Session 1-35 May 2010<br />
Definitions<br />Attrition:  Change in the numbers, skills, ands competencies in the workforce due to, for example,  retir...
Why Is Knowledge Loss A Key Workforce Challenge We Are Facing?<br />Loss of knowledge -- and people with the<br />	knowled...
What Impact Will Changing Workforce Demographics have on your organization in the next 3-5 years?<br />None<br />1%<br />U...
Knowledge<br />Experience<br />Seniors<br />Middle Managers <br />Juniors<br />People Have Always Transitioned and Left Wi...
One View of KnowledgeFundamental and Underlying Concept<br />6<br />
High Performing, Knowledge Enabled<br /> Organizations<br />Sustaining a High Performing Knowledge, Enabled Organization <...
Operationalizing Learning©<br />Aligning Process, Execution, and Training <br />to <br />Improve Knowledge Retention and R...
Operating faster than the “speed of change” -- new or revised processes meet the rapid pace of change
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KM Gov: Managing Risk of Knowledge Loss Due to Workforce Turnover -- Introductory Comments

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KM Gov: Managing Risk of Knowledge Loss Due to Workforce Turnover -- Introductory Comments

  1. 1. Session 1-35 May 2010<br />
  2. 2. Definitions<br />Attrition: Change in the numbers, skills, ands competencies in the workforce due to, for example, retirement, promotion, transfer, and career changes within leadership and workforce<br />Critical Knowledge: Knowledge that is fundamental to the business or operational processes of the organization that supports mission delivery and mission success<br />2<br />
  3. 3. Why Is Knowledge Loss A Key Workforce Challenge We Are Facing?<br />Loss of knowledge -- and people with the<br /> knowledge -- between agencies and <br />those leaving government is increasing<br />Within government agencies, no integrated process or framework to capture and reuse the workforce’s relevant information, experience, and insight on a consistent and disciplined basis<br />Complicating factors: <br /> increasing size and complexity of workload<br /> decline in number of professionals in critical workforce subject areas<br />It exists at the leadership level and at the workforce level – it’s multi-generational and still not a priority for most organizations<br />3<br />
  4. 4. What Impact Will Changing Workforce Demographics have on your organization in the next 3-5 years?<br />None<br />1%<br />Unsure<br />2%<br />Slight<br />16%<br />Significant<br />43%<br />Moderate<br />38%<br />Source: ASTD/IBM Learning & Changing Workforce Demographics Study<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Knowledge<br />Experience<br />Seniors<br />Middle Managers <br />Juniors<br />People Have Always Transitioned and Left With Their Knowledge <br />Moving from Actual to Desired<br />What’s different about this now and why should we care?<br />We have a “workforce gap” – knowledge required by the workforce is inversely proportional to the age of the workforce – getting better but still a challenge to “move” the knowledge<br />Example  Acquisition Workforce: <br />The average age of the acquisition profession according to a recent NCMA survey is 47 years old<br />There is competition for the remaining scarce resources among many agencies and the private sector<br />We need a deliberate means for learning, capture and transfer of the “experience” of procurement – the “know how” and “know why” of procurement<br />Actual<br />Knowledge Transfer<br />Knowledge Transfer<br />Desired<br />5<br />
  6. 6. One View of KnowledgeFundamental and Underlying Concept<br />6<br />
  7. 7. High Performing, Knowledge Enabled<br /> Organizations<br />Sustaining a High Performing Knowledge, Enabled Organization <br />7<br />
  8. 8. Operationalizing Learning©<br />Aligning Process, Execution, and Training <br />to <br />Improve Knowledge Retention and Reuse<br />Adapt Learned Lessons and Create Sustainable, Effective Practices<br />Integrate<br /> New Learning<br />Capture New Learnings<br />Training<br />Learning After Doing<br />Improved Training<br />from New Learning<br />Adapt Training<br /> to New Learning<br />Capture New Learnings<br />Activity/Process<br />Learning After Doing<br />Codify Activity/Process<br />Document and Evolve Process as it is Executed<br />Evolve and Store Process Knowledge and Experience<br />Continuous application of “what we know and are learning” to “what we do”<br />© 2010 Working Knowledge CSP <br />Value of Approach<br /><ul><li>Continuous performance improvement over the course of performing the activity/process
  9. 9. Operating faster than the “speed of change” -- new or revised processes meet the rapid pace of change
  10. 10. Accelerates the ability to develop and implement processes that are part of business operations
  11. 11. Documents, describes, and validates the process and institutionalizes the approach
  12. 12. Aligns practice execution with training – what we “know how to do” with “teaching how to do it”</li></ul>8<br />
  13. 13. Project Summary<br />Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) <br />Hazards U.S. Multi-Hazard (HAZUS-MH) Program (2009 - ongoing)<br />HAZUS-MH is a nationally applicable standardized methodology that estimates potential losses from earthquakes, hurricane winds, and floods. HAZUS-MH produces loss estimates based on state-of-the-art scientific and engineering knowledge and software architecture (models) essential for decision-making at all levels of government and are a basis for developing mitigation plans and policies, emergency preparedness, and response and recovery planning at the federal, state, and local levels. This project is delivering a sustainable KM framework including a robust and sustainable community of practice network linking federal, state, and local users, subject matter experts, and HAZUS-MH practitioners to:<br /><ul><li>Categorize, centrally store, and make electronically accessible relevant HAZUS information created and collected over its performance history
  14. 14. Update and further develop process maps (create a model development baseline) of the HAZUS modeling process
  15. 15. Leverage (capture, transfer, and make readily available for reuse) experience and insight from those who not only build HAZUS-MH models, but also who use those models anywhere in the US so that:
  16. 16. Model development can be improved
  17. 17. Decision-making and mitigation planning from model application and use at all levels of </li></ul>government can be improved<br /><ul><li> Recovery from natural disasters using HAZUS models beyond the standard application of </li></ul>planning and estimating can be improved.<br />9<br />

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