Learning by Design: Constructing knowledge through design inquiry around  educational game development Andrew Middleton Ri...
Session outline <ul><li>Introduction  </li></ul><ul><li>Design activity </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion </li></ul>To develop ...
About the  Creative Development Team
Background <ul><li>Content design  </li></ul><ul><li>Changing roles </li></ul><ul><li>Active learning  </li></ul><ul><li>E...
Facilitation model Clients Academic staff Developer companies Students Liaison Group Educational Developers Learning Facil...
Summary of outcomes <ul><li>Student commitment to authenticity of design process </li></ul><ul><li>Student developers gain...
Design-based learning Design based learning involves applying, extrapolating, integrating and synthesising knowledge (Perr...
Design-based learning The  sciences  value objectivity, rationality, neutrality, and a concern for the &quot;truth:' . . ....
Design-based learning The  natural sciences  are concerned with how things are....  Design , on the other hand, is concern...
Design-based learning Design based learning is learning through applying creativity to solve problems.
Design activity - Scenario Image Credit: Lewis Elementary School, Portland Oregon
Design activity - role definitions <ul><li>Designer </li></ul><ul><li>Ask questions to refine the needs </li></ul><ul><li>...
Discussion <ul><li>Deconstructing design based learning:  What are the benefits?   </li></ul><ul><li>Process or product:  ...
What are the benefits? <ul><li>How does design based learning relate to the following? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Professio...
Process or product? <ul><li>Learning subject-based content through a process of design? </li></ul><ul><li>Learning the pro...
Process or product? &quot;In IL [Inquiry Learning], students learn content  as well as  discipline-specific reasoning skil...
Process or product? <ul><li>Learning subject-based content through a process of design? </li></ul><ul><li>Learning the pro...
Immersion or light touch: Where do you stand? <ul><li>Design-based learning can be: </li></ul><ul><li>Quick interactive in...
Immersion or light touch: Where do you stand? <ul><li>&quot;To implement a problem-solving-through-design   approach, prof...
Immersion or light touch: Where do you stand?
Embedding and integrating: Is it relevant for you? <ul><li>Could you apply design based learning in your subject area? </l...
References <ul><li>Davis, M. (1999) Design Knowledge: Broadening the Content Domain of Art Education.  Arts Education Poli...
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Learning by design: constructing knowledge through design inquiry around educational game development

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A simulation was run by educational developers that matched Visualisation students with academics from across the university in order to explore the potential of digital game-based learning (DGBL). Students acted as 'developer companies' charged with designing educational games for their academic 'clients.' One unexpected outcome was the realisation that the design process itself provided a valuable learning opportunity, requiring creativity in problem solving and discourse in the iterative design negotiations, and so offering a model of networked inquiry. The session will engage participants in discussion in order to develop understanding of the links between creativity, design and inquiry-based learning.

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  • Learning by design: constructing knowledge through design inquiry around educational game development

    1. 1. Learning by Design: Constructing knowledge through design inquiry around educational game development Andrew Middleton Richard Mather Susannah Diamond Learning and IT Services
    2. 2. Session outline <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Design activity </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion </li></ul>To develop shared understanding of the links between creativity, design, and inquiry-based learning
    3. 3. About the Creative Development Team
    4. 4. Background <ul><li>Content design </li></ul><ul><li>Changing roles </li></ul><ul><li>Active learning </li></ul><ul><li>Emerging technologies </li></ul><ul><li>► A design-based learning initiative with academic clients and student developer teams. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Facilitation model Clients Academic staff Developer companies Students Liaison Group Educational Developers Learning Facilitators Tutors Client focus group Students
    6. 6. Summary of outcomes <ul><li>Student commitment to authenticity of design process </li></ul><ul><li>Student developers gained high levels of subject knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Staff considered alternative approaches to teaching. </li></ul><ul><li>► Could design-based learning be of wider interest? </li></ul>
    7. 7. Design-based learning Design based learning involves applying, extrapolating, integrating and synthesising knowledge (Perrenet et al. 1999)
    8. 8. Design-based learning The sciences value objectivity, rationality, neutrality, and a concern for the &quot;truth:' . . . The humanities value subjectivity, imagination, commitment, and a concern for &quot;justice.&quot;. . . Design has its own distinct things to know, ways of knowing them, and ways of finding out about them. (Cross 1983, 221-22, cited in Davis, 1998)
    9. 9. Design-based learning The natural sciences are concerned with how things are.... Design , on the other hand, is concerned with how things ought to be, with devising artifacts to attain goals. (Simon, cited in Davis, 1999)
    10. 10. Design-based learning Design based learning is learning through applying creativity to solve problems.
    11. 11. Design activity - Scenario Image Credit: Lewis Elementary School, Portland Oregon
    12. 12. Design activity - role definitions <ul><li>Designer </li></ul><ul><li>Ask questions to refine the needs </li></ul><ul><li>Provide professional advice </li></ul><ul><li>Client </li></ul><ul><li>Explain your requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Consider your stakeholders </li></ul>
    13. 13. Discussion <ul><li>Deconstructing design based learning: What are the benefits? </li></ul><ul><li>Process or product: Which is important? </li></ul><ul><li>Immersion or light touch: Where do you stand? </li></ul><ul><li>Embedding and integrating: Is it relevant for you? </li></ul>
    14. 14. What are the benefits? <ul><li>How does design based learning relate to the following? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Professionalisation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Activation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Co-operation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Creativity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Integration </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Multidisciplinarity </li></ul></ul></ul>Categories from W ijnen, 2000
    15. 15. Process or product? <ul><li>Learning subject-based content through a process of design? </li></ul><ul><li>Learning the problem-solving professional skills associated with design-based occupations? </li></ul>Do you see the benefits of design based learning as:
    16. 16. Process or product? &quot;In IL [Inquiry Learning], students learn content as well as discipline-specific reasoning skills and practices (often in scientific disciplines) by collaboratively engaging in investigations.&quot; (Hmelo-Silver et al., 2007)
    17. 17. Process or product? <ul><li>Learning subject-based content through a process of design? </li></ul><ul><li>Learning the problem-solving professional skills associated with design-based occupations? </li></ul>Do you see the benefits of design based learning as:
    18. 18. Immersion or light touch: Where do you stand? <ul><li>Design-based learning can be: </li></ul><ul><li>Quick interactive interventions </li></ul><ul><li>Medium length assessed work </li></ul><ul><li>Fundamental to a curriculum </li></ul>
    19. 19. Immersion or light touch: Where do you stand? <ul><li>&quot;To implement a problem-solving-through-design approach, professors should: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>reconceptualize curriculum as problems, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>place students in the role of designers, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>reconfigure classrooms as design studios. &quot; </li></ul></ul><ul><li>(Nelson, 2003) </li></ul>
    20. 20. Immersion or light touch: Where do you stand?
    21. 21. Embedding and integrating: Is it relevant for you? <ul><li>Could you apply design based learning in your subject area? </li></ul>Design based learning is learning through applying creativity to solve problems.
    22. 22. References <ul><li>Davis, M. (1999) Design Knowledge: Broadening the Content Domain of Art Education. Arts Education Policy Review ; 101(2) 27-32 </li></ul><ul><li>Davis, M. (1998) Making a Case for Design-based Learning. Arts Education Policy Review , 100(2), 7-14 </li></ul><ul><li>Hmelo-Silver, D., & Chinn. (2007). Scaffolding and Achievement in Problem-Based and Inquiry Learning: A Response to Kirschner, Sweller, and Clark (2006) Educational Psychologist , 42(2), 99–107 </li></ul><ul><li>Nelson, W.A. (2003) Problem Solving Through Design, New Directions for Teaching and Learning , 95, 39-44 </li></ul><ul><li>Perrenet, J., Bouhuijs, P., & Smits, J. (2000). The Suitability of Problem-based Learning for Engineering Education: theory and practice. Teaching in Higher Education , 5(3), 345 - 358 </li></ul><ul><li>Wijnen, W. (1999) Towards Design-Based Learning . Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Educational Service Centre </li></ul>

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