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Dysfunctional Families<br />The Effects on Children<br />
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />In my findings on my research topic of the effects on children from dys...
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />My research question would be: How do these children fight for a better...
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />We need to make people wake up and realize that if they see a child tha...
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Children who come from dysfunctional homes tend to turn to alcohol and ...
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Many of the children from dysfunctional homes tend to go to the doctors...
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Many doctors look at these children and determine that they are just ly...
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />These children usually end up committing crimes, they are not bad kids ...
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Many gangs members realize this and this is how they recruit other kids...
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />References:<br />Argosy University. (2010). Advanced General Psychology...
Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Leve, Leslie,. (2004). Female Juvenile Offenders: Defining an Early-Ons...
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Dysfunctional Families

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Dysfunctional Families

  1. 1. Dysfunctional Families<br />The Effects on Children<br />
  2. 2. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />In my findings on my research topic of the effects on children from dysfunctional families, I found that the arguments are all about the same. In many they talk about how the child does not have to grow up like the parents or how they have options to get out or get help. They talk about how they can overcome these obstacles and fight for a better life. <br />
  3. 3. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />My research question would be: How do these children fight for a better life if they do not know any better? We need to find a way to get to these families and children and help them. Many of these children do not know that there is help out there for them. They do not come forward and say hay, my family is messed up I need help. Teachers do not go out of there way to look for problems with families, they are there for the students. Most children hide the problems at home, and the communities in most towns do not go out of their way for others. <br />
  4. 4. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />We need to make people wake up and realize that if they see a child that may need help to stop and help. Not turn their backs on them and tell their children to stay away from them. We need to get the word out that there is help out there and the children can come forward. For those who think things are fine and do not know the difference we need to educate them better. Anyone can teach a child how to read, write and do math, but, we can teach them to stand up for themselves and know right from wrong and how to know the difference. All the classroom studies will not help them if they turn to drugs, crime or gangs. <br />
  5. 5. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Children who come from dysfunctional homes tend to turn to alcohol and drugs to make themselves feel better. This a way for the children to cope with the everyday stressors of the family. They have no structure in their lives and are at a loss of what to do next. These children can become remarkable students and people as they grow older if they have just even one person in their lives to stand for them. These individuals need to be there for the children and make them realize that they can make it through life even if their family has no clue what is going on. (Dakof, Gayle A. (2000). Understanding gender differences in adolescent drug abuse)<br />
  6. 6. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Many of the children from dysfunctional homes tend to go to the doctors office’s and emergency rooms more then any other child. The children are fighting for attention and feel that they will get it even if for only a few hours. Many of these children are also suffering from stress which can turn into depression. They often do not feel good but, they do not realize that it is depression that is making them feel so bad. Depression can go unnoticed for years, especially if the doctor does not know about the family. <br />
  7. 7. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Many doctors look at these children and determine that they are just lying to get out of school or just want attention. They do not stop and think about the reason behind the illnesses. This in return makes it harder on the entire family because then the parents stop taking the child to the doctors, telling them that it is in their head and they are not sick. (Bellón, Juan Angel; Delgado-Sánchez, Ana. (2007). Patient psychosocial factors and primary care consultation: ) <br />
  8. 8. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />These children usually end up committing crimes, they are not bad kids they are just lost and have no sense of what to do. Many of these children coming from dysfunctional homes join gangs in their area to feel like they are a part of a family. While gangs are bad and many of the members end up in prison or in the morgue, they do have a sense of family for the members. They back each other up and always feel like they are protected and loved. This is the reason most of them are in gangs, they say it is their family. Everything they are missing out on at home the gangs provide it. <br />
  9. 9. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Many gangs members realize this and this is how they recruit other kids to join. They offer them protection, love, family and easy money. A lot of the children going into gangs see this as a way out of their life with their real family. Many children crave that attention and they don’t care where they get it from. They do not look at the consequences of their actions, no one has taught them how to. This is where most children decide to do drugs, they have a way out and feel nothing. They try and make themselves numb to what is going on around them. (Rapp, Lisa A,. Wodarski, John S. (1997). Juvenile violence: The high risk factors, current interventions, and implications for social work practice.)<br />
  10. 10. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />References:<br />Argosy University. (2010). Advanced General Psychology. Module 3: Module Overview. Retrieved March 22, 2010, from http://myeclassonline.com/<br />Bellón, Juan Angel; Delgado-Sánchez, Ana. (2007). Patient psychosocial factors and primary care consultation: A cohort study. Family Practice Distress; Primary Health Care; Professional Consultation; Psychosocial Factors; Social Support; Clients; Family; Mental Health <br />Bradley, Jennifer Ann. (2001). Evaluating the concept of the narcissistic family: Development of the Childhood Experiences Questionnaire. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering Dysfunctional Family; Emotional Adjustment; Narcissism; Questionnaires; Test Construction; Attachment Behavior <br />Crespi, Tony D. (1996). Violent children and adolescents: Facing the treatment crisis in child and family interaction. Journal of Family Therapy; Violence <br />Dakof, Gayle A. (2000). Understanding gender differences in adolescent drug abuse: Issues of co morbidity and family functioning. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs Adolescent Psychology; Co morbidity; Drug Abuse; Family Relations; Human Sex Differences; Dysfunctional Family<br />
  11. 11. Dysfunctional FamiliesThe Effects on Children<br />Leve, Leslie,. (2004). Female Juvenile Offenders: Defining an Early-Onset Pathway for Delinquency. Journal of Child & Family Studies; Vol. 13 Issue 4, p439-452, 14p, 3 charts<br />Rapp, Lisa A,. Wodarski, John S. (1997). Juvenile violence: The high risk factors, current interventions, and implications for social work practice. Journal of Applied Social Sciences At Risk Populations; Juvenile Delinquency; Perpetrators; Treatment; <br />Wade, Shari L.; Walz, Nicolay Chertkoff. (2010). Family, school, and community: Their role in the rehabilitation of children. Handbook of rehabilitation psychology (2nd) ed. Communities; Disorders; Family; Rehabilitation; Schools; Adjustment; Distress; Pediatrics; Stress<br />Wood, Jenifer., Foy, W. David. (2002). An Examination of the Relationships Between Violence Exposure, Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology, and Delinquent Activity: An 'Ecopathological' Model of Delinquent Behavior Among Incarcerated... <br />Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma; Vol. 6 Issue 1, p127-147, 21p<br />Wood, Jenifer., Foy, David., (2002). Violence Exposure and PTSD Among Delinquent Girls. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma; Vol. 6 Issue 1, p109-126, 18p<br />

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