Sound Design for Broadcast Journalism

2,471 views

Published on

This Keynote discusses the basics of audio recording as well as the aesthetics of sound for broadcast journalism news stories. It was originally presented at the JEA/NSPA national journalism convention in San Antonio on November 17, 2012.

Michael Hernandez teaches broadcast journalism at Mira Costa High School in Manhattan Beach, CA. His students produce the Mustang Morning News, a nationally award-winning newscast that can be viewed at www.mustangmorningnews.com.

More great info on sound, journalism and broadcast journalism can be found at www.jeaditigalmedia.org.

Published in: Education

Sound Design for Broadcast Journalism

  1. 1. Sound Designand Recording for Broadcast Journalism 2822 1
  2. 2. Sound Designand Recording for Broadcast JournalismMichael HernandezMira Costa High SchoolManhattan Beach, CAcinehead3@gmail.com@cinehead 2822 2
  3. 3. Heads UpWhy care about sound?Microphones & RecordingSoundbitesNATSVOSound EditingMusic 3
  4. 4. Why Care About Sound? 4
  5. 5. Why Care About Sound? 4
  6. 6. Microphones & Recording 5
  7. 7. Microphones & Recording ClassificationsPower SourcePickup PatternMic Use 5
  8. 8. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Power Source 6
  9. 9. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Power Source Dynamic: does not need batteries. Tends to be rugged. Condenser: uses battery to amplify signal. Higher quality signal. 6
  10. 10. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Pickup Pattern 7
  11. 11. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Pickup Pattern Omni-directional: sensitive to sounds from all directions. 7
  12. 12. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Pickup Pattern Omni-directional: sensitive to sounds from all directions. 7
  13. 13. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Pickup Pattern 8
  14. 14. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Pickup Pattern Uni-directional: sensitive to sounds from one direction. 8
  15. 15. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Pickup Pattern Uni-directional: sensitive to sounds from one direction. “Cardioid” 8
  16. 16. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Pickup Pattern Uni-directional: sensitive to sounds from one direction. “Cardioid” 8
  17. 17. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Pickup Pattern Uni-directional: sensitive to sounds from one direction. “Cardioid” “Super-cardioid” 8
  18. 18. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Pickup Pattern Uni-directional: sensitive to sounds from one direction. “Cardioid” “Super-cardioid” 8
  19. 19. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic Use 9
  20. 20. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic Use Hand-held Lavalier Shotgun 9
  21. 21. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic Use 10
  22. 22. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic UseHand-held: usuallydynamic, cardioid 10
  23. 23. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic UseHand-held: usuallydynamic, cardioid 11
  24. 24. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic UseHand-held: usuallydynamic, cardioid 12
  25. 25. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic Use 13
  26. 26. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic UseLavalier: condenser,usually omni-directional 13
  27. 27. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic UseLavalier: condenser,usually omni-directional 14
  28. 28. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic UseLavalier: condenser,usually omni-directional 15
  29. 29. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic Use 16
  30. 30. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic UseShotgun: condenser,super-cardioid 16
  31. 31. Microphones & RecordingClassifications Mic UseShotgun: dynamic,super-cardioid windsock 17
  32. 32. Uses of Sound Noise vs. Sound 18
  33. 33. Uses of Sound Noise vs. SoundNoise: Unwanted orunintentional sound elementsExamples: phone ringing, caralarms, planes flying overhead,hum from a bad cable, etc. 18
  34. 34. Uses of Sound Noise vs. Sound 19
  35. 35. Uses of Sound Noise vs. SoundSound: sound elementsintentionally recorded orincluded in soundtrackExamples:VO, soundbites,NATS, etc. 19
  36. 36. Sound Recording Volume vs. Level 20
  37. 37. Sound Recording Volume vs. LevelVolume: Loudness.What you hear throughspeakers and headphones.Adjustable. 20
  38. 38. Sound Recording Volume vs. LevelVolume: Loudness.What you hear through Level: Signal strength.speakers and headphones. Permanent once recorded.Adjustable. 20
  39. 39. Sound Recording 21
  40. 40. Sound Recording VU Meter Measures the level.Shown in decibles (dB) or percentage of modulation (0-100%) Peak levels should not go above 0dB 21
  41. 41. Sound Recording 22
  42. 42. Sound Recording OvermodulationLevel is too strong to be recorded accurately Results in distortion of the signal 22
  43. 43. Sound Recording 23
  44. 44. Sound Recording 23
  45. 45. Soundbites and Interviews The three C’sColorfulClearConcise 24
  46. 46. The three C’s What you wantsubjective opinionsexpert opinionsonly this person could say itdon’t use facts 25
  47. 47. The three C’s How to get themrephrase soundbite“in a nutshell”“rephrase in one sentence...”“what are the two most important...” 26
  48. 48. NATS Natural Soundshow, don’t tellsay it, show itwhat is it like to be there?What does it feel like? 27
  49. 49. “Sirens blend with interstate traffic and a cold february wind. A crying girl talks onher cell phone and police radios squawk.” 28
  50. 50. KUSA 2012 29
  51. 51. Editing Soundpunctuationsplit sentences into phrasesgood levelsducking and keyframingsplit edits 30
  52. 52. WAVY 2012 31
  53. 53. Music Why ?add emotiondidn’t record NATSfix audio problems“It’s what the pros do.” 32
  54. 54. Music Why Not?manipulativesubjectivehyperboleviolates copyright law 33
  55. 55. Music How to do it rightbe a better sound editoruse music from NATScreative commons license 34
  56. 56. Sound Designand Recording for Broadcast JournalismMichael HernandezMira Costa High SchoolManhattan Beach, CAcinehead3@gmail.com@cinehead 2822 35
  57. 57. 36
  58. 58. 36
  59. 59. 37
  60. 60. 37

×