Nouns

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Nouns

  1. 1. A noun is a word used to name a person, animal, place, thing, and abstract idea. For examples, teacher, tiger, school, car, health, happiness…  It may name a real object, an idea or even an action. 
  2. 2. ● Types of nouns: ● Common ● Proper ● Compound ● Collective ● Concrete ● Abstract
  3. 3. Teacher John Luneta Park book birthday
  4. 4. COMMON PROPER ABSTRACT COLLECTIVE Fish Ella Laughter Pod Tree Mosman Happiness Fleet Book America Trust Smack Apple Julia Brilliance School Pencil Melbourne Honesty Herd
  5. 5.  Nouns can be classified into two big groups: common nouns and proper nouns. 1) Proper nouns: A proper noun is a noun that names some particular or special place, person, people, or thing. A proper noun should always begin with a capital letter; as, Bopha, Phnom Penh, the World Bank, Samsung, the Red Sea, Cambodia, …
  6. 6. Examples:  Ferrari  New Braunfels High School  Wal-Mart  German Shepherd  Tabby 
  7. 7. Jose Rizal Mayon Volcano Christmas Magic Flakes
  8. 8. 2) Common Nouns: A common noun is a general or class name. It refers to a person, place, or thing in a general; as, woman, city, dog, shoe, sea, village, mountain…
  9. 9. Examples:  Car  School  Store  Dog  Cat 
  10. 10. hero volcano crackers family
  11. 11.    Common nouns are also classified into smaller groups: Concrete and abstract nouns. Concrete nouns: These name something that you can perceive with your five senses – something that physically exists; as, table, school, car, horse, ship… Abstract nouns: These are the opposite of concrete. They name something that you cannot perceive with your five senses – something that does not physically exist; as, education, kindness, health, happiness, ...
  12. 12.  There are special rules for forming the plural of some nouns: To form the plural of some nouns ending in 'f' or 'fe', change the 'f‘ to a 'v' and add es Example: half>, halves knife> knives  To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and followed by an 'o', just add s Example: video> videos radio> radios 
  13. 13. Compound nouns are nouns made up of two or more words. Some compound nouns are hyphenated.  Examples:  Fire truck  Mother-in-Law  Pickpocket  Bulldog  Notebook 
  14. 14.          A collective noun is the word used for a group of people or things. Examples: Team Regiment Family Seniors Gang Band Galaxy
  15. 15. An abstract noun CANNOT be detected with your five senses.  Examples:  Bravery  Fear  Trust  Curiosity  Deceit  Relaxation 
  16. 16. A concrete noun CAN be detected with your five senses.  Examples:  House  Automobile  Computer  Pencil  Chair 
  17. 17.  Nouns, in sentences, can function as: [1] subject: Subject tells whom or what the sentence is about; as,  Samnang works in a bank.  Economics is an interesting subject. [2] direct object: direct object receives the action of the verb; as,  He eats ice cream.  They play tennis.
  18. 18.  Nouns, in sentences, can function as: [3] indirect object: Indirect object receives the direct object; as,  He bought his friend a pen.  The company offers Thavy a new position. [4] object of preposition: Object of the preposition is the noun or pronoun after a preposition; as,  The boy was hurt in the accident.  The driver filled the fuel tank of the bus.
  19. 19.  Nouns, in sentences, can function as: [5] subject complement: Predicate nominative renames the subject, always after a linking verb; as,  I am a candidate.  I am the owner of that Café. [6] object complement: Object complement completes the direct object; as,  I considered him brother.  They elected Bunna President.
  20. 20.  Nouns, in sentences, can function as: [7] appositive: An appositive is a noun or pronoun placed near another noun or pronoun. The appositive enhances our understanding of the original noun or pronoun; as,  Ravy, our class monitor, studies very hard.  Her sister, Anna, was an intelligent student. [8] adjective: Noun functions as adjective when it modifies another noun functions as adjective; as,  The water pump is broken.  She wore sport clothes.
  21. 21. Singular Plural •Only one •Two or more
  22. 22.  Most nouns form the plural by adding s to the singular noun.  Lecture – lectures  Book – books  Tree – trees  Thing – things  Board - boards
  23. 23.  Nouns ending in y preceded by a consonant form the plural by changing y to i and adding es. – lilies  Lady – ladies  Baby – babies  Fairy – fairies  Berry - berries  Lily
  24. 24.  Nouns ending in s, x, z, ch and sh form the plural by adding es. – boxes  Church – churches  Buzz – buzzes  Bus – buses  Match matches  Box
  25. 25.  Nouns ending in o preceded by a consonant generally form the plural by es to the singular. – tomatoes  Potato – potatoes  Tomato
  26. 26.  Some nouns form the plural by changing f or fe to ves. – calves  Half – halves  Knife – knives  Wife – wives  Loaf - loaves  Calf
  27. 27. A few nouns have the same form in the singular and plural. – deer  Swine – swine  Apparatus – apparatus  Nose – nose  Chinese Chinese  Deer
  28. 28. A few nouns form the plural by changing the word. – teeth  Mouse – mice  Child – children  Man – men  Foot - feet  Tooth
  29. 29.  Compound nouns form the plural by adding s to the important word.  Father-in-law – fathers-in-law  Passer-by – passers-by  Editor-in-chief – editors-inchief
  30. 30.  Common nouns in ful form the plural by adding s. – cupfuls  Spoonful – spoonfuls  Cupful
  31. 31.  The plural of numbers and letters is formed by adding ‘s to the singular. – 6’s  T – T’s  1 – 1’s  S – S’s  23 – 23’s 6
  32. 32. Form the possessiv e case of singular nouns by adding ‘s. – Charles’ car  Boy – boy’s pants  Bird – bird’s nest  Charles
  33. 33.  When two nouns indicate Mickey and joint Minnie’s ownership, the show sign of possession is Pedro and placed after the second Juan’s room noun. Elsa and Kiko’s store
  34. 34.  When two  Remy’s and nouns indicate Pat’s bags separate ownership,  Bien’s and add the sign of possession Dwayne’s to both nouns. toys  Mikko’s and Yuri’s grades
  35. 35.  Compound nouns form the possessive case by adding apostrophe s (‘s) to the last word.  Mother-in- law’s dish  Secretarygeneral’s wife  Editor-inchief’s article
  36. 36.  Nouns by Sexon, D. Professor at Pasig Catholic College, July 2012, 2013 http://www.slideshare.net/draizelle_sexon/nouns-24158875?qid=a8f565df-6af3-4e61ab3f-c8b49c11a262&v=qf1&b=&from_search=8  Nouns by Guerrero, P and Burgess, W. September 2012 http://www.slideshare.net/qwerty830/nouns-14472879?qid=ce6274b6-7959-4e0b9f39-fd490db6f60d&v=default&b=&from_search=3  Nouns by An Teng, S. July 2013 http://www.slideshare.net/Greendiamount/nouns-24443425?qid=86fc1416-1ebf-40b2abc0-b9333d7063e4&v=default&b=&from_search=1      Nouns by Danica Ramos, M and Lopez, L. October 2011 http://www.slideshare.net/maradanica/nouns-9727161?qid=8b188ecd-a60a-4bcf-8f18298d5b00a75b&v=qf1&b=&from_search=1 Nouns by Freeman, E. September 2013. http://www.slideshare.net/EllaFreeman/nouns-26224822?qid=a2a702c6-672a-41adae2d-e3968839a7f6&v=default&b=&from_search=1

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