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Stretchingand warmup120310

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pre-exercise warm up and stretches

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Stretchingand warmup120310

  1. 1. Outline 1. Stretching v. Warm-up 1. Definition 2. Purposes 3. Effectiveness 4. Recommendations 2. Warm-up for Skating 3. Stretching for Skating 1. Type of Stretching 2. When to Stretch 3. What to Stretch A Figure Skaters Guide to Warming Up and Stretching Warm-up for Success Deborah L. King, PhD, Department Exercise and Sport Sciences, Ithaca College Figure Skating Medical Symposium, CMC Sports Medicine Athletic Performance, December 2010
  2. 2. Warm – up Activities and movements that increase body temperature prior to exercise Stretching Activities or motions that increase the extensibility of muscles Definitions
  3. 3. Purposes Warm-up – Improve performance • Increase body temperature – Increases muscle force, nerve conduction, rate of chemical reactions, strength and power • Increase heart rate and respiratory rate – Increase blood flow and exchange of O2 and CO2 • Mental/psychological preparation – Imagery, Focus of attention, Motivation, Arousal – Decrease injuries • Increase body temperature – Improve extensibility of muscles
  4. 4. Purposes Stretching – Long term (daily stretching over months and years): • Improve flexibility – Attain proper positions or postures for sport – Improved performance • Avoid muscle or joint imbalances – Maintain proper mechanics – Short term (stretching prior to exercise): • Improve extensibility of muscles and pain free range of motion – Prevent muscle strains or other injuries
  5. 5. Stretching – Limited and conflicting evidence that stretching PRIOR to exercise decreases injury rates • Pre-participation stretching is – Ineffective in reducing over use injuries (military, running, team sports) – Only somewhat effective in reducing muscle strains – Stretching PRIOR to performance decreases force production of muscles • Pre-participation stretching: – Decreases strength output – Can decrease power output Effectiveness
  6. 6. Warm-up – Focus on active (dynamic) components: • Generally improve performance • May lessen injury rates – To enhance performance: • Raise body temperature (avoid excessive thermoregulatory strain) • Elevate VO2 • Include brief task-specific bursts – To prevent acute sport specific injuries: • Warm up exercises – about 5 min • Technique alignment exercises – about 5 minutes • Balance exercises – about 5 minutes • Strength & Power exercises – about 2 minutes Recommendations
  7. 7. Practice – Off ice • 5 minutes of activities to raise body temperature – Jump rope , Exercise bike, Slide board, Jogging • 5 minutes dynamic stretching – Ankles, Knee flexors/extensors, Hip flexion/extension, Hip Abduction/Adduction • 5 minutes balance/strength/speed /power – Lunges – Off ice jumps & Landings – Sprints or quick bursts with jump rope, bike, slide board Specifics for Skaters – Warm-up
  8. 8. Practice – On ice • 5 minutes of skating to raise body temperature • 5 minutes dynamic stretching – Next to board • Knee flexors/extensors, Hip flexion/extension, Hip Abduction/Adduction – While skating • Lunges, squats • 5 minutes balance/speed/power – Crossovers and glide length of ice on one foot – Waltz jumps focus on height and landing – Power stroking, footwork, … Specifics for Skaters – Warm-up
  9. 9. Competition • Off ice warm up (about 15 minutes) prior to on ice group warm-up • Depending on skate order, after group warm-up – Short wait: • Skates on: – Mental run through – Dynamic stretches to stay warm – Long wait • Skates off: – 5-10 minutes warm up that can be repeated – Walk through program off ice • Skates on – Mental run through – Dynamic stretches to stay warm Specifics for Skaters – Warm-up
  10. 10. Things to remember: – Rinks are cold – Skaters will cool off quickly • Have Layers • Keep Moving Specifics for Skaters – Warm-up
  11. 11. Stretching – Flexibility is important – Skaters can easily develop muscle imbalances A habitual stretching program is important – Stretch after practices, in evenings – Raise body temp prior to stretching – Target muscle groups that: • Tend to get tight and are over worked • Allow needed flexibility for sport performance Recommendations
  12. 12. Types of Stretches • Static – Recommended 5 minutes of total stretch per muscle group – Typically do 5 x 60 seconds • PNF Stretching - common technique is Contract-Relax – Contract muscle against resistance for 10 seconds – Relax and stretch for 30 + seconds – Repeat 2 to 5 times • Dynamic Stretching – Move joints through ROM with controlled exaggerated motions – Can do set time or repeat set distances Specifics for Skaters – Habitual Stretching
  13. 13. Muscles that tend to get tight: – Calf (gastrocnemius and soleus) Specifics for Skaters – Habitual Stretching
  14. 14. Muscles that tend to get tight: – Tibialis Anterior Specifics for Skaters – Habitual Stretching
  15. 15. Muscles that tend to get tight: – Low back (erector spinae) Specifics for Skaters – Habitual Stretching
  16. 16. Muscles that tend to get tight: – Hip Abductors (TFL, Gluteus Medius) Specifics for Skaters – Habitual Stretching
  17. 17. Muscles that tend to get tight: – Hip Adductors (Iliopsoas, rectus femoris) Specifics for Skaters – Habitual Stretching
  18. 18. Muscles that tend to get tight: – Hip Flexors (Iliopsoas, rectus femoris) Specifics for Skaters – Habitual Stretching
  19. 19. Muscles that tend to get tight: – Hip Extensors (gluteus maximums, hamstrings) Specifics for Skaters – Habitual Stretching
  20. 20. Muscles that tend to get tight: – Hip Lateral Rotators (piriformis, gluteus maximus) Specifics for Skaters – Habitual Stretching
  21. 21. Stretching Tips 1. After practice, training, or evenings is recommended 2. Warm up muscles before stretching – If at rink, find a warm room 3. Aim for 5 minutes of each muscle group – Many stretches will do more than one muscle group at a time 4. Focus on: – Muscles prone to tightness/imbalances – Joints needing range of motion 5. Flexibility does not necessarily • decrease injury rates • Improve performance
  22. 22. Three Keys to Success • Warm–up – Raise your body temp, HR, breathing rate • Warm-up – Use dynamic stretching to take muscles through ROM • Warm-up – Add balance, speed, and power activities
  23. 23. And Lastly • Maintain muscle balances and joint ranges of motion with stretching as part of your conditioning program not as part of a warm-up Questions and Discussion ….

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