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Isean 2012 cbo training module on leadership & governance

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Isean 2012 cbo training module on leadership & governance

  1. 1. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 1 Capacity Building Series for Community-Based Organizations (CBO) Module 1: A Trainer’s Activity and Process Guide on How to Conduct a Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization Training Workshop May 2012
  2. 2. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 2 Developed by: Ruthy D. Libatique – Module Writer and Lead Facilitator Eden R. Divinagracia - Co-Facilitator For: ISEAN-Hivos-GF-R10-HIV/AIDS – “Strengthening community systems to reduce vulnerability to and impact of HIV infection on MSM and TG in Insular Southeast Asia” May 2012
  3. 3. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 3 Table of Contents Page Title Page 1 Purpose of the Module 4 How to Use the Module 5 Perspective Setting 6 The training design 8 Preparation/Preliminary Activities 14 The Module: A Trainer’s Activity and Process Guide on 16 How to Conduct a Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization Training Workshop Case Studies 35 Useful Tips for trainers 37 Training Tools and/or Handouts 38 References 39
  4. 4. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 4 Purpose of the Module The module “A Trainer’s Activity and Process Guide on How to Conduct a Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization Training Workshop” is the first in the Capacity Building Series for Community- Based Organizations. The module is to be used in assisting community-based organizations or CBOs to define what they are, put in order the organizational affairs such as the way they govern and operate, set their strategic and programmatic direction, identify the capacities they need to recruit, harness and/or improved on, and to the extent possible, professionalize their organizations so that they can engage the public or concerned population, policy and decision makers, donors or funders, and like or adversarial entities. Community-based organizations exist for a reason - be it for community service or action, health, social welfare, human rights, land rights, standing against stigma and discrimination and many other purposes. They can best articulate their causes and reap results when they are equipped with basic knowledge and skills on institutional governance, leadership and community mobilization. The Capacity Building Series for CBOs was developed for such purpose.
  5. 5. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 5 How to Use the Module The module is designed to be as simple and as direct as possible to enable relatively new trainers or facilitators to easily use it in conducting workshops for community-based organizations (CBOs), be they located in big or small cities, in capital towns and remote hamlets or be large or tiny associations. The overall training design assumes that the training starts in the morning. Therefore, it is up for the organizer/trainer/facilitator to make adjustments in the time frame set forth in this module, if the training happens to start after lunch. The module has both the content and activity process guide that flow in a logical sequence and described in a step-by-step manner. The module is structured on a per session basis that shows specific session objective, methodology, the tools that are needed, and the suggested time allotment. However, the time allotment will largely depend on the baseline level of knowledge and skills and the learning pace of the participants. The trainer or facilitator should therefore always be mindful of such factors.
  6. 6. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 6 Perspective Setting A community organization or community-based organization (CBO) is part of the non-profit sector that operates in a local community for a focused purpose or purposes – to provide social services at the local level. The word “community” may be defined in a geographic way, and/or in terms of the social, cultural or economic homogeneity of the members and the constituency for which its exists. Like many in the non-profit sector, the CBO runs on a voluntary basis and are often self-funded. Within many community organizations there are many variations in terms of size and organizational structure. 1 Some are formally incorporated, with a written constitution and a board of directors (also known as a committee), while others are much smaller and are more informal.2 More often than not, the situation of the CBOs of Men having sex with Men (MSM) and Transgender (TG) is that of sporadic, disorganized, informal, poor, struggling to put management systems, and without a clear strategic direction. The Board of Directors of most CBOs are more often than not, a working board since the organizations 1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_organization 2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_organization
  7. 7. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 7 small as they are cannot afford to retain full time staff. In this kind of a scenario, it is even more difficult to distinguish between the role of the Board and the role of the Secretariat often blurring the line between governance and management, diluting the principle of check and balance and may lead to a loss of sight of the organization’s strategic direction. This “Capacity Building Series for Community-Based Organizations” module was developed specifically to strengthen the ability of CBOs of Men having sex with Men (MSM) and Transgender (TG) to govern, lead, mobilize and set strategic and programmatic directions that will enable them to engage fully and meaningfully in MSM and TG issues and concerns, especially HIV and AIDS prevention, care and treatment, but not exclusively.
  8. 8. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 8 The Training Design Duration The training is designed to run for 730 minutes or approximately 12.20 training hours inclusive of coffee or tea breaks. The training can be done within 1.5 or 2 days. A fast-paced training can happen in 1.5 days. During the actual training, the facilitator may adjust the duration of individual topic/activity sessions in accordance with the pacing of the participants. Training Objective By the end of the training, the participants will have understood and appreciated the activities, process and skills needed to conduct training on institutional governance, leadership and community mobilization.
  9. 9. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 9 The Training Programme Design Day One Session Objective Topic & Activity Time Allotment Methods/Tools Locus of Responsibility  Set the tone of the training and encourage camaraderie and comfort among the participants.  Elicit the expectations of the participants of the training and alleviate anxieties. 1. Opening Activities Pre test Welcome Introductions Expectation Setting & Leveling 60 minutes (8:30 -9:10 AM) Interactive Session Organizer  Level the expectations of participants on the training and acquaint them on the training content, flow and processes.
 2. Perspective Setting & Overview of Training 
 30 minutes (9:10 – 9:20 AM)
 Input / LCD 
 Facilitator 

  10. 10. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 10  To assess the current status of the organization in terms of governance and leadership capacity through a self-assessment exercise. 3. “Know thyself” CBO Governance and Leadership Status Evaluation • Self Assessment on CBO Governance Status 45 minutes (9:35 – 10:15 AM) Processing and evocative conclusion Tool: Self Assessment CBO Governance & Leadership Forms Facilitator Coffee/Tea Break: 15 minutes (10:15–10:30 AM)  To enable the participants see the similarities and differences of their CBOs in terms of the level of governance and leadership 4. Plenary – sharing of outputs – Self- Assessment Results 45 minutes (10:30-11:10 AM) Completed self – assessment Participants  To concretize the participants’ appreciation of Organizational Governance in their own context. 5. Plenary – Concepts of Organization • Anatomy of a CBO (Environment/nature , Functions, Parts, Accountabilities and Governance)
 30 minutes (11:10 – 11:40 AM) • Input • Group Analysis of Self- Assessment on CBO Governance Results
 Facilitator Lunch Break: 60 minutes (12:00 – 1:00 PM) Energizer - 10 minutes  To concretize the 6. World Cafe 90 minutes completed CBO Facilitator
  11. 11. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 11 setting:  Group Analysis of CBO structures and practices on Leadership and Governance  Consolidation of Reports of Tables 1 and 2 (1:10 – 2: 40 PM) Self-Assessment on Leadership and Governance participants’ appreciation of Governance and Leadership in their own context.
 7: Plenary: Sharing of World Cafe Results 30 minutes (2:40 – 3:10 PM ) Facilitator Coffee/Tea Break: 15 minutes (3:10 – 3:25 PM)  To come to an agreement on the minimum governance standards of CBOs 8: Plenary: Agreement on a minimum “governance standards” mutually acceptable to the CBOs and ISEAN project 40 minutes (3:25 – 4:05 PM)  To provide a synthesis of Organizational Governance, Leadership and Community Mobilization. 9: Plenary: Open Forum/Discussion; Synthesis: Governance and Leadership 
 30 minutes (4:05 – 4:35 PM) 
 Facilitator 10: Day Ender 25 minutes
  12. 12. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 12 (4:35 – 5:00 PM) Day Two Session Objective Topic & Activity Time Allotment Methods/Tools Locus of Responsibility  To wake up the senses of the participants and get them ready for the day’s work. Activity 11: Warm Up Actvity and Review of the previous day’s proceedings 30 minutes (8:30 – 9:00 AM) • Group Dynamics Exercise • Participatory Recitation Participants  To enable the participants to acknowledge their CBOs weaknesses and appreciate the need for mentoring assistance to strengthen the organization. Activity 12: World Cafe: Strengthening my CBO: The need for Mentoring 60 minutes (9:00 – 10:00 AM) World Cafe Facilitator Coffee/Tea Break: 15 minutes (10:00 – 10:15 AM) Activity 13: Plenary: Sharing of Group Outputs 40 minutes (10:15 – 11:15 AM) o Activity 14: The Learning Contract 45 minutes (11:15 – 12:00 PM) SR and CBO
  13. 13. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 13 Lunch Break: 60 minutes (12:00 – 1:00 PM) Energizer: 15 minutes  To concretize participants’ learning on Institutional Governance by applying such in developing their respective CBO Governance Enhancement Action Plan. Activity 15: Developing the CBO Governance and Leadership Enhancement Plan (90 days timeline) 60 minutes (1:15 – 2:15 PM) CBO Governance Enhancement Plan Template (Small group by country or CBO As the case may be) Participants Coffee/Tea Break: 15 minutes (2:15 – 2:30 PM)  To determine the level of improvement achieved by the participants after the training.  To determine the level of satisfaction derived by the participants in the training.  To affirm the participants’ completion of the training and attest to the knowledge and skills they gained. Activity 16: Closing Acrivities Post Test Evaluation Distribution of Certificates 45 minutes (2:30 – 3:15 PM) • Post test forms • Evaluation forms or Participatory Evaluation Matrix • Certificates of Completion Organizer
  14. 14. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 14 Preparation for the Training Before the Actual training Logistics Requirement When organizing a training, seminar or workshop, it is best to look for a venue that will be conducive to the learning objective. Will the training need break out rooms aside from the main training hall? Is the ceiling high, just right or too low? Is the room well lighted and ventilated? What equipment will be needed? What about the food and accommodations? Think about the training supplies and materials that will be required, The physical comfort of the participants should be considered as physical comfort extends to the psychological and emotional comfort. All these contribute to or may well destroy the learning experience. Profiling of prospective training participants While a training may set a criteria for accepting participants beforehand, it is always good to profile prospective participants before the actual training or so that the facilitators can make certain modifications or adjust where it may be needed. (See Annex 1
  15. 15. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 15 During the actual training Physical arrangement in the venue The physical arrangement in the training room will depend on the number of participants, the nature of the training and the activities./tasks that the training will require. The seats may be arranged in a theater style, classroom style, circular, U-shape or a cluster of small tables. For this particular training, it is best to have a cluster of tables where small groups can do their assigned work. Pre test Administer Pre test among participants. This should be done immediately as the participants are registering. Make sure to collect the completed pre-tests as these will allow the trainers to gauge the progress of each participant from the succeeding learning process. (See Annex 2)
  16. 16. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 16 The Module: A Trainer’s Activity and Process Guide on How to Conduct a Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization Training Workshop Day One 1. Opening Activities • Welcome and Introductions • Small group work on “Getting to Know You” and Expectation Leveling and Setting • Group outputs presentation Tools: Attendance sheet and IDs; Metacards Time Allotted: 40 minutes Objectives: a. Set the tone of the training and encourage camaraderie and comfort among the participants. b. Elicit the expectations of the participants of the training and alleviate anxieties. Methodology: Interactive Group Session The Opening Activities set the tone and ambiance of the training. At the onset, the trainers and facilitators should strive for a welcoming and lively atmosphere. Since this is training for community- based organizations, an informal environment is recommended to avoid a threatening atmosphere and encourage optimum participation. The organizing association should handle the welcome and introductions as well as the leveling of expectations. In the interest of time, the introductions and leveling of expectations can be done as one participative activity. 10. Introductions/”Getting to know you”:
  17. 17. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 17 Day One 1. Opening Activities Step 1. Divide the trainees into four (4) groups by asking each to count off from 1 to 4. Group together all number ones, all number twos, all number threes and all number fours. It does not matter if the number of members within each group varies. Step 2: Ask each group to introduce themselves to each other within the group as to name, organization and geographic origin, whether in a relationship (optional) and what is one thing that he/she would like to do/accomplish so ardently. Step 3: Let the members within each group share their knowledge of each other. Ask the groups to introduce their members during the group presentation. Leveling of Expectation Step 1: Ask each group to discuss their group expectation on their assigned item (Content, Process, Facilitation and Participants) and to write their expectation in the metacards provided. Only ONE thought per metacard. Step 2. Consolidate all outputs per group; Post the metacards on a manila paper. 10. Group Presentation Let each group present their outputs (introductions of their respective members and the group’s expectations)
  18. 18. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 18 Day One 2. Perspective Setting and Overview of Training Processing of group outputs on expectation setting with a segue clarifications on the workshop programme and flow. Tools: Expectations Metacards, power point on programme flow Time Allotted: 10 minutes Objective: Level the expectations of participants on the training and acquaint them on the training content, flow and processes. Methodology: Interactive Processing Session Step 1: Process the outputs on the expectations and use this as the springboard for setting the perspective of the training and laying down its content and flow. Step 2: Discuss the training programme. Step 3: Entertain questions from the participants Day One Note to the Facilitator: The Six Thinking Hats (created by Edward de Bono) Six Thinking Hats is a good technique for looking at the effects of a decision from a number of different points of view. It allows necessary emotion and skepticism to be brought into what would otherwise be purely rational decisions. It opens up the opportunity for creativity within Decision Making. The technique also helps,
  19. 19. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 19 for example, persistently pessimistic people to be positive and creative. Plans developed using the ‘6 Thinking Hats’ technique will be sounder and more resilient than would otherwise be the case. It may also help you to avoid public relations mistakes, and spot good reasons not to follow a course of action before you have committed to it. How to Use the Tool: You can use Six Thinking Hats in meetings or on your own. In meetings it has the benefit of blocking the confrontations that happen when people with different thinking styles discuss the same problem. Each ‘Thinking Hat’ is a different style of thinking. These are explained below: • White Hat: With this thinking hat you focus on the data available. Look at the information you have, and see what you can learn from it. Look for gaps in your knowledge, and either try to fill them or take account of them. • This is where you analyze past trends, and try to extrapolate from historical data. • Red Hat: ‘Wearing’ the red hat, you look at problems using intuition, gut reaction, and emotion. Also try to think how other people will react emotionally. Try to understand the responses of people who do not fully know your reasoning. • Black Hat: Using black hat thinking, look at all the bad points of the decision. Look at it cautiously and defensively. Try to see why it might not work. This is important because it highlights the weak points in a plan. It allows you to eliminate them, alter them, or prepare contingency plans to counter them.
  20. 20. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 20 • Black Hat thinking helps to make your plans ‘tougher’ and more resilient. It can also help you to spot fatal flaws and risks before you embark on a course of action. Black Hat thinking is one of the real benefits of this technique, as many successful people get so used to thinking positively that often they cannot see problems in advance. This leaves them under-prepared for difficulties. • Yellow Hat: The yellow hat helps you to think positively. It is the optimistic viewpoint that helps you to see all the benefits of the decision and the value in it. Yellow Hat thinking helps you to keep going when everything looks gloomy and difficult. • Green Hat: The Green Hat stands for creativity. This is where you can develop creative solutions to a problem. It is a freewheeling way of thinking, in which there is little criticism of ideas. • Blue Hat: The Blue Hat stands for process control. This is the hat worn by people chairing meetings. When running into difficulties because ideas are running dry, they may direct activity into Green Hat thinking. When contingency plans are needed, they will ask for Black Hat thinking, etc. 3. “Know thyself”: Governance and Leadership Status Self Assessment Tools: 1. CBO Self-Assessment on Governance Form (See Annex 4) Time Allotted: 60 minutes Objective: To assess the current status of the organization in terms of governance and leadership capacity through a self-assessment exercise. Methodology: Small Group Work Step 1: Group the participants by CBO as the case may be
  21. 21. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 21 Step 2: Distribute the Self-Assessment Forms Step 3: Explain the instructions on the forms and let them accomplish the self- assessment. Complete the task. 4. Plenary – Sharing of outputs – Self-Assessment Results Time Allotted: 45 minutes Key Learning Points: The exercises allow the participants to look at their organization in an objective and comprehensive way- in terms of whether their organization is at par with the standards of a viable and/or sustainable organization. The result of the self-assessme nts, whether good or lacking serve as an eye opener to the participants and are supposed to spur their interest to improve on the current status of the organization.
  22. 22. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 22 The result of the self-assessments will be the reference for the succeeding learning exercises not only for this particular module, but also for the Strategic Planning module. Day One 10. Plenary – Input on Concepts of Organization Tools: • Powerpoint Presentation Time Allotted: 15 minutes • Give a brief input on “Anatomy of a CBO” (Environment/nature, Functions, Parts, Accountabilities and Governance) Use the power point presentation.
 Note to the Facilitator: The World Cafe3 as a discussion tool Time Allotted: 15 minutes The “World Cafe” is a method which allows participants to explore an issue in a small table groups of 5 to 7 people. It is a creative process set in a cafe’ setting or in a rook with tables enough to sit 5 yo 7 people. The cafe’ ambiance gives an informal and friendly atmosphere, thus the participants can openly discuss ideas in an non-threatening environment. How to conduct the World Cafe: • Facilitator puts on manila/kraft paper the questions to be tackled by one group during the World Cafe, The questions should address the issues relevant to the training or workshop. Limit the questions to only 2 per table. • Group the participants into 5 to 7 people. Note that there can be more than 2 groups 3 by Juanita Brown and David Isaacs
  23. 23. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 23 depending on the number of participants. Let them sit around a small table. The table is covered by manila/kraft paper. Each participant is given a marker or pentel pen. • The group selects a host from among them. The host acts as the moderator, but should not monopolize the conversation. • Each participant should be able to express his or her opinions or solutions. Participants are encouraged to doodle, draw, or write their thoughts on the spread paper. • After 30 minutes, the host can wrap up or summarize the conversation. • The groups exchange tables- Group 1 moves to Group 2 and vice verza. The host of each group remains to provide the summary and continuation of the dialogue. 10. World Cafe Setting: Governance and Leadership Gap/Need Analysis • Group Analysis of Self-Assessment on CBO Governance and Leadership 
 Time Allotted: 90 minutes Objective: To concretize the participants’ appreciation of Organizational Governance in their own context. Methodologies: • World Cafe Tool Step 1: Divide the participants groups of 5 to 7 people- ensuring that participants from one CBO are distributed among the groups. A facilitator will serve as the Host in each table. Step 2: Let the groups settle in their work tables and provide them with manila/kraft paper and markers of assorted colors. Step 3: Provide the groups with the following trigger questions: First Group: • What are the top 3 governance requisites (basic requirements for an organization to function) that your organization have? • What challenges are facing your organization in regard to governance?
  24. 24. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 24 Second Group: • What are the top 3 governance requisites that your organization does not have? • What activities/strategies will you do or can do to improve your organization’s governance? If there are more than 2 groups, the same questions will be asked in more than one table. Allow 30 minutes for each round of discussion per table(s) making sure that everyone participates. Then let the groups move to the other’s table(s) but the hosts remain in their assigned table. By the time the World Cafe ends, each group will have discussed the questions posed at each table. Step 4: Let a smaller working team consolidate the results of the discussions from both tables by answering this guide question: • What are the essential minimum requirements that an organization must have in order to become viable? Let the participants elect the reporter of the output among themselves. 7. Plenary: Sharing of Outputs Time Allotted: 30 minutes The reporter shares the consolidated report of the groups. 8: Plenary: Agreement on a minimum “governance standards” mutually acceptable to the CBOs and ISEAN project Time Allotted: 40 minutes • The facilitator presides over the discussion on the minimum governance standards (necessary features or characteristics of the organization that must be present in order for it to effectively and efficiently function) that should be expected of the community-based organizations so that they can be said to be viable or qualified to receive assistance from the ISEAN-Hivos project. • The discussion should end with a mutually agreed checklist of acceptable governance
  25. 25. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 25 standards from the CBOs, the Sub-recipient (SR) and the Principal Recipient (PR). 9: Plenary: Open Forum/Discussion; Synthesis: Governance and Leadership Time Allotted: 30 minutes Summarize the key learning points using the results of the discussions that ensued throughout the course of the day’s sessions. 10. Day Ender : Time Allotted: 25 minutes Ask participants to give their insights, impression or learning from the day’s activities. Key Learning Points: An organization is made up of a group of people who come together to accomplish a common goal or a set of goals. The size of an organization can vary from two people to thousands of people.4 People who have a common aim (which, usually is to bring about change), form organizations. 4 Chechetto-Salles,, Marta and Geyer, Yvette. Community-Based Organisation Management, Handbook series for community-based organisations. 2006. p.2
  26. 26. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 26 An organization should have a Vision for what it wants to aspire or become An organization should have a defined Mission (the organization’s reason for existence) The nature of the organization depends upon its vision and mission The members of an organization should have shared beliefs and values An organization should be dynamic – adapt to the changing times and trends without losing sight of its Vision and Mission A viable organization should build, maintain and sustain three (3) core capacities:  Leadership and Governance - with competent, committed Board; clear roles and functions for both Board, management and staff; clear organizational and programmatic goals, formalized policies and procedures
  27. 27. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 27  Technical and adaptive - should have an understanding of issues and environment, with a strategic plan, with an evaluation and performance measurement plan, community presence and involvement  Management - sound financial , program and human resource (including volunteers) management, with an operational plan, and organizational and decision-making processes in place. A viable organization is conscious of and honors its accountabilities to its constituency and supporters. Leadership means doing the right things. Management means doing things right. Poorly-run boards give rise to unaccountable practices, non-transparency, and poor communications with workers, clients, the public and funding agencies.5 Ineffective governance imposes a level of dysfunction upon an organization and can eventually lead to organizational failure. 5 Social Services: A Guide to Non Profit Governance. CUPE National Research Branch. p 7
  28. 28. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 28 Governance or Stewardship (i.e. the way organizations function) may be defined as “the overall processes and structures used to direct and manage an organization’s operations and activities”.6 Governance is the domain of the board of directors, which, in the non-profit sector, is comprised of volunteers. It has been said that proper governance requires the board to “stand outside the organization and hold it accountable to the public interest”.7 The “public interest” may include any of the following: client population, workers, volunteers, members, funding agencies, and the general public.8 Boards should operate in an accountable and ethical manner The board develops policies to provide direction and guidance to the organization. It is responsible for:  Developing a mission statement that reflects the vision and provides direction 6 Panel on Accountability and Governance in the Voluntary Sector (February 1999). “Building on Strength: Improving Governance and Accountability in Canada’s Voluntary Sector.” Available online at http://www.vsr-trsb.net/pagvs/ 7 Alliance for Non-profit Management, “What is the Role of Governance?” Available online at http://www.allianceonline.org 8 Ibid
  29. 29. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 29  The agency’s financial health including annual budget approval  Proper human resources  Ensuring legal requirements are followed  Ensuring the Bylaws are followed  Ensuring Board effectiveness  Administration  Establishment of committees to undertake financial, personnel, fundraising and planning functions  Effective community relations and communications  Hiring the executive director To be able to lead well, individual board members are responsible for:  Understanding the organization’s mission and mandate;  Knowing the board’s role and functions  Knowing the board’s legal obligations and ensuring that they are followed  Understanding financial and budget matters Community Mobilization is an approach in which the communities themselves lead and determine the nature of their response to a shared concern and where members within that community taking responsibility and are active in shaping plans and taking action.9 9 Definition by the International HIV/AIDS Alliance
  30. 30. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 30 Day Two Activity 11: Warm Up Activity and review of the previous day’s proceedings Time Allotted: 25 minutes Objective: a. To wake up the senses of the participants and get them ready for the day’s work. b. To enable the participants recall the previous day’s learning and connect the succeeding activities with these. Methodology: Group Dynamics Exercise (Cabbage Game/ Participatory Recitation) Step 1: Make a “cabbage ball” out of pieces of bond or craft paper. In each paper, which represents a cabbage leaf, is written a review question about the previous day’s lessons. (The questions are prepared beforehand). Step 2. Let the participants form a circle. Pass the “cabbage ball” in time with fast/lively music. Every time, the music stops, the participant who has the ”cabbage” peels off a leaf and reads aloud the question written on it. The participant answers the question. Praise the participant for clear and correct answers. Elucidate/clarify or provide the correct answer in cases when the participant fails to give the right answer. Day Two Activity 12: World Cafe: Strengthening my CBO: The need for Mentoring Time Allotted: 60 minutes Objective: To concretize the participants’ appreciation of mentoring as a need to strengthen their Organizational Governance.
  31. 31. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 31 Methodology: • World Cafe Tool Step 1: Divide the participants groups of 5 to 7 people- ensuring that participants from one CBO are distributed among the groups. A facilitator will serve as the Host in each table. Step 2: Let the groups settle in their work tables and provide them with manila/kraft paper and markers of assorted colors. Step 3: Provide the groups with the following trigger questions: First Group: • What are Your Goals in Working with a Mentor? Setting realistic goals; milestones • How do you work with your Mentor? Second Group: • In what specific aspects of organizational governance will your CBO need mentoring? • What Can You Do to Be an Effective Mentee? Step 4: Let a smaller working team consolidate the results of the discussions from both tables by answering these guide questions: • What are the scope of work of the mentor? • What are the obligations of the mentee? • How should the mentor and mentee work together to strengthen the CBO? Let the participants elect the reporter of the output among themselves. Activity 13: Plenary – Sharing of World Cafe Outputs Time Allotted: 40 minutes The reporter shares the consolidated report of the groups.
  32. 32. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 32 Activity 14: Learning Contract between Mentor and Mentee (TOR-roles of mentor and mentee) Time Allotted: 45 minutes Using the consolidated report of the previous session as the reference, let the participants (SR and CBO) come up with the salient points of the “Learning Contract” between the mentor and mentee. Day Two Activity 15: Developing the CBO Governance and Leadership Enhancement Plan (90 days timeline Developing the CBO Governance Enhancement Plan (90 days) Tool: CBO Governance Enhancement Plan Template (See Annex 5) Time Allotted: 60 minutes Objective: To concretize participants’ learning on Institutional Governance by applying such in developing their respective CBO Governance Enhancement Action Plan. Methodology: Small group work by country or CBO as the case may be Ask each group to create their own symbol or logo.
  33. 33. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 33 Day Two Activity 16: Closing Activities Post Test Evaluation Distribution of Certificates Time Allotted: 40 minutes Participatory Evaluation Matrix Content Process Participant Facilitation Total Total Objective: To determine the level of satisfaction derived by the participants in the training. Methodology: Participatory Evaluation Step 1: Make equal number of “emoticons” of smileys, (one with wide smile, and another slight smile) and a frowneys in as many as many as there are particlpants.
  34. 34. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 34 Step 2: Make a matrix on the board or on a manila paper showing the aspects of the training for evaluation- Content, Process, Facilitation and Participants. Post the matrix in a private area of the hall/room. Step 3: Ask the participants to privately post on the matrix the emoticon that convey their evaluation of each aspect of the training. Explain further that under the “participant” column, the one they will be evaluating is their own performance during the training. Step 4: After all participants have posted their emoticons, consolidate the results and show it to them. Then ask each one for feedback. Closing Activities Tools: • Certificates • Closing Program
  35. 35. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 35 Case Studies Example from the Phiippines This community based organization of MSM had its early beginnings in 2008. Organized to support and defend the cause of MSM and to advocate for the sexual health and human rights of the community. It has a total of 24 members, 16 of which are active while eight (8) are inactive. The CBO thrive on personal contributions of members as well as donations from friends and supporters such as the City and Provincial Health Offices where they belong. Most of the members are professionals and are employed while the officers / leaders are well-known in the area since they hold high positions in the government. The organization is supported by an NGO with national coverage. The support included assigning one (1) program coordinator as well as the use of office and all its facilities. As recipient of Global Funds project, the members of the organization were trained as peer educators and outreach workers for the prevention of STI/HIV/AIDS and eventually the group earned a reputation in the city that they are good advocates. The organization is now being tapped to conduct lectures in schools / universities and in organizing health events such as the World AIDS Day and AIDS Candlelight Memorial. The CBO also holds regular Friday session / meeting among MSM and they discuss various topics such as HIV/AIDS and LGBT rights. In 2011, the group decided to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission, a government organization that registers NGO and private organizations in the country. They complied with all the government requirements for registration. In 2012, the logistics and manpower support from the national NGO was stopped due to the lack of funding of the said national NGO. The assigned program coordinator is no longer employed but works as volunteer and the residence of the volunteer is now
  36. 36. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 36 being used as temporary office of the organization. The CBO requested a seat / place in the City Health Office or at the Provincial Capitol Building to conduct their peer education and one-on-one counseling. This request garnered favorable response from both government agencies (the City Health Office and the Provincial Health Office). In addition to the place being requested, the two (2) agencies already committed to provide table and chairs for the CBO space. (by Mariluz Tejares) Example from Malaysia Mynetra was formed as the Malaysian Network of Transgenders as a result of a networking workshop organised by PT Foundation and Seksualiti Merdeka in 2010. The participants came from all over Malaysia and recognised the benefits of formalising the connections made at the workshop and there fore set up a closed Facebook Group to stay connected and continue the discussions started at the workshop. From there it has grown to a ground of 1400 members spread throughout Malaysian who use this social media platform to discuss all types of issues that affect the transgender community in Malaysia as well as providing a platform for them to network and share learnings, business ideas and contacts. Currently there are 5 administrators and the group has successfully organised an empower workshop in Kuala Lumpur in April 2012 called Trace workshop. It was attended by 35 participants representing Transgender groups from all over Malaysia. Funding was successfully sourced from UN and International HIV/AIDS Alliance. Given the political and other environmental factors in Malaysia the group will find it difficult to register as an NGO or Foundation in Malaysia but are determined to continue their development and activities both on and offline. MyNetra is also well connected to other NGOs and networks in Malaysia and Internationally with members in the CCM and on the board of APTN (Asia Pacific Transgender Network).
  37. 37. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 37 Useful Tips for trainers  Always ascertain session “climate”. Check whether all participants understand what is being discussed periodically.  Always allow time for questions and clarification from the participants.  Traffic the discussion. Ensure that everyone’s participation in the sessions. Watch out for monopolisers. Encourage the silent and shy participants to share their thoughts  Ensure that materials and supplies needed in every session is available nearby  Always make a synthesis of the discussions  Ensure that the succeeding session connects/bridges to the preceding session
  38. 38. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 38 Training Tools and/or Handouts 1. Participants’ Profile Form 2. Pre/Post-Training Assessment 3. Pre/Post Test Key 4. CBO Self-Assessment on Governance Form 5. CBO Governance Enhancement Plan Template
  39. 39. revised Module 1:Leadership, Governance & Community Mobilization /rdlibatique.hivos 39 References Alliance for Non-profit Management, “What is the Role of Governance?” Available online at http://www.allianceonline.org Chechetto-Salles,, Marta and Geyer, Yvette. Community-Based Organisation Management, Handbook series for community-based organisations. 2006. Panel on Accountability and Governance in the Voluntary Sector (February 1999). “Building on Strength: Improving Governance and Accountability in Canada’s Voluntary Sector.” Available online at http://www.vsr-trsb.net/pagvs/ Social Services: A Guide to Non Profit Governance. CUPE National Research Branch Supporting the HIV Response A Manual for Civil Society Organizations, Module 6: Mobilizing for Most at Risk Populations. SUM Project USAID. June 2011 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_organization; accessed April 29, 2012 http://www.buzzle.com/articles/effective-leadership-skills.html (accessed April 29, 2012) http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/9-3-2004-58861.asp (accessed April 29, 2012) http://ezinearticles.com/?Three-Options-for-Non-Profit-Board-Governance&id=6341920 (accessed April 30, 2012

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