Real world experience with provisioning services

4,899 views

Published on

If you use Citrix NetScaler for secure remote access to your Citrix XenApp/Citrix XenDesktop deployment, you may be wondering if there’s more that it can do. You are correct! NetScaler also offers load balancing, global server load balancing, web interface integration, HDX traffic inspection and much more. It can enhance Citrix ShareFile StorageZones and Citrix mobile deployments. Join this session for a quick NetScaler refresher.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,899
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
170
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Real world experience with provisioning services

  1. 1. 1  
  2. 2. I’m  not  an  analyst  or  blogger,  I’ve  worked  on  the  customer  side  as  a  sysadmin,  engineer  and  even  a  developer  (I  can’t  code  anything  well!).    More  recently  I  have  been  on  the  partner  side  and  generally  handle  architec@ng  large  vdi  deployments  and  a  number  of  other  things.    First  used  PVS  as  a  Citrix  customer  in  2008  Am  currently  an  architect  and  I  implement  solu@ons  u@lizing  PVS  Many  of  my  deployments  are  over  5,000  concurrent  seats    I’m  not  pitching  Citrix,  I’m  pitching  stuff  that  works.    Also  I’ve  aOended  partner  breakouts  and  felt  I  was  in  an  infomerical  being  pitched  something.  This  is  not  one  of  those  presenta@ons.  2  
  3. 3. XenApp  is  a  great  argument,  but  with  the  newest  XenDesktop  version,  it  isn’t  much  of  a  reason  today.    Nevertheless,  not  everyone  gets  to  upgrade  immediately  and  for  that  reason,  it  does  s@ll  make  sense.    Storage  concerns  are  a  huge  issue.    Did  you  know  that  if  your  storage  doesn’t  support  na@ve  thin-­‐provisioning  or  deduplica@on  (also  known  as  combina@on  but  I  digress),  then  you  really  will  not  have  a  storage  savings.    Furthermore,  designed  correctly,  PVS  will  be  able  to  deliver  beOer  performance  than  MCS.    If  you’re  not  using  XenServer  then  you  should  consider  PVS.    XenServer  +  MCS  should  be  whispering  Intellicache  in  your  mind.  If  you’re  not  using  XenServer  than  you  can’t  really  use  Intellicache,  but  you  can  obtain  similar  performance  with  PVS.    What?  You’re  convinced  that  vmware’s  CBRC  (content  based  read  cache)  will  solve  your  issue?    Then  my  next  point  is  that…  Scale  is  the  biggest  factor.    I  bet  you  thought  I  was  going  to  say  MCS  couldn’t  scale.    I’m  not!    It  can  support  large  numbers,  even  over  5,000  seats  which  is  usually  where  I  recommend  XenDesktop  over  Vmware  View.      The  reason  I  do  this  is  because  of  updates.    Have  you  ever  tried  to  update  a  large  view  or  Citrix  MCS  deployment?    I  hope  you  have  a  movie  to  watch  or  two  because  off  a  single  image,  it  takes  quite  a  long  @me.    Had  you  used  PVS,  a  reboot,  probably  staggered,  is  really  all  you  needed.  So  the  next  ques@on  is…why  do  I  care?  3  
  4. 4. Upda@ng  the  image  is  really  the  key  for  PVS,  this  beats  out  almost  all  other  arguments  for  me.    Demos  and  POCs  won’t  show  the  pain  you  will  encounter  once  you  scale  out.    Recomposing,  to  borrow  the  vmware  term,  involves  rebuilding  the  image  and  propaga@ng  it.  This  can  add  up  VERY  quickly  into  some  unacceptable  update  @mes.    Add  to  this  the  inability  to  quickly  recover  or  to  add  that  last  minute  update  you  forgot.  How  are  you  dealing  with  normal  update  cycles?  Do  you  assume  you’ll  never  update  the  image?  Good  luck  with  that.    The  excep@on  involves  a  low  desktop  to  vdisk  ra@o.    If  I  have  500  desktops  but  use  10  images  a  recompose  isn’t  going  to  kill  me.    Furthermore,  if  I  have  mul@ple  pools  to  help  divide  the  work  this  also  helps.    The  issue  with  that  method  though  invalidates  the  simplicity  MCS  offers  in  the  first  place.    You  now  have  mul@ple  images  to  update.    4  
  5. 5. A  high  level  overview  of  a  PVS  setup    PVS  is  database  driven  (btw,  we  usually  enable  offline  mode,  disabled  by  default,  in  produc@on  environments).  You  need  to  make  sure  SQL  is  setup  well.    The  PVS  Server  holds  the  gold  image  on  a  data  store  which  generally  is  a  read-­‐only  copy  of  an  OS  image  (think  the  C:  drive).  A  Target  Device  is  a  virtual  or  physical  machine  (usually  a  VM)  that  oien  is  really  a  placeholder  or  shell  for  the  streamed  C:  drive  or  gold  image.    I  generally  add  a  D:  drive  (a  write  cache).    A  target  device  has  no  C:  drive  and  must  have  a  NIC  that  can  PXE  boot.    We  usually  send  the  target  a  bootstrap  file  through  DHCP  &  PXE  that  tells  it  to  download  a  TFTP  BIN  file.  It  loads  the  BIN  file  and  runs  it,  the  BIN  pulls  in  the  C:  drive  from  the  PVS  server  over  the  network  and  boot  proceeds  normally.    If  a  D:  drive  is  present  (and  a  few  other  steps)  it  will  place  all  the  writes  on  the  D:  drive,  otherwise  it  needs  to  put  them  somewhere  else  (to  be  con@nued!)  5  
  6. 6. For  HA  we  should  always  add  another  PVS  server  with  a  SEPARATE  vdisk  store  (you  can  mix  SAN/local  disk,  etc  here)    If  we  leave  DHCP  alone  we  add  a  point  of  failure  where  target  devices  may  fail  to  boot.    You  can  use  2008  R2  or  2012  to  provide  split  scope  or  u@lize  a  more  redundant  solu@on  such  as  bluecat  or  infoblox.    PXE  and  TFTP  is  another  point  of  HA  concern,  you  can  only  provide  true  HA  with  a  hardware  load  balancer.    I  oien  do  NOT  provide  HA  for  TFTP  but  if  you  have  a  hardware  load  balancer  there  is  no  reason  not  to.  PXE  will  load  the  bootstrap  which,  if  not  specified  with  you  PVS  servers,  won’t  work  (you  need  to  add  them)    Use  mirroring  with  SQL  if  you  can.    It’s  great  and  clustering  doesn’t  really  prevent  you  from  dealing  with  issues  such  as  the  storage  failing!    If  your  storage  will  never  ever  fail  then  that’s  awesome  but  keep  in  mind  I  can  use  local  storage  and  mirroring  and  preOy  much  get  the  same  benefits,  well  except  for  the  feeling  of  spending  tons  of  money.  Clustering  helps  update  SQL  nodes  one  at  a  @me  while  keeping  SQL  up,  this  generally  is  not  something  I  do,  but  I  do  recommend  mirroring.  Mirroring  requires  a  witness  server,  a  3rd  server  that  doesn’t  do  anything  other  than  help  with  the  quorum  (sql  deciding  what  server  is  primary).    If  you  set  this  up  and  lose  a  secondary  and  a  witness,  the  primary  will  stop.    I  oien  put  my  witness  on  a  local  disk.    6  
  7. 7. Personally  I  think  going  with  Centralized  is  not  a  good  idea.    CIFS  sucks  performance  wise  and  you  need  to  realize  where  the  data  lives.    Is  it  off  a  NAS  head  on  a  SAN?    CIFS  requires  a  lot  of  processing,  some  vendors  have  even  started  removing  it  while  providing  NFS.    Speaking  of  “weirdness”  this  can  come  from  Centralized  also  and  is  really  a  result  of  HA.    PVS  s@ll  doesn’t  seem  that  “smart”  for  new  image  crea@on  or  for  versioning  some@mes.    Oien  your  best  bet  is  to  shut  down  the  other  server  (for  two-­‐node  clusters)  or      Much  of  this  slide  data  is  from  SUM305  from  2012  (Gareth  O’Brien)  7  
  8. 8.  You  ALWAYS  want  to  cache  on  the  device  hard  drive,  your  write  IOPS  are  at  the  device.  Server  based  will  send  the  writes  over  the  network  and  just  add  overhead  and  latency  RAM  is  preOy  cool  but  you’ve  got  to  size  that  correctly,  or  you  risk  filling  up  the  cache.    It  is  as  fast  as  your  memory  so  you  should  play  with  it  if  you  get  the  chance  8  
  9. 9. PVS  will  place  the  page  file  on  the  first  disk  other  than  C:  that  is  NTFS  if  it  fits.    So  if  you  size  a  5GB  cache  and  have  a  3GB  page,  you  get  less  than  2GB  for  cache.  Sizing  the  page  file  is  beyond  this  talk  but  you  want  to  size  them  correctly  Reference  for  Page  Files  -­‐  hOp://blogs.citrix.com/2011/12/23/the-­‐pagefile-­‐done-­‐right/    Some  great  blogs  out  there  on  sizing:  My  personal  favorite  and  I  think  he  provides  a  great  explana@on  is  Paul  Wilson  hOp://virtualiza@onjedi.com/2012/10/02/determining-­‐the-­‐size-­‐of-­‐your-­‐provisioning-­‐services-­‐write-­‐cache/    Kenny  Baldwin  from  iVision  in  Atlanta  has  a  great  script  that  will  monitor  PVS  cache  sizes  over  70%  and  send  an  alert.    Haven’t  used  it  yet  because  he  posted  it  today  hOp://desktopsandapps.com/2013/05/23/pvs-­‐write-­‐cache-­‐monitor/  9  
  10. 10. If  you  can,  put  DHCP  on  the  PVS  server.    You’re  putng  the  service  on  the  server  that  needs  to  use  it.  This  is  important  if  you  use  a  dual-­‐nic,  isolated  network  as  whatever  you  use  for  DHCP  won’t  reach  the  network.    In  this  case  though,  if  you’re  on  an  AD  domain,  you’ll  need  domain  admin  access  to  authorize  a  new  DHCP  server,  even  on  an  isolated  network.    If  that’s  not  going  to  happen,  you  “could”  do  some  freeware  DHCP  servers  but  I’d  steer  away  from  them  in  produc@on.  10  
  11. 11. Dual  NICs  make  sense  for  1GE  or  slower  NICs.    You  want  an  isolated  network  when  you  have  PXE  conflicts  on  the  main  network  also,  perhaps  LANDesk  is  conflic@ng?  If  you  use  hyper-­‐V  you  will  most  likely  use  two  NICS.    You’re  stuck  doing  a  PXE  from  a  legacy  adapter  which  is  100Mbps.    Although  some  say  this  is  usually  sufficient  or  it’s  use  a  label  but  not  limited,  for  produc@on  I  always  assume  it’s  too  slow  and  labelled  correctly.    You  would  then  add  a  second  Enhanced  NIC  that  does  everything  else.    This  setup  obviously  lends  well  to  an  isolated  PVS  VLAN  setup.        Defines  which  NIC  to  use  for  IPC  communica@on  in  a  mul@  NIC  environment  HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoiwareCitrixProvisioningServicesIPC  Reg_sz  called  IPv4Address  with  the  IP  of  the  NIC  for  IPC  Without  it,  stores,  replica@on,  load  balancing  etc  won’t  work  Affects  stream  service  Manager  key  for  MAPI  works  the  same  way  HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWARECitrixProvisioningServicesManager  RegSZ  called  GeneralInetAddr  with  the  IP  of  the  NIC  and  port    Eg  10.1.1.2:6909  BTW,  both  keys  usually  are  the  NIC  you  are  using  for  PVS  streaming.    Also  you  can  actually  bypass  PXE  and  use  the  Boot  Device  Manager,  BDM  can  burn  an  ISO  or  write  to  the  disk  itself.    It’s  not  a  bad  op@on  but  generally  I  use  PXE.  11  
  12. 12. Versioning  is  a  fantas@c  addi@on  to  PVS,  it  was  introduced  in  version  6.    It  is  simply  snapshot  for  your  vdisks    I  use  versioning  all  the  @me  but  when  I  make  major  updates  I’ll  make  a  full  copy.    Not  a  bad  prac@ce  just  in  case  something  gets  corrupted.    You  have  to  keep  an  eye  on  how  deep  the  versions  get,  I  almost  never  go  past  7  deep.    Too  make  versions  will  affect  performance.  12  
  13. 13. Versioning  on  PVS  with  HA  can  be  tricky.    You  should  disable  anything  that  is  automa@cally  copying  disks  to  the  other  stores  when  you  create  a  new  version  since  it  is  writeable.      Obviously  once  you  are  done  and  seal  the  version  (promo@ng  it  to  test  or  produc@on)  you  should  copy  it  (again  AFTER  promo@ng  it)  to  the  other  stores.    Some@mes  the  maintenance  version  is  placed  on  the  other  PVS  server,  in  this  case  you  may  want  to  use  an  ISO  to  boot,  shut  the  stream  service  down  on  one  or  move  the  file  or  even  start  over.  13  
  14. 14. The  bootstrap  for  TFTP  lists  your  failover  servers,  this  is  true  from  both  ISO  and  DHCP  boots  so  you  need  to  list  them  all,  otherwise  failover  will  not  occur.    This  is  NOT  HA,  it’s  failover    You  always  want  to  make  sure  the  guidelines  are  followed  for  the  NIC  setup,  most  notably  disabling  TCP  Offload.    If  you  use  DFS-­‐R,  do  not  use  the  read-­‐only  mode,  just  don’t  use  it  however  temp@ng  it  may  be.  14  
  15. 15. You  can  disable  the  boot  menu  for  maintenance  target  devices.    If  you  didn’t  know,  when  you  boot  a  target  device  in  maintenance  mode,  it  will  prompt  you  on  boot  as  to  which  vdisk  version  you  would  like  to  use.    This  is  an  issue  if  you  weren’t  prepared  to  use  the  console  of  the  machine.    There  is  a  way  around  this  however!    Set  the  skipbootmenu  registry  value    Don’t  be  scared  of  the  advanced  setngs,  the  remote  and  local  concurrent  I/O  limits  can  be  set  to  higher  than  the  default  4  if  you  have  fast  disks.    If  you  have  very  fast  disks,  you  can  eliminate  the  limit  by  setng  it  to  0    Add  Network  service  to  vdisk  security  setngs  if  you  have  “can’t  read  from  disk”  errors.  Also  SPNs  for  service  acounts    -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐NOTES-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  Add  more  on  advanced  setngs  15  
  16. 16. 1)  HA  topology  2)  vDISK  proper@es  including  target  devices  3)  Versioning  16  
  17. 17. Just  remember….  17  
  18. 18. 18  
  19. 19. 19  
  20. 20. 20  

×