Teacher perceptions of age-appropriate reproductive health information for girls in Pakistan – what is the right age? by C...
<ul>Overview </ul><ul><li>Background
Problem and hypothesis
Scope and methodology
Results
Policy implications </li></ul>
<ul>Background </ul><ul>Project Aagahi  resulted from an ongoing public-private partnership between Procter & Gamble (P&G)...
A need to revise presentation material for their schools-based programme on menstrual education; and </li></ul></ul><ul>. ...
<ul>Background </ul><ul>The Pakistan field office of the World Population Foundation (WPF) – an international NGO working ...
Extensive local experience in implementing Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programmes </li></ul></ul>
<ul>Background </ul><ul>Collaboration offered both partners a chance to establish an  evidence base  which may be helpful ...
Advocacy for the  inclusion  of longer Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programmes in Pakistan’s core curriculum; and
Debunking  some of the myths associated with Adolescent Reproductive Health. </li></ul></ul>
<ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>The  challenge  of securing permission to enter schools was  complicated   by stereoty...
Inappropriate ;
Too  sensitive ;
Culturally  tabooed ; and
Un-Islamic . </li></ul></ul>
<ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>The evidence base gathered would also assist in  monitoring and evaluating  the progra...
Teacher  perceptions of age-appropriate delivery  of menstrual education to young women; and
Whether there was  broader interest in Life Skills Based Education . </li></ul></ul>
<ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>Myths  encountered in discussion with conservative gatekeepers in the process of secur...
Why do you need to ask about what is useful for the girls,  their elders know what is best for them .
Girls will not be comfortable  learning about the topic of menstruation – it is  not culturally-appropriate  and  too ‘sen...
Girls will be  too shy  to be actively involved in such initiatives.   </li></ul></ul>
<ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>Myths  (continued):  </ul><ul><ul><li>Even if you went ahead with this programme, how ...
The subject is  too broad  to convey enough information in the time allocated to it.
As a guest in the classroom, facilitators will not be able to quickly put the girls at ease  with the topic.
Your younger presenters will  not be able to answer the girls’ questions  – they do not know enough.   </li></ul></ul>
<ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>Myths  (continued): </ul><ul><ul><li>Your programme will not meet people’s expectation...
Girls should not be told about these matters in school –  it is a matter for their mothers to tell them .
Girls should not be exposed to this type of information before age 14 .
Teacher workload is already high and they  do not have the time for additional subjects  like life skills based education....
<ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>With our focus on youth empowerment, WPF has consistently argued that it would be  bet...
<ul>Scope and methodology </ul><ul>Our study was based on: </ul><ul><ul><li>Observation carried out in  over three thousan...
Respondents were teachers  observing the delivery of Project Aagahi in their own classrooms by trainers from P&G.
Observations were recorded on a  standardised survey tool . </li></ul></ul>
<ul>Scope and methodology </ul>
<ul>Scope and methodology </ul>
<ul>Scope and methodology </ul>
<ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 1: The session was useful for the girls Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>As people directly in...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

20061129_Teacher perceptions of age-appropriate reproductive health information for girls in Pakistan – what is the right age?

361 views

Published on

A paper on research from Project Aagahi
presented at the Population Association of Pakistan’s 7th Annual Population Research Conference, 'Population at the Crossroads of Development'
November 28-30 2006
University of Peshawar Campus, Peshawar, Pakistan.
Section VI: Investing in Youth
Wednesday 29 November 2006 1400 – 1600
Sahibzada Abdul Qayyum Hall

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
361
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

20061129_Teacher perceptions of age-appropriate reproductive health information for girls in Pakistan – what is the right age?

  1. 1. Teacher perceptions of age-appropriate reproductive health information for girls in Pakistan – what is the right age? by Christopher John Wardle Country Representative for Pakistan World Population Foundation (WPF) and Ghazala Nadeem External Relations Manager Procter & Gamble (P&G) A paper on research from Project Aagahi presented at the Population Association of Pakistan’s 7th Annual Population Research Conference 'Population at the Crossroads of Development' November 28-30 2006 University of Peshawar Campus, Peshawar, Pakistan. Section VI: Investing in Youth Wednesday 29 November 2006 1400 – 1600 Sahibzada Abdul Qayyum Hall
  2. 2. <ul>Overview </ul><ul><li>Background
  3. 3. Problem and hypothesis
  4. 4. Scope and methodology
  5. 5. Results
  6. 6. Policy implications </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul>Background </ul><ul>Project Aagahi resulted from an ongoing public-private partnership between Procter & Gamble (P&G) – the Pakistan division of a multi-national corporation with: </ul><ul><ul><li>A strong track record in corporate social responsibility; and
  8. 8. A need to revise presentation material for their schools-based programme on menstrual education; and </li></ul></ul><ul>. </ul>
  9. 9. <ul>Background </ul><ul>The Pakistan field office of the World Population Foundation (WPF) – an international NGO working in Adolescent Reproductive Health (ARH) offering P&G: </ul><ul><ul><li>Quality video resources on adolescent development; and
  10. 10. Extensive local experience in implementing Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programmes </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. <ul>Background </ul><ul>Collaboration offered both partners a chance to establish an evidence base which may be helpful in: </ul><ul><ul><li>Securing permission to enter schools with single-session menstrual education programmes in the future;
  12. 12. Advocacy for the inclusion of longer Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programmes in Pakistan’s core curriculum; and
  13. 13. Debunking some of the myths associated with Adolescent Reproductive Health. </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. <ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>The challenge of securing permission to enter schools was complicated by stereotypical misperceptions that such education was: </ul><ul><ul><li>Too commercial in its focus;
  15. 15. Inappropriate ;
  16. 16. Too sensitive ;
  17. 17. Culturally tabooed ; and
  18. 18. Un-Islamic . </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. <ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>The evidence base gathered would also assist in monitoring and evaluating the programme to determine: </ul><ul><ul><li>Areas for improvement ;
  20. 20. Teacher perceptions of age-appropriate delivery of menstrual education to young women; and
  21. 21. Whether there was broader interest in Life Skills Based Education . </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. <ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>Myths encountered in discussion with conservative gatekeepers in the process of securing permission to enter schools with this programme included: </ul><ul><ul><li>It is a waste of time telling young women about these things.
  23. 23. Why do you need to ask about what is useful for the girls, their elders know what is best for them .
  24. 24. Girls will not be comfortable learning about the topic of menstruation – it is not culturally-appropriate and too ‘sensitive’ .
  25. 25. Girls will be too shy to be actively involved in such initiatives. </li></ul></ul>
  26. 26. <ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>Myths (continued): </ul><ul><ul><li>Even if you went ahead with this programme, how much can you effectively communicate?
  27. 27. The subject is too broad to convey enough information in the time allocated to it.
  28. 28. As a guest in the classroom, facilitators will not be able to quickly put the girls at ease with the topic.
  29. 29. Your younger presenters will not be able to answer the girls’ questions – they do not know enough. </li></ul></ul>
  30. 30. <ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>Myths (continued): </ul><ul><ul><li>Your programme will not meet people’s expectations – it will offend them .
  31. 31. Girls should not be told about these matters in school – it is a matter for their mothers to tell them .
  32. 32. Girls should not be exposed to this type of information before age 14 .
  33. 33. Teacher workload is already high and they do not have the time for additional subjects like life skills based education. </li></ul></ul>
  34. 34. <ul>Problem and hypothesis </ul><ul>With our focus on youth empowerment, WPF has consistently argued that it would be better for young women to have access to information on the changes associated with the onset of their menarche prior to it occurring , rather than after the event. So, what age are we talking about? In the Population Council’s study on adolescence - Adolescents and Youth in Pakistan 2001-2002 A Nationally Representative Survey - the mean age of puberty for young women is given as 13.5 years . </ul>
  35. 35. <ul>Scope and methodology </ul><ul>Our study was based on: </ul><ul><ul><li>Observation carried out in over three thousand (3,000) classrooms in Pakistan.
  36. 36. Respondents were teachers observing the delivery of Project Aagahi in their own classrooms by trainers from P&G.
  37. 37. Observations were recorded on a standardised survey tool . </li></ul></ul>
  38. 38. <ul>Scope and methodology </ul>
  39. 39. <ul>Scope and methodology </ul>
  40. 40. <ul>Scope and methodology </ul>
  41. 41. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 1: The session was useful for the girls Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>As people directly involved in the core curricular education of the students participating in the session, teachers can offer a practical and experienced insight into what is useful for them in co-curricular sessions such as this one.
  42. 42. P&G has a broad qualitative measure of the value of the information conveyed to the students, which can be useful as a basis for assessing whether investment in this type of education session should be continued . </li></ul></ul>
  43. 43. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 1: The session was useful for the girls Results: </ul>
  44. 44. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 2: The girls were comfortable with the contents Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>Conservative gatekeepers are often out of touch with the on-the-ground realities of life in the classroom, whereas teachers offer an effective, caring, well-qualified and interested guide to student levels of topic comfort . </li></ul></ul>
  45. 45. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 2: The girls were comfortable with the contents Results: </ul>
  46. 46. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 3: The girls took active interest in the presentation Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>Does WPF’s session design reflect our focus on and valuing of youth participation ? </li></ul></ul>
  47. 47. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 3: The girls took active interest in the presentation Results: </ul>
  48. 48. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 4: Adequate information was provided through the session Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>Are our session design contents communicating the essential information and dispelling some of the common myths and misconceptions about menstruation ? </li></ul></ul>
  49. 49. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 4: Adequate information was provided through the session Results: </ul>
  50. 50. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 5: The duration of the session was adequate Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>Have we been realistic in the timing component of our session design and did we achieve what we set out to do in the time allocated? </li></ul></ul>
  51. 51. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 5: The duration of the session was adequate Results: </ul>
  52. 52. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 6: The comfort level set by the facilitator was adequate Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>Have we chosen facilitators with good communication skills ? </li></ul></ul>
  53. 53. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 6: The comfort level set by the facilitator was adequate Results: </ul>
  54. 54. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 7: The presenter had enough information and skills to reply to questions from the girls Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>Are individual facilitators well-prepared and performing to level expected of them? </li></ul></ul>
  55. 55. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 7: The presenter had enough information and skills to reply to questions from the girls Results: </ul>
  56. 56. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 8: Overall, the program met or exceeded our expectations Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>Is there a broad, qualitative indicator by which we can measure teacher satisfaction with the programme? </li></ul></ul>
  57. 57. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 8: Overall, the program met or exceeded our expectations Results: </ul>
  58. 58. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 10: Should girls in schools be informed about body changes? Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>How can we assess an absolute view of teachers’ perceptions of the need for education on adolescent development in schools ? </li></ul></ul>
  59. 59. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 10: Should girls in schools be informed about body changes? Results: </ul>
  60. 60. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 11: If YES, at what age do you think girls should learn about body changes? Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>According to teacher perceptions, what is the most appropriate age to deliver this type of education to young women ? </li></ul></ul>
  61. 61. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 11: If YES, at what age do you think girls should learn about body changes? Results: </ul>
  62. 62. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 12: Would you like to have more information on a life skills based education program that deals with imparting knowledge and skills on broader issues to young girls? Rationale: </ul><ul><ul><li>Is there broader interest in life skills based education ? </li></ul></ul>
  63. 63. <ul>Results </ul><ul>Observation 12: Would you like to have more information on a life skills based education program that deals with imparting knowledge and skills on broader issues to young girls? Results: </ul>
  64. 64. <ul>Policy implications </ul><ul>Start earlier: </ul><ul><ul><li>Information for young women on the changes associated with adolescence should be given to them prior to puberty; </li></ul></ul><ul>LSBE is an appropriate mechanism: </ul><ul><ul><li>The introduction of such information through a programme of Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) would be an acceptable and effective vehicle for policy-makers; </li></ul></ul><ul>Curriculum reform: </ul><ul><ul><li>We strongly urge the Government to build on these results and make LSBE a part of Pakistan’s national core curriculum, including it in both pre-service and in-service training . </li></ul></ul>
  65. 65. <ul>On being “brave and angry” … </ul><ul>WPF Board Member, Dr Nafis Sadik, Beijing, September 1995. </ul>
  66. 66. <ul>On being “brave and angry” … </ul><ul>We must be courageous in speaking out on the issues that concern us. We must not bend under the weight of spurious arguments invoking culture or traditional values. No value worth the name supports the oppression and enslavement of women. The function of culture and tradition is to provide a framework for human well being. If they are used against us, we will reject them and move on. We will not allow ourselves to be silenced. WPF Board Member, Dr Nafis Sadik, Beijing, September 1995. </ul>
  67. 67. <ul>This has been a presentation entitled: Teacher perceptions of age-appropriate reproductive health information for girls in Pakistan– what is the right age ? </ul><ul>For further information or to offer your support for our work please contact: Christopher John Wardle Country Representative for Pakistan World Population Foundation (WPF) PO Box 736 Islamabad, Pakistan. voice: +92 51 211 0539 fax: +92 51 211 0536 email: wpf@wpfpak.com (office) cjwardle@gmail.com (private) </ul>

×