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Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ 
International Experience & Employability 
Melissa Buerkett-Vivian,...
Trends in International Internships 
Open Doors 2014 
For-Credit Internships or Work 
2010/11** 2011/12 2012/13 
Total Stu...
Gilman Internship Experiences Survey 
• Gilman Scholars for 2013-2014 academic year 
• 144 responses from interns 
• 47 co...
How did you identify and arrange your 
internship abroad? 
4% 1% 
7% 
37% 59% 
Through my institution 
Through a program 
...
Who was most helpful in assisting you 
as you set up your internship abroad? 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Program 
Provider...
In what ways did your home institution 
prepare you for your internship abroad? 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 
0 
79 
59...
How did you utilize your connections and skills 
learned abroad as you seek/sought employment? 
140 
120 
100 
80 
60 
40 ...
Illinois Wesleyan University 
 Small residential liberal 
arts college 
 ~1900 students 
 College of Liberal Arts 
+ Sc...
Pre-Departure Program 
 Pre-2014, 3-hour in-person 
departure 
meeting 
 Spring 2014, self-paced 
Moodle course + 3-hour...
Illinois Wesleyan Nursing 
 IWU Spain Program 
 Island program, originally for general 
education and Hispanic Studies 
...
Nursing Program Results 
 First cohort graduated May 2014; 100% job 
placement 
 No significant difference in nursing ac...
Global Experiences International 
Internships 
Who we are 
 Over 4,000 alumni since 
2001 
 10 Cities in 8 countries 
on...
Phase 1: Pre-Departure Prep 
 Clifton StrengthsFinder Assessment – Top 5 Strengths 
 Individual coaching and advising 
...
Phase 2: Focus on Strengths Abroad 
Orientation to deepen understanding and strategy 
for success 
 Site visits for refl...
An Experiential Approach 
 Orientation – “Where do I stand?” 
 Why did you stand where you did? 
 How does it relate to...
An Experiential Approach 
 Midpoint Workshop – “Your Best” 
 Discuss in small groups, one theme that you feel fits best ...
An Experiential Approach 
 Debriefing Workshop 
 No-lose Model to Career 
Decision Making 
 From Grad to Great – 
Using...
Site Visits for Feedback & Reflection 
 Pick one task and tell me how 
your strengths help you perform 
it. 
 "I used my...
Program Assessment 
 Survey collaboration with Dr. Shane Lopez, leading 
psychologist and author of “Making Hope Happen” ...
Phase 3: Re-Entry Services 
 Career Toolkit 
 Alumni Webinar Series 
 Using LinkedIn to Job Search 
 Leveraging Your I...
Gilman Alumni Re-Entry Resources 
 Webinars/Videos 
 Re-Entry 
 Extending Your Exchange 
Experience 
 Networking Oppor...
Re-Entry at IWU 
 Standard study abroad re-entry program 
 Pre-return and welcome-back emails with resources 
 Welcome ...
Contact Information 
Melissa Buerkett-Vivian, LMHC – melissa@globalexperiences.com 
Academic Internship Director 
Global E...
Career Activities 
Quick activities to help students communicate their 
strengths in interviews, resumes, and conversation...
Activity #1: Meaningful Roles 
Goal: To help students think through roles they have had and how they used their 
strengths...
Activity #2: My Best 
Goal: Students need to own their themes and learn to truly understand the value of them. 
This activ...
Activity #3: Personal Statement of Strength 
Goal: Who am I? This activity helps students answer this question and helps s...
Activity #4: Job Analysis 
Goal: A key to helping students utilize thei talents is to get them to analyze opportunities 
b...
• Encourage students to keep their strengths in mind as they consider taking on new 
roles in the future. Remind them to l...
To help make the most of your time 
abroad—personally, academically, 
professionally—you should set some 
clear goals. 
Th...
Prior to site visit: Contact both employer and intern separately to ask if there is anything specific they 
would like to ...
Update notes for Salesforce (if it needs updating please highlight yellow): 
Supervisor name and contact details: 
Address...
Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International 
Experience and Employability Further Resources 
Reso...
Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability
Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability
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Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability

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In this session, we'll challenge the notion that study abroad is an elitist luxury. We'll focus on how it supplies students with competitive global employability. Through a series of interactive methods, study abroad professionals will reflect on the career-enhancing opportunities available in overseas programs and take away effective strategies to help students identify opportunities abroad that meet their professional goals, maximize their experience, and capitalize on new networks and critical skills that help to create an edge as employable candidates in the job market.

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Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability

  1. 1. Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience & Employability Melissa Buerkett-Vivian, LMHC - Global Experiences, Inc. Shawna Hurley - Gilman International Scholarship Program, IIE Stacey Shimizu - Illinois Wesleyan University CIEE Annual Conference 2014, Baltimore, MD
  2. 2. Trends in International Internships Open Doors 2014 For-Credit Internships or Work 2010/11** 2011/12 2012/13 Total Students 17,536 20,676 20,498 Non-Credit Internships or Work 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 Total Students 8,700 12,758 15,089
  3. 3. Gilman Internship Experiences Survey • Gilman Scholars for 2013-2014 academic year • 144 responses from interns • 47 countries (top 3 countries China, Japan and UK) • 78% participated in program that was a combination of academic study and internship • 29% did not plan to participate in internship before program
  4. 4. How did you identify and arrange your internship abroad? 4% 1% 7% 37% 59% Through my institution Through a program provider Through friends or family connections Through current job or professional connections Other
  5. 5. Who was most helpful in assisting you as you set up your internship abroad? 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Program Provider Advisor Study Abroad Advisor/Staff Faculty Member Friend Other (myself, on-site coordinator) Family 59 50 22 6 5 2
  6. 6. In what ways did your home institution prepare you for your internship abroad? 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 79 59 35 30 21 12 10 8  “As a first generation study abroad student, I really wasn't sure how to prepare for studying abroad. I really depended on my online study abroad advisor who truly went above and beyond helping me get ready for my internship.”
  7. 7. How did you utilize your connections and skills learned abroad as you seek/sought employment? 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Put information regarding my internship on my resume and referenced skills in inteviews Networked and made connections that I have utilized to find a job Found a mentor Other Gained employment with the organization where I interned 126 32 25 18 7
  8. 8. Illinois Wesleyan University  Small residential liberal arts college  ~1900 students  College of Liberal Arts + Schools of Nursing, Theater Arts, Fine Arts and Music  ~50% of students have international experience by graduation
  9. 9. Pre-Departure Program  Pre-2014, 3-hour in-person departure meeting  Spring 2014, self-paced Moodle course + 3-hour meeting  One hour now dedicated to making link between study abroad and career preparations.
  10. 10. Illinois Wesleyan Nursing  IWU Spain Program  Island program, originally for general education and Hispanic Studies  2012, opened to sophomore nursing students  Two required nursing courses (delivered using synchronous learning technology) with attached healthcare observations in local clinics  Complementary language component and workshop on healthcare differences between Spain and the US
  11. 11. Nursing Program Results  First cohort graduated May 2014; 100% job placement  No significant difference in nursing academic performance or GPA between first semester and second semester of sophomore year or between cohort grades, regardless of location  Reports of satisfaction with experience on exit interviews and self-reported sense of increased cultural competence
  12. 12. Global Experiences International Internships Who we are  Over 4,000 alumni since 2001  10 Cities in 8 countries on 4 continents  Mission = "To provide life-changing experiences“  Partnership with Gallup Education since Spring 2013 Why we use Strengths  Develop innovative career development program  Identify how internships abroad positively impact lives  Research shows that knowing and using Strengths leads to success
  13. 13. Phase 1: Pre-Departure Prep  Clifton StrengthsFinder Assessment – Top 5 Strengths  Individual coaching and advising  Résumés and cover letters  Mock interviewing  Professional behavior and etiquette (during the placement process)  Career planning and decision making (choosing a placement)  Career development webinar series  Rocking Your Interview  The Digital You  Your Top 5 Strengths  Using LinkedIn*  Reflections on Language & Culture
  14. 14. Phase 2: Focus on Strengths Abroad Orientation to deepen understanding and strategy for success  Site visits for reflection and employer feedback Midpoint workshop to overcome challenges and enhance professional communication and networking skills Global Connections Networking Debriefing on career decisions and job search skills
  15. 15. An Experiential Approach  Orientation – “Where do I stand?”  Why did you stand where you did?  How does it relate to your Strengths?  What did you learn from observing others’ positions?
  16. 16. An Experiential Approach  Midpoint Workshop – “Your Best”  Discuss in small groups, one theme that you feel fits best and why.  How do you use it in your internship? Past positions?  How does it help you succeed?  Practice presenting your best self to a new professional contact or potential employer
  17. 17. An Experiential Approach  Debriefing Workshop  No-lose Model to Career Decision Making  From Grad to Great – Using Strengths as transferrable skills in résumés, cover letters and interviews  Mock interviews with location coordinators
  18. 18. Site Visits for Feedback & Reflection  Pick one task and tell me how your strengths help you perform it.  "I used my Ideation in the brainstorm meetings, and I have to think Strategically when considering which media companies to contact.”  How have you used your strengths to overcome a challenge at work?  "At first, I wasn’t sure what I could bring to the table. I was nervous about how I would do. Knowing my Strengths helped me have more confidence."
  19. 19. Program Assessment  Survey collaboration with Dr. Shane Lopez, leading psychologist and author of “Making Hope Happen”  107 interns were surveyed online pre- and post-program  3 Measures: Hope, Well-being and Strengths awareness  The results of the exit survey showed:  78% increase in Hope  78% increase in Strengths awareness  86% increase in overall Well-being
  20. 20. Phase 3: Re-Entry Services  Career Toolkit  Alumni Webinar Series  Using LinkedIn to Job Search  Leveraging Your International Experience  Networking  Alumni Panel  Professional Networking  LinkedIn, Facebook, Global Connections  Ambassador Program and the Alumni Assistant Role  Business cards  Recommendations
  21. 21. Gilman Alumni Re-Entry Resources  Webinars/Videos  Re-Entry  Extending Your Exchange Experience  Networking Opportunities  LinkedIn  International Exchange Alumni  Gilman-Fulbright Networking Receptions  Gilman Alumni Ambassador Program (GAAP)
  22. 22. Re-Entry at IWU  Standard study abroad re-entry program  Pre-return and welcome-back emails with resources  Welcome Back reception hosted by university president  Online resources  Invitations throughout year to engage in IO activities and mentor new applicants  Career-specific re-entry  “Bringing It Home” workshop with the Career Center  Nursing-specific re-entry  3-week intensive May Term for clinical training
  23. 23. Contact Information Melissa Buerkett-Vivian, LMHC – melissa@globalexperiences.com Academic Internship Director Global Experiences, Inc. Shawna Hurley– shurley@iie.org Operations Manager, Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program Institute of International Education (IIE) – Houston Stacey Shimizu– sshimizu@iwu.edu Director, International Office Illinois Wesleyan University
  24. 24. Career Activities Quick activities to help students communicate their strengths in interviews, resumes, and conversations. The Gallup Organization Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  25. 25. Activity #1: Meaningful Roles Goal: To help students think through roles they have had and how they used their strengths within those roles. This activity works best when students gather in groups of three or four to discuss their findings. You may want to provide your own example so they can understand how their strengths can relate their own successes. 1. Have students list three of the most meaningful and important jobs, leadership roles, or volunteer positions they have held. For each, have them describe five responsibilities or outcomes they achieved in those roles. 2. For each outcome ask them to write the Clifton StrengthsFinder theme or themes that they utilized to help them be successful in achieving the outcome. 3. In any interview it is important for candidates to verbalize and give detailed information about what they have done in their past roles. Ask each student to take one of their outcomes and come up with a specific example of how they achieved that success. Students must “sell themselves” by using each of the themes they listed to describe exactly how they achieved their success. Additional Ideas: • The best interview responses are specific; they clearly state what the person has done and how they did it. Using strengths can help them paint a picture of who they are and what they are good at. • Examples will help tremendously, so if there is time, walk through one or more with your students to give them good models from which to learn. • To provide even more examples, after students have discussed their successes in their small groups, have a few students share their achievements with the larger group. • Feedback is important. Try to help the lesson set in by giving them feedback and getting them to be more specific about how they can use their strengths to describe what they do and how they do it. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  26. 26. Activity #2: My Best Goal: Students need to own their themes and learn to truly understand the value of them. This activity helps them analyze when and how they have used a particular theme to be successful. This activity works best when students gather in groups of three or four to discuss their findings. You may want to provide your own example so they can understand how their strengths can relate their own successes. 1. Have each student choose one theme that they feel fits theme best. Have them answer the following questions in their small groups. a. What is best about this theme? b. How do you use it in your school work? c. How do you use it in jobs or other positions you have held? d. What would happen if you didn’t have this theme? e. How does this theme help you be successful? 2. After each student has shared their responses, give them five minutes to prepare themselves to “sell” these talents as something an employer would want and could benefit from. They will have 2 minutes to present in the small or larger group. Additional Ideas: • Think about more questions for the students to discuss. If you have a specific topic, role, or career you are focusing on, additional questions may help them bring more focus to this activity. • Prepare your own example to show them how you can sell yourself. • Consider providing a specific job or project they must have in mind when selling their strengths. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  27. 27. Activity #3: Personal Statement of Strength Goal: Who am I? This activity helps students answer this question and helps students pull all of their themes together. It can help them to take ownership for the themes and begin to see how to use strengths as a language to describe themselves. Using their top five themes students write one to two paragraphs about themselves. Their goal is to combine their themes in a way that tells a story about who they are and what is best about them. Students can be as creative as they want. The goal is to get them to start talking about themselves using the language of strengths. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  28. 28. Activity #4: Job Analysis Goal: A key to helping students utilize thei talents is to get them to analyze opportunities based on what they do best. The goal for this activity is to put some real positions in front of them to see how their strengths fit that role. You will need to have two or three job descriptions either from your own organization or a job board like Monster.com. Or, feel free to write your own description. This could be a job, a volunteer project, or a leadership opportunity. The descriptions should be fairly detailed in order to show the outcomes and the responsibilities of the position. The job analysis can be discussed in small or large groups. 1. Have the students read through the descriptions one position at a time. 2. For each of the outcomes or responsibilities listed for the job, ask them to look at their themes and write beside each of them the theme or themes that would help them achieve the success described for each statement. Make it clear that not all of the outcomes or responsibilites may fit them, so there may not be themes written on some statements. Depending on time, students can do this activity for one or more job descriptions. 3. Next, ask students to consider the answers to these questions in order to think through their fit for the role: a. Would most of my strengths be utilized in this role? b. Are there some strengths that wouldn’t get much use if I took a role like this? What are they and how would that make me feel? c. Are there some things in this position that would be difficult for me to do? d. How well would this position fit me? e. What things would I like to have added to this if I could? f. What parts of the role do not fit? g. How would I feel in this type of a role? 4. In a group, talk about finding a role that fits you and your strengths. Talk about your experience in roles that may not have fit you very well and what that was like. Encourage students to do this with leadership positions, jobs, internships, or projects in which they plan to play a role. Additional Ideas: • There are no right or wrong answers to these questions — let students know that. You may even use yourself as an example to show that not everything in a role may fit you perfectly, but that it is very important to get into roles that best utilize your strengths.You may even talk about roles that didn’t fit you and why. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  29. 29. • Encourage students to keep their strengths in mind as they consider taking on new roles in the future. Remind them to look every role and analyze it based on their strengths. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  30. 30. To help make the most of your time abroad—personally, academically, professionally—you should set some clear goals. The best goals are SMART: Specific — "I plan to join a student club at the local university so that I can meet local students," rather than, "Make friends." Measurable — "I want to experience/learn something new (try a new food, learn a new word, see a new museum) about my host culture each day," rather than, "Learn about my host culture." Attainable — "I want to gain hand-on research skills through my field study class." Realistic — "I want to be able to hold a conversation in Spanish with someone I have just met," rather than, "Become fluent in Spanish." Time-bound — "By the middle of the semester, I want to have planned and booked my own trip to another country." And remember that deadlines are sometimes a good thing. To help you get started, here is a template you can use as you prepare for your semester abroad. Though it talks about career goals, it can be repeated to set personal, academic, or other goals. List three (3) career-related goals for your time abroad. Ex. I want to learn more about teaching English abroad. 1. 2. 3. Now, list three (3) concrete actions to take now or while abroad to help you reach your goals. Ex. I will talk with my program to see if there is some way I can volunteer as a language tutor. 1. 2. 3.
  31. 31. Prior to site visit: Contact both employer and intern separately to ask if there is anything specific they would like to discuss or get out of the meeting. Remind the intern that the site visit is for them – to help them get professional feedback and to ensure the rest of their internship is as great as it can be. Site visit recording form Company: Supervisor name: Intern name: Date: GE representative: Introduction: explain purpose of the meeting and that the questions are designed to help the intern reflect on their experience in a way that they might present it to future employers. Encourage intern and supervisor to create a discussion around each answer. NB. It might be appropriate to have 2 minutes with the supervisor and intern separately first, especially if there are known issues. Questions posed to intern, but encourage supervisor to input their thoughts too: 1. Tell me about your experience so far and some of the projects/tasks you’ve been working on. • 2. Thinking about your responsibilities, what are the three most important aspects of your role? • 3. Pick one of these responsibilities and tell me how your strengths help you perform it. • 4. To employer: What strengths have you seen the intern use during the internship so far? • 5. To intern again: Who do you partner with in your role? What strengths or talents do they have? • 6. What’s been the highlight of your internship so far (ie. What do you enjoy most)? What do you enjoy the least? • 7. Have you had to overcome any challenges at work so far? If so, how have you used your strengths to do this? • 8. What are some things you’ve learned as a result of your internship and how has this better prepared you for your future? • 9. To both: What goals do you have for the rest of the internship? • 10. To both: Is there anything we could do to better to prepare you both for this experience? • 11. To employer: Does your organization have additional needs for other interns? Do you have friends or colleagues who would benefit from having an intern? •
  32. 32. Update notes for Salesforce (if it needs updating please highlight yellow): Supervisor name and contact details: Address of internship: Skills/experience required (“ideal candidate” description for website): Key internship tasks: 1. 2. 3. Number of interns required at a time: *****Don’t forget to take a photo!*****
  33. 33. Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability Further Resources Resources CIEE Annual Conference 2014 | FURTHER RESOURCES  British Council, Ipsos Public Affairs, and Booz Allen Hamilton (2013). Culture at Work: The value of intercultural skills in the workplace. Retrieved from http://www.britishcouncil.org/sites/britishcouncil.uk2/files/culture-at-work- report.pdf  Gardner, Gross, & Steglitz. (2008). Unpacking Your Study Abroad Experience: Critical Reflection for Workplace Competencies. Collegiate Employment Research Institute Research Brief, 1 (1). Retrieved from http://ceri.msu.edu/publications/pdf/brief1-2008final.pdf  Gilman Scholarship Program Web Symposium. Career-Oriented Internship Opportunities. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/Programs/Gilman-Scholarship-Program/News-and-Social-Media/Videos/WS-International- Internships Working Together, Working Abroad. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/Programs/Gilman-Scholarship-Program/News-and-Social-Media/Videos/WS-Working- Together-Working-Abroad  Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. (2012). Tippie Roadmap Skills Inventory. http://tippie.uiowa.edu/undergraduate/roadmap/skills-inventory.cfm  Kuh, G. (2008). High-Impact Educational Practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Association of American Colleges and Universities. Retrieved from http://www.neasc.org/downloads/aacu_high_impact_2008_final.pdf  Levinger, Morrison, & Jouannelle. (2011). Beyond "It was awesome!” Enriching the Student Experience after Re-entry. CIEE Annual Conference 2011, New Orleans. Retrieved from http://www.ciee.org/conference/downloads/past/new-orleans/skills_survey.pdf.  NAFSA Association of International Educators. (2014). Study Abroad Career Plan: A Guide for Advising Students. Retrieved from http://www.nafsa.org/Find_Resources/Supporting_Study_Abroad/Network_Resources/Education_Abroad /Study_Abroad_Career_Plan__A_Guide_for_Advising_Students/  NAFSA Association of International Educators. (2013). Subcommittee on Work, Internships and Volunteering Abroad (WIVA) – Resource Library. Retrieved from http://www.nafsa.org/resourcelibrary/default.aspx?catId=429109  School for International Training. (2008). After Study Abroad: A toolkit for returning students. Retrieved from http://www.worldlearning.org/linkservid/056F078A-EDEB-BEAE-FD0050C1F1E0F368/showMeta/0/  Tillman, M. (2011). AIFS Student Guide to Study Abroad & Career Development. Retrieved from http://www.aifsabroad.com/advisors/pdf/Tillman_AIFS_Student_Guide_Career.pdf  Tillman, M. (2014). Campus Best Practices: Supporting Education Abroad & Student Career Development. Retrieved from http://www.aifsabroad.com/advisors/pdf/Tillman_Best_Practices.pdf  University of Texas at Austin, Center for International Business Education & Research (CIBER). Planning for Study Abroad with Recruiting and Your Career in Mind. PDF Retrieved from http://www.mccombs.utexas.edu/Centers/CIBER/Summer/~/media/Files/MSB/Centers/CIBER/Study%20A broad%20and%20Career/Planning%20for%20Study%20Abroad.ashx

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