value Chain Interfaces The Circular Value Chain
  7. 7. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 7
  8. 8. Packaging evolves to a supply chain • During Industrialization the primary responsibility for the transport of good shifted from producer to the purchaser • Ford defined packaging • Packaging customized for different buyers Dr Claire Sand 8Packaging value chain for pulses
  9. 9. Packaging evolves to a supply chain 1950-1980s • Post war era saw efficiencies grow • Drucker coined the term, “knowledge worker” in 1973 • Energy crisis led to focus on bulk shipments & DCs which reduced energy costs associated with distribution • Global situations in operations Dr Claire Sand 9Packaging value chain for pulses
  10. 10. Packaging Supply Chain – 1980s • Mass production of packaging increased • Vertical integration internalized supply chains • External supply chains needed management process to deliver- • JIT • ECR 10Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand
  11. 11. Packaging Supply Chain – 1980s • Porter’s Model of Supply Chain Management in 1985 11Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand
  12. 12. Packaging Supply Chain – 1990s • Strategic Alliances • Price • Fueling innovation, cost savings, sustainability • Alliances stretch • From Packaging to retailers • BASF-Solvay joint venture • Commodization • POS information enabled continuous replenishment and then the supply of packaging was linked directly to sales • Essentially, once logistics were “figured out”, the focus on value became more relevant • Value began to be assessed down the supply chain Dr Claire Sand 12Packaging value chain for pulses
  13. 13. The concept of value • Value- • Has Context • Is experiential • Has a subjective nature • Occurs when needs are met Dr Claire Sand 13Packaging value chain for pulses
  14. 14. Value has context • The value of a quality of packaging varies with it context • In the late 1980s within the EU, sustainable packaging had value • During this same time in the US, sustainable packaging had little consumer resonance or value • Now, with the REACH initiatives and EN standards altering global markets, sustainability has value within developing and developed countries • The context changed Dr Claire Sand 14Packaging value chain for pulses
  15. 15. Value is experiential • Relationships between companies gain more traction if the companies experience value the same way • JL Clark and Farmaesthetics • Price based bidding when insisting on quality, time Dr Claire Sand 15Packaging value chain for pulses
  16. 16. Value has a subjective nature • Trust of partners in the packaging value chain aligns- • With inexperienced packaging professionals and organizations • When economic downturns cause disruption • When disaster management is needed Dr Claire Sand 16Packaging value chain for pulses
  17. 17. Value occurs when need are met • Needs within each link of the value chain are met • Retailer needs emerged as primary in 1990s • Post consumer needs are emerging as primary Dr Claire Sand 17Packaging value chain for pulses
  18. 18. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 18 raw materials for packaging converted packaging manufactured packaging components Combined product and package distributed product and package sold product and package discarded product and package Packaging Value Chain Interfaces The Circular Value Chain Value Chains seek sustainable competitive advantages from consumers to raw materials
  19. 19. Overview Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses-key technologies Packaging value chain creates needed structure for pulse strategies to succeed Packaging Value Chain Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses-sustainability Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 19
  20. 20. Packaging value chain creates needed structure for pulse strategies to succeed Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 20
  21. 21. Alignment is missing • Economic pressures • Global competitors • Food industry barriers Incentives Lack of trust/connection • New partners • Cost-benefits Relationships vary within the chain • Require different approaches • Are assessed based on the value the relationship has to the organization and within the entire value chain Dr Claire Sand 21 Value Chain creates structure in relationships Packaging value chain for pulses
  22. 22. Value Chain creates structure in relationships • A strong value chain is a competitive advantage because then the entities within the chain and the entire chain can focus on higher level goals such as innovation • When relationships within the value chain are based on value, the footing is more solid than price Dr Claire Sand 22Packaging value chain for pulses
  23. 23. Value Chain actions for pulses • Build Trust • Manage knowledge • Develop partners • Share work • Ensure Agility • Adjust to reward significance in relationships Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 23
  24. 24. Build Trust Build Trust to increase innovation in processing and packaging- • Trust to enable shifting the role to a packaging responsibility is needed • Need to build trust that ___ can provide extra measure of innovation, food safety • Process transparency • Align goal with food safety HACCP, FSMA, GFSI, etc processes • Incorporate transparency to build tacit knowledge Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 24
  25. 25. Build Trust-Manage knowledge Dr Claire Sand 25 • SCM has refined processes for logistics data • Knowledge not transferred • Knowledge implies an understanding of the value of the information • Supply chain disruptions due to disasters (economic and environmental) occur not because of a lack information • Data for distinct groups was available • Knowledge was missing Packaging value chain for pulses
  26. 26. Build Trust-Manage knowledge Dr Claire Sand 26 • Human knowledge • Seasoned packaging professionals • Education • Structured knowledge • Explicit rules, behaviors, and routines of who communicates with whom • Social knowledge • Tacit knowledge within and with value chain members… • 37% said they have a clear understanding of what their organization is trying to achieve and why • 20% said they had a clear "line of sight" between their tasks and their team's and organization's goals Packaging value chain for pulses
  27. 27. Build Trust-Refine functional relationships 27 • Functional relationships within the developing world can be reflective of what the industrial world needs as well • Example- Coffee in Kenya • Profits go to roaster after value added consumer packaging used by roaster • Role of packaging value chain is critical Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand
  28. 28. Build Trust-perform stress test • To assess partner response • To align to improve functionality • Increased microbial load, product abused, seasonal variation in value chain • Explore viability of safety guarantee • Need to be involved with integration into HACCP, FSMA, GFSI, etc process and required post pack conditions • Stress tests define flows of information and communication needed • By asking value chain members what would happen if ------ • We can best assess weaknesses in the value chain • We can define new communication processes needed for each situation Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 28
  29. 29. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 29
  30. 30. Develop partners and shared value • Need to stretch value chain to incorporate more members • Researchers in ____ arena jointly funded-consortiums, foundations, universities • Assess distribution controls • Explore impact on retail if shelf life extended • Make consumer connections • Assess sustainability in holistic manner (reuse, regeneration, recycling, reduce) • Nutritional waste • Package waste Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 30
  31. 31. Develop partners and shared value Dr Claire Sand 31 • Focus on what’s needed • Rapid deliveries • Address immediate needs • Altering priorities in distribution system from FIFO to when needed • Blogs-Informal communication when a new priority arises • Beyond Task Forces/Committees • Actionable objectives from customers • I wish we could reduce out of spec components… • I wish we had more trust in our supplier… • I wish they would help me optimize my retail space… Packaging value chain for pulses
  32. 32. 32 Shared value Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand
  33. 33. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 33
  34. 34. Develop partners and shared value Dr Claire Sand 34 • Shared value recognizes that externalities create internal costs for companies- • Higher energy costs (due to dwindling supplies) • Higher raw material costs (due to lack of reuse /recycling) • Need for more educated work fore • Commoditization • Price focused competition • Little innovation • Unclear competitive advantage • Profits coming at the expense of the community • Government policies attempt to internalize externalities such as the social costs of pollution • Business fight these initiatives and resist standards Packaging value chain for pulses
  35. 35. Develop partners and shared value Dr Claire Sand 35 • Packaging and pulses-regeneration, recycling and better technology all have shared value • Location is refined beyond labor costs as- • Human labor takes secondary role to robotics • New consumer markets • Clustering and now tierisation in automotive are mimicked in multicomponent packaging industry • Refined tierisation reaches inherent shared value of- • Making profit synergistically • Joint technology advances • Focus on specific customer/industry Packaging value chain for pulses
  36. 36. Develop partners and shared value-clusters Clusters on packaging motivated by the- • 5 trends • Shift from vertical integration to relying on outside suppliers, partners, and institutions • Increasing knowledge and skill intensity of competition • Globalization of markets and value chains • Nations and regions compete to attract specific business Dr Claire Sand 36Packaging value chain for pulses
  37. 37. Develop partners and shared value-clusters Dr Claire Sand 37 Clusters Increase Productivity / Efficiency • Efficient access to specialized inputs, services, employees, information, institutions, training • programs, and other “public goods” (local outsourcing) • Manage knowledge via coordination and transactions across firms • Rapid diffusion of best practices and tacit knowledge • Ongoing, visible performance comparisons and strong incentives to improve that align shared value Clusters Stimulate and Enable Innovations • Greater likelihood of perceiving meaningful innovation opportunities (e g , unmet needs, sophisticated customers, combinations of services or technologies) • Presence of multiple suppliers and institutions to assist in knowledge creation Packaging value chain for pulses
  38. 38. Develop partners and shared value-clusters Dr Claire Sand 38 Clusters Facilitate Commercialization and New Business Formation • Opportunities for new companies and lines of established business are more apparent • Spinoffs and startups are encouraged by the presence of other companies , commercial relationships, and concentrated demand • Commercializing new products and starting new companies is easier because of available skills, suppliers, etc Packaging value chain for pulses
  39. 39. Develop partners and shared value-clusters Dr Claire Sand 39Packaging value chain for pulses
  40. 40. Develop partners and shared value-clusters • Competitiveness must be a bottoms-up process in which many individuals, companies, and institutions take responsibility • Clusters provide a platform to address the specific barriers companies face • in a given market, not just general challenges all companies are exposed to Dr Claire Sand 40Packaging value chain for pulses
  41. 41. Develop partners and shared value-clusters Neutral across clusters • Enhancing productivity of multiple firms/institutions • Facilitating/capturing linkages and externalities • Facilitating the flow of information/knowledge across actors • Engaging the private sector, not just government • Preserving and enhancing market competition, not retarding it Dr Claire Sand 41Packaging value chain for pulses
  42. 42. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 42
  43. 43. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 43
  44. 44. Ensure Agility • Ensure agility in meeting need for package change • Because food industry processes are not aligned to implement packaging solutions, agility to work a different way is needed • Realign cost-benefit within value chain members • Development time and costs shared within value chain • Develop solutions jointly vs “serving up” solutions • Employ startup (mentality/physically) without internal/external barriers • Gain tacit knowledge • Identify core advisory team experts to guide team Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 44
  45. 45. Ensure Agility-VUCA • VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous) society demands agility in packaging • By focusing on each link’s value, packaging can uniquely offer this agility • Packaging’s various finished goods phases enable faster reaction time • Example – skin graft packaging & disaster mgmt • Packaging’s role is evolving within the value chain • Research on increasing responsiveness, core technologies (inks, tertiary packaging, labeling, GFSI, FSMA, REACH) have focused innovation on finished goods flexibility Dr Claire Sand 45Packaging value chain for pulses
  46. 46. Ensure Agility-Packaging for economic reshuffling • Packaging can enable affordable choices the 4 billion+ consumers at pyramid’s base • Packaging needs to technically leapfrog to provide product protection and a market • Packaging can facilitate manufacturing value added goods versus raw material exports • Reveals opportunity to use historically indigenous materials (e g , jute) • Research potential in facilitating leapfrogging in technology is high Dr Claire Sand 46Packaging value chain for pulses
  47. 47. Ensure Agility-Packaging for urbanization • Urban market is growing • About 2+ million people/month become urban dwellers in Asia • Urban households have 3 times more disposable income than rural • Packaging can meet this market need through research on focused urban needs • Example – optimization of aseptic pkg Dr Claire Sand 47Packaging value chain for pulses
  48. 48. Ensure Agility-Packaging for urbanization • Packaging can facilitate the distribution via alternative channels (versus traditional models) to meet urban needs • A future value chain defined by consumer led value will optimize packaging based on global urban and rural consumers • Example-Medical contract packaging & Anderson’s window walls & UHP • Optimal packaging technology focuses on post consumer disposal in urban areas (DSD) • Consumer specific packaging is growing • Kids design Legos and package • Packaging research on predictive restocking (beyond RFID) to make consumer and post consumer packaging seamless Dr Claire Sand 48Packaging value chain for pulses
  49. 49. Ensure Agility-Packaging resource management • The future value chain links the post consumer value of packaging with raw materials • This moderates research to focus on raw material production-the largest energy use in packaging • Packaging processes are being refined to use less water and energy • 28% of US consumers are LOHAS • Packaging’s role is unique due to the short use of the packaging • Packaging is also unique in that it is global since packages are made and disposed worldwide vs products being consumed or used as durable goods • Packaging research leads the way for regeneration of manufactured goods • Example-reusable packaging before reusable computers Dr Claire Sand 49Packaging value chain for pulses
  50. 50. Ensure Agility-Packaging resource management • Packaging’s role in the value chain can link raw materials with post consumer environment • Progress mirrors the future • Example –EU’s APEAL industry initiatives provide image of potential in packaging • Example-KLM • Example-Migros exceeded Switzerland’s PET recycling goal • Future role in value chain is collaborative • Global powerhouses (WWF, CERES, Forum for Future) are engaged Dr Claire Sand 50Packaging value chain for pulses
  51. 51. Ensure Agility-Packaging innovation for pulses Exploratory innovation within the value chain requires- • An open culture that can absorb new ideas and abandon the status quo • Ability to envisage a ‘new whole’ – and then work out how the various firms might work together in the future Dr Claire Sand 51 • Understanding that capabilities might shift along the chain • Value chain diagnostic systems to define exploration innovation challenges and develop appropriate performance measures Packaging value chain for pulses
  52. 52. Ensure Agility-Packaging innovation for pulses • Exploration closely links value chain entities with consumers to- • Tell ‘stories’ about the packages we use to explain- • Why it is used • How it was produced • Impact on the environment • Welfare of workers involved along the chain • Rewards accruing to the primary producers • Commodity packaging is- • Not able to compete on these issues • Disadvantaged in many premium market segments Dr Claire Sand 52Packaging value chain for pulses
  53. 53. Ensure Agility-Packaging innovation for pulses • Implementation of an exploratory platform for sustainability requires incentives to- • Absorb new ideas into organization • Reward ideas that address how challenges could be faced • Enable quick clearance for external entities • Reward long term innovation at the expense of short term innovation Dr Claire Sand 53 • Realign partners to achieve innovation • Reward new arrangements that focus on a long term innovation need • Reward concepts that offer opportunities to use value chain • Reward value chain teams that make steps toward implementation of new technology/initiative Packaging value chain for pulses
  54. 54. Ensure Agility-Packaging innovation for pulses • Enable the coordination shifting capabilities • Reward value chain partners to skip a link in the chain • Enable the use of loose contacts within and external to the chain • Reward internal system of cross functional learning that employs- • Bank of experts • University degrees/certifications in cross disciplinary areas • Reward knowledge transfer within organization and value chain • Define exploration innovation challenges and develop appropriate value chain diagnostic and performance measures • Reward coordination of incentives and goals Dr Claire Sand 54Packaging value chain for pulses
  55. 55. Ensure Agility–Align rewards • Since food safety and reducing waste is normally the role of the food processor, incentives to enable shifting the role to packaging is needed • Need to provide incentives to work as a partner in food safety and waste reduction • Assess motivation for CPG to work on ___ • Timing • Reduce costs • Chance to truly innovate • Design reward system based on conversion process • Connect with retailer on needs/signage • Align rewards to conversion process • Design reward system based ___ process efficacy • Storage of ___ packaging material • Packing of product with packaging material Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 55
  56. 56. Ensure Agility–Align rewards Dr Claire Sand 56 • Rewards connect to meeting specific values • Employees motivated by difference factors than companies • Value chain motivation often takes the form of- • Private Education for school age children funded • Tuition paid for college • Health care on site • Day care on site • Valued food solutions on site • Reduction in housing costs • Access to technology (cells, computers, internet Packaging value chain for pulses
  57. 57. Ensure Agility-Align rewards Dr Claire Sand 57 For example incentives to align supplier to Pepsi’s water initiative might take form of- 1. PET Bottle Supplier- • R&D employees – Pepsi rewards R&D employees for developing a new process for reduced water use at PET bottle blow molding facility • Production employees – Pepsi rewards PET bottle production employees for increased compliance with lower water use 2 Retailer- • DC employees rewarded for more optimal use of water in cleaning • Retailers rewarded for promoting recycling to consumers that will save water in oil extraction and resin conversion 3 Recyclers- • Employees rewarded when recycling of PET increases in community Packaging value chain for pulses
  58. 58. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 58
  59. 59. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 59
  60. 60. Packaging Value Chain Approach Managing for new approach requires the value chain to provide- • Shared business culture, vision, terminology and set of practices within the value chain • Ability to envisage how the parts add up across chain • Ability to change internal systems • Activities for the sake of the whole as a cooperative effort • Dense network of contacts and trust • Focus on team building activities Dr Claire Sand 60Packaging value chain for pulses
  61. 61. Overview Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses-key technologies Packaging value chain creates needed structure for pulse strategies to succeed Packaging Value Chain Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses-sustainability Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 61
  62. 62. Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses- sustainability Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 62
  63. 63. Packaging sustainability-Competitive advantage • Interviews from CEOs are telling-- • 98 % believe that sustainability issues will be critical to the future success of their business • 92 % believe that companies should integrate sustainability through their supply chain; only 59% believe that their company has done so • 51 % cite the complexity of implementation as the most significant barrier to embedding sustainability Dr Claire Sand 63Packaging value chain for pulses
  64. 64. Packaging & Sustainability-Packaging waste increases with income Dr Claire Sand 64Packaging value chain for pulses
  65. 65. Sustainability is seeking a favored option Dr Claire Sand 65Packaging value chain for pulses
  66. 66. Packaging & Sustainability-Companies react in different ways ► Dannon reduced packaging waste by eliminating the plastic cap over the peel-back foil seals on yogurt cups ► 3.6 million pounds of plastic/year ► Copied others in industry ► SunChips ► Compostable bag ► Limited compost facilities ► Noisy Dr Claire Sand 66Packaging value chain for pulses
  67. 67. Packaging LCAs Dr Claire Sand 67Packaging value chain for pulses
  68. 68. Measuring Package Sustainability 1. LCAs 2. COMPASS 3. Carbon Foot Print 4. Tesco and Wal-Mart Scorecards Dr Claire Sand 68Packaging value chain for pulses
  69. 69. Packaging & Sustainability-Steel Dr Claire Sand 69Packaging value chain for pulses
  70. 70. Packaging-LCA of Frozen and Canned Green Beans Dr Claire Sand 70Packaging value chain for pulses
  71. 71. Packaging & Sustainability-Value Chain derived redesign – Improved design is stackable, eliminates need for crates – Eliminates need to transport, return and wash crates – Can fit 224 jugs on a pallet instead of 180 – Reduces distribution costs by ~30% – Reduces price to consumers by ~$ 10 Dr Claire Sand 71Packaging value chain for pulses
  72. 72. ► Solve from Shared Value and value chain perspective ► Less packaging ► Less heat for processing ► Refrigeration ► Longer shelf life Dr Claire Sand 72 Packaging & Sustainability-Value Chain derived redesign Packaging value chain for pulses
  73. 73. • By straightening Hamburger Helper noodles- • Product could lie flatter in the box • Reduce the size of boxes • Supplier- saved nearly 900,000 pounds of paper fiber annually • Community- Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 11 percent, by taking 500 trucks off the road • Retail- increased the amount of product Wal-Mart shelves by 20 % Dr Claire Sand 73 Packaging & Sustainability-Value Chain derived redesign Packaging value chain for pulses
  74. 74. Packaging & Sustainability-Value Chain derived redesign Dr Claire Sand 74Packaging value chain for pulses
  75. 75. Packaging & Sustainability-Value Chain derived redesign • Minute Maid Mango Juice in Kenya- move from external source to internal sources for ingredients and package • Resulted in • Consistent quality mango supply for export and purchase by local bottlers • Doubled the income of 50,000 smallholder mango and passion fruit farmers (>50% women) in Kenya and Uganda • Need to stretch value chain to packaging and add further shared value by • Design for Recovery • Build recycling infrastructure Dr Claire Sand 75Packaging value chain for pulses
  76. 76. More shared value oriented and value chain sustainable solutions in Design for Recovery • Paper & film-air float separation • Steel-magnetic separation • Aluminum-Eddy currents • PE, PP, PET, PS- NIR and float density Use of Recycled or compostable plastics • rHDPE Envision • rPET Build Composting and Recycling Infrastructure Dr Claire Sand 76 Packaging & Sustainability-Value Chain derived redesign Packaging value chain for pulses
  77. 77. A packaging value chain stretches into the realm of shared value can achieve a higher degree of sustainability Dr Claire Sand 77 Roger’s Coffee Company • Coffee shared value- Growers and manufacturing coffee • Training, $, personal relationship, carbon-negative footprint • Packaging shared value- Materials now at 97% bio-based and compostable • Polymer source • New profits from bio-based materials and industrial & home composting • Opportunities to extend shared value- • Partnering with composters to add more industrial composting sites • Connect down the value chain is was done with coffee growers Packaging & Sustainability-Value Chain derived redesign Packaging value chain for pulses
  78. 78. Overview Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses-key technologies Packaging value chain creates needed structure for pulse strategies to succeed Packaging Value Chain Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses-sustainability Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 78
  79. 79. Connecting the packaging value chain to pulses-key technologies Edible and antimicrobial Active, intelligent, responsive Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 79
  80. 80. Causes/ Categories Category Z Category Y Category X Catgeory W Category V Category U Category T Category S Oxidation Moisture Change Microbial Browning Water resistance MVTR Antimicrobial Reduce impact of contamin. ingredients Reduce contamin. during product fill Assess initial microbial load Reduce initial microbial load Reduce cross contamin. Enable processing of some ingredients Enable HACCP Address chilled worker conditions Time &Temp monitoring system Oxygen level monitoring system Control tempertaure Measure microbial load at POS Enable safe package reuse Reduce consumer contamin. from repeat use Expand time for safe product use Enable oven/ MWmonitoring Address eating hygiene through packaging Enable freezer storage Packagingand Handling Pkg Prop. Product Degradation Causes Distributio n&Retail ConsumerUse Value Chain solutions to food safety are focused 80 Value Chain enables innovation through focus on societal issues – food safety Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand
  81. 81. Key technology-Edible packaging • Focus on • Reduce and not replace synthetic packaging • Freezer burn • Decreasing water loss in fresh seafood • Enhancing product offerings • Cook in bag • Shaped products • Meal kits to align with what retailers are doing Dr Claire SandPackaging value chain for pulses 81
  82. 82. Key technology-Edible packaging • Freezer burn • Interfacial water freezes and thaws and ice crystals grow crushing cells • Increased degradation within cells before they burst • Texture loss • Water loss • Loss from product • Loss from package is ($$$) loss Dr Claire SandPackaging value chain for pulses 82
  83. 83. Key technology-Edible packaging • Alternative to vacuum package • Edible barriers are a robust solution in consumer freezers • Many options and can be linked to antimicrobial barriers Dr Claire SandPackaging value chain for pulses 83
  84. 84. Key technology-Edible packaging Enable venting since product is better protected 1. Perforations • (horizontal or in a “patch”) that are coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through holes 2 Laser scored • top layer that is coated/laminated; but, to allow air/steam to escape through laser cuts that expand when heated • steam generated from within the package bursts through the scoring and automatically ventilates the package 3 Channels that vent air/steam through fin seal area • Consumer slit bag to vent before microwaving 4 Tray in colander Dr Claire SandPackaging value chain for pulses 84
  85. 85. Key technology-Edible packaging • Upscale frozen/fresh Surimi seafood • Impart texture • Lower fat content by reducing oil uptake • Bite size • Decrease product waste Dr Claire SandPackaging value chain for pulses 85
  86. 86. Key technology-Edible packaging • Keep water within separate foods with reduced synthetic packaging Dr Claire SandPackaging value chain for pulses 86
  87. 87. Key technology-Antimicrobial packaging Market need for Antimicrobial is increasing due to increase in- 1. Resistance of microbes to standard processing technologies 2. Food safety outbreaks • Foodborne disease reaches 30% of the population • Vibrio increased 115% since 2006 3. Need for controlled temperature conditions to inhibit microbial growth 4. Global food distribution in various stages of processing 5. Increase in consumer interest in fresh and multicomponent prepared meals 6. Inability of MAP/CAP technology to accommodate lack of controls in distribution, processing, product 7. Growing urban population in need of food they can not produce 8. High potential for cross contamination • Processing facilities often manufacturer more than one product • Distribution systems between products are often linked Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 87
  88. 88. Key technology-Antimicrobial packaging 1. FOOD PROCESSING CONDITIONS • Food pH, and stability after pH changes • Inactivation by food enzymes • Interaction with food additives/ingredients 2. FOOD SHELF LIFE FACTORS • Food storage temperature • Limited stability during food shelf life 3. MICROBIAL FACTORS • Microbial load • Microbial diversity and the target bacteria • Microbial interactions in the food system • Physiological stage (growing, resting, starving or viable) 4. BARRIERS • Protection by physico- chemical barriers (microcolonies, biofilms, slime) • Barriers enrobing Antimicrobials 5. DEVELOPMENT OF RESISTANCE/ADAPTATION • Predicted to be an issue of concern Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 88
  89. 89. Key technology-Antimicrobial packaging Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand within a structure as a coating through headspace 89
  90. 90. Key technology-Antimicrobial packaging ORGANIC ACIDS • Benzoic acid and benzoates • Sorbic acid and sorbates • Acetic acid • Propionic acids and propionates • Lysozyme SOME OTHERS • Chlorine dioxide • Triclosan • Silver zeolite, nitrate • Bacteriophages • Maillard reaction end products BACTERIOCINS • Nisin • Pediocin POLYMERS • Chitosan NATURAL EXTRACTS • Cinnamaldehyde • Eugenol • Allyl isothiocyanate • Green tea extract • Various extracts Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 90
  91. 91. Key technology-Intelligent packaging • Focus on- • TTI • Degradation sensors • No-Fraud assurance packaging • Responsive packaging Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 91
  92. 92. Key technology-Intelligent packaging- TTIs Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 92 • L5-8 Smart Seafood • irreversible color change from the hydrolysis of triglycerides • CoolVu • aluminum layer thins causing a reaction • FreshCode, Varcode andTempix, Tempix • fading barcodes • FreshMeter • turns from blue to gray via benzopyridine photoactivation
  93. 93. Key technology-intelligent degradation sensors Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 93 Degradation sensors are advancing rapidly • Direct connection to food deterioration • More sophisticated sensors that convert biochemical signals to electrical responses that show remaining shelf life from manufacturer to consumer
  94. 94. Key technology-Intelligent authenticity sensors Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 94
  95. 95. Intelligent packaging expands brand image potential Current solutions • Thermochromatic inks change color and reveal images when the product is at the proper temperature to eat or drink • NFC OpenSense package sensor is tapped with a smartphone • Polymark fluorescence based detection for sorting food- contact PET Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 95 Key technology-Intelligent authenticity sensors
  96. 96. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 96 Using the Packaging Value Chain for Pulses-checklist  Set goals  Assess market opportunity  Define what the product-package needs to do  Identify key social issues that are important  Align  Identify key partners to address these social issues and meet goals  Continue to expand issues to guide relationships within the Value Chain  Determine which Value Chain members align  Define value (context, experiential, subjective, meeting needs)  Build trust and agility into organizational frameworks so that new Value Chain initiatives are achievable Checklist-Bringing in your Innovations using the Packaging Value Chain
  97. 97. Packaging value chain for pulses Dr Claire Sand 97 Food science and packaging expertise- • Coaching • Consulting • Technology • Strategy www PackagingTechnologyandResearch com Dr Claire Sand CEO, Packaging Technology & Research, LLC Adjunct Professor, Michigan State University Packaging technologies and value chain concepts to advance value-added pulse-based foods

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