Language Educators: Shaping the Future in a New Era!

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Slides from Marty Abbott\'s keynote address at the October 2008 Michigan World Language Association Annual Conference.

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  • We have created a Universal LifeMatrix segmentation, based on Values, LifeStyle and Lifestage that differentiates consumers for product usage, brands and media.The ten segments are:Tribe Wired: Are digitally oriented, big users of technology, they are fun-seeking creative young singlesFun/Atics: Are aspirational and free-spirited active young people. Dynamic Duos: Are an interesting group. They hard-driving, high-income married couples focused on their careers. They are the most affluent of all LifeMatrix segments.Priority Parents: This group is family focused. The live their lives for their children and their spouses. Children have great deal of influence in the products used by this group and in the media they consume. Not surprisingly, this group is more likely to have young children in the house.Home Soldiers: Home Soldiers are home-centric, the are family-oriented individuals with very strong aspirational values. They live their lives vicariously, they are very interested in watching extreme sports but unlikely to ever do it themselves.Renaissance Women: This group are active, caring, influential and affluent parents. They balance their families, careers and active lifestyles through adaptation of new technologies.Rugged Traditionalists: Rugged Traditionalists are outdoorsy males and tend to have traditional values. Struggling Singles: Struggling Singles are adults living alone, or single parents. They have little economic clout by very big dreams. Settled Elders: Settled elders have a median age of 85. They tend to be devout, with sedentary lifestyles. Settled elders watch more television than any other LifeMatrix segment.Free Birds: Free Birds are vital, active, healthy seniors free from work and family responsibilities, they tend to be younger and healthier than settled elders, and less likely to be living alone.<number>
  • We have created a Universal LifeMatrix segmentation, based on Values, LifeStyle and Lifestage that differentiates consumers for product usage, brands and media.The ten segments are:Tribe Wired: Are digitally oriented, big users of technology, they are fun-seeking creative young singlesFun/Atics: Are aspirational and free-spirited active young people. Dynamic Duos: Are an interesting group. They hard-driving, high-income married couples focused on their careers. They are the most affluent of all LifeMatrix segments.Priority Parents: This group is family focused. The live their lives for their children and their spouses. Children have great deal of influence in the products used by this group and in the media they consume. Not surprisingly, this group is more likely to have young children in the house.Home Soldiers: Home Soldiers are home-centric, the are family-oriented individuals with very strong aspirational values. They live their lives vicariously, they are very interested in watching extreme sports but unlikely to ever do it themselves.Renaissance Women: This group are active, caring, influential and affluent parents. They balance their families, careers and active lifestyles through adaptation of new technologies.Rugged Traditionalists: Rugged Traditionalists are outdoorsy males and tend to have traditional values. Struggling Singles: Struggling Singles are adults living alone, or single parents. They have little economic clout by very big dreams. Settled Elders: Settled elders have a median age of 85. They tend to be devout, with sedentary lifestyles. Settled elders watch more television than any other LifeMatrix segment.Free Birds: Free Birds are vital, active, healthy seniors free from work and family responsibilities, they tend to be younger and healthier than settled elders, and less likely to be living alone.<number>
  • We have created a Universal LifeMatrix segmentation, based on Values, LifeStyle and Lifestage that differentiates consumers for product usage, brands and media.The ten segments are:Tribe Wired: Are digitally oriented, big users of technology, they are fun-seeking creative young singlesFun/Atics: Are aspirational and free-spirited active young people. Dynamic Duos: Are an interesting group. They hard-driving, high-income married couples focused on their careers. They are the most affluent of all LifeMatrix segments.Priority Parents: This group is family focused. The live their lives for their children and their spouses. Children have great deal of influence in the products used by this group and in the media they consume. Not surprisingly, this group is more likely to have young children in the house.Home Soldiers: Home Soldiers are home-centric, the are family-oriented individuals with very strong aspirational values. They live their lives vicariously, they are very interested in watching extreme sports but unlikely to ever do it themselves.Renaissance Women: This group are active, caring, influential and affluent parents. They balance their families, careers and active lifestyles through adaptation of new technologies.Rugged Traditionalists: Rugged Traditionalists are outdoorsy males and tend to have traditional values. Struggling Singles: Struggling Singles are adults living alone, or single parents. They have little economic clout by very big dreams. Settled Elders: Settled elders have a median age of 85. They tend to be devout, with sedentary lifestyles. Settled elders watch more television than any other LifeMatrix segment.Free Birds: Free Birds are vital, active, healthy seniors free from work and family responsibilities, they tend to be younger and healthier than settled elders, and less likely to be living alone.<number>
  • We have created a Universal LifeMatrix segmentation, based on Values, LifeStyle and Lifestage that differentiates consumers for product usage, brands and media.The ten segments are:Tribe Wired: Are digitally oriented, big users of technology, they are fun-seeking creative young singlesFun/Atics: Are aspirational and free-spirited active young people. Dynamic Duos: Are an interesting group. They hard-driving, high-income married couples focused on their careers. They are the most affluent of all LifeMatrix segments.Priority Parents: This group is family focused. The live their lives for their children and their spouses. Children have great deal of influence in the products used by this group and in the media they consume. Not surprisingly, this group is more likely to have young children in the house.Home Soldiers: Home Soldiers are home-centric, the are family-oriented individuals with very strong aspirational values. They live their lives vicariously, they are very interested in watching extreme sports but unlikely to ever do it themselves.Renaissance Women: This group are active, caring, influential and affluent parents. They balance their families, careers and active lifestyles through adaptation of new technologies.Rugged Traditionalists: Rugged Traditionalists are outdoorsy males and tend to have traditional values. Struggling Singles: Struggling Singles are adults living alone, or single parents. They have little economic clout by very big dreams. Settled Elders: Settled elders have a median age of 85. They tend to be devout, with sedentary lifestyles. Settled elders watch more television than any other LifeMatrix segment.Free Birds: Free Birds are vital, active, healthy seniors free from work and family responsibilities, they tend to be younger and healthier than settled elders, and less likely to be living alone.<number>
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  • Language Educators: Shaping the Future in a New Era!

    1. 1. Language Educators: Shaping the Future in a New Era! The Michigan World Language Association 2008 Annual Conference Lansing, Michigan Marty Abbott, Director of Education [email_address]
    2. 4. National Security Language Initiative (NSLI) <ul><li>Department of Education </li></ul><ul><li>Department of State </li></ul><ul><li>Department of Defense </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the Director of National Intelligence </li></ul>
    3. 5. Ensuring America’s Place in the Global Economy by Building Capacity in the Schools Testimony by ACTFL President before the Senate Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management <ul><li>1. Ensure that ALL languages are supported in our educational system, not just the languages that are deemed critical for today. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage and support long sequences of language study. </li></ul><ul><li>Fund the development of assessments to measure student progress </li></ul><ul><li>Make foreign languages part of the core curriculum in every school. </li></ul>
    4. 6. <ul><li>5. Offer assistance to colleges and universities that develop language programs for special purposes and that combine language study with other programs </li></ul><ul><li>6. Provide incentives to enhance teacher recruitment and retention. </li></ul><ul><li>Require intensive training for teachers recruited from abroad. </li></ul>
    5. 7. <ul><li>Encourage continued language learning of our heritage students in both their native language and English </li></ul><ul><li>Fund research in language learning </li></ul><ul><li>Provide funding for public education initiatives to change public attitudes toward language learning. </li></ul>
    6. 8. What skills are in demand? <ul><li>According to top executives in a USA Today poll, the skills most lacking in employees are: </li></ul><ul><li>Foreign Language </li></ul><ul><li>Interpersonal </li></ul><ul><li>Administrative </li></ul><ul><li>Technical </li></ul><ul><li>Management </li></ul>
    7. 9. What skills are in demand? <ul><li>According to Michael Eskew, CEO of UPS: </li></ul><ul><li>Trade literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Sensitive to foreign cultures (cultural </li></ul><ul><li>awareness, sensitivity and diplomacy) </li></ul><ul><li>Conversant in different languages </li></ul><ul><li>Technology savvy </li></ul><ul><li>Capable of managing complexity (being </li></ul><ul><li>creative) </li></ul><ul><li>Ethical behavior – core values </li></ul>
    8. 10. <ul><li>“ To confront the twenty-first century challenges to our economy and national security, our education system must be strengthened to increase the foreign language skills and cultural awareness of our students. America’s continued global leadership will depend on our students’ abilities to interact with the world community both inside and outside our borders.” </li></ul><ul><li>Education for Global Leadership: The Importance of International Studies and Foreign Languages for U.S. Economic and National Security </li></ul><ul><li>Committee for Economic Development February 2006 </li></ul>
    9. 11. 2002 Survey of Large U.S. Corporations <ul><li>Nearly 30% of the companies believed that they had failed to exploit fully their international business opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Forty percent indicated international sales growing more rapidly than domestic </li></ul>
    10. 12. ACTFL Roper Poll 2005 Plurality of Americans Agree There Is “Too Little” Foreign Language Instruction In America’s Public Schools Base: Total Americans 18+ “ In your opinion, is there too little , too much , or the right amount of foreign language instruction in America’s public schools?” (Q.3)
    11. 13. Plurality of Americans Agree There Is “Too Little” Funding for Foreign Language Instruction In America’s Public Schools Base: Total Americans 18+ “ In your opinion, is there too little , too much , or the right amount funding for foreign language instruction in America’s public schools?” (Q.3)
    12. 14. One in Four Americans Live In a Household With Someone Fluent in More Than One Language Base: Total Americans 18+ Percent who say one or more people in household are fluent in more than one language: “ How many people living in your household, if any, speak more than one language fluently?” (Q.1)
    13. 15. Half of Americans Have Dealings With a Person Whose First Language Is Not English at Least Once a Week Base: Total Americans 18+ “ About how often would you say you have dealings with a person whose first language is not English? Would you say…” (Q.2)
    14. 16. STARTALK Student Survey <ul><li>Over 90% of the students indicated that they wanted to learn languages: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To get a better job </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Because they enjoy learning languages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To get along better with people who are different </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To learn about other people and places </li></ul></ul>
    15. 17. NRCCUA National Research Center for College & University Admissions <ul><li>Foreign Language Student Findings </li></ul><ul><li>If given the option, more students in Michigan and nationally would choose to study French than any other foreign language. </li></ul><ul><li>About 35% of students in Michigan, compared to 40% nationally said studying a foreign language has helped them in their other classes. </li></ul><ul><li>A significant majority (64%) of students in Michigan see the study of foreign language as beneficial for travel, recreation, and enjoyment. </li></ul><ul><li>25% of students in Michigan and 28% nationally plan to use a foreign language in the business world. </li></ul>
    16. 18. Foreign Language Students Report They Are Most Interested in Studying
    17. 19. Students Report Anticipated Future Use of Foreign Language Student Question #6 – Which of the following best describe your future use of foreign language?
    18. 20. Teacher Findings: <ul><li>62% of foreign language teachers in Michigan said the most challenging factor in teaching a foreign language is enrollment issues – oversized or undersized classes. </li></ul><ul><li>70% of Michigan foreign language teachers indicated they chose to teach the language they currently teach mainly because it was most interesting to them. </li></ul><ul><li>75% of foreign language teachers in Michigan and 85% across the nation believe their students chose to learn another language because it was required for graduation or necessary for college admission. </li></ul><ul><li>36% of foreign language teachers in Michigan indicated the need for more information on “best practices” in the language classroom. </li></ul>
    19. 21. Foreign Language Teachers Report Areas in Need of Support
    20. 22. Challenges Foreign Language Teachers are Facing

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