SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 35
Download to read offline
Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ 
International Experience & Employability 
Melissa Buerkett-Vivian, LMHC - Global Experiences, Inc. 
Shawna Hurley - Gilman International Scholarship Program, IIE 
Stacey Shimizu - Illinois Wesleyan University 
CIEE Annual Conference 2014, Baltimore, MD
Trends in International Internships 
Open Doors 2014 
For-Credit Internships or Work 
2010/11** 2011/12 2012/13 
Total Students 17,536 20,676 20,498 
Non-Credit Internships or Work 
2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 
Total Students 8,700 12,758 15,089
Gilman Internship Experiences Survey 
• Gilman Scholars for 2013-2014 academic year 
• 144 responses from interns 
• 47 countries (top 3 countries China, Japan and UK) 
• 78% participated in program that was a combination of academic 
study and internship 
• 29% did not plan to participate in internship before program
How did you identify and arrange your 
internship abroad? 
4% 1% 
7% 
37% 59% 
Through my institution 
Through a program 
provider 
Through friends or family 
connections 
Through current job or 
professional connections 
Other
Who was most helpful in assisting you 
as you set up your internship abroad? 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Program 
Provider 
Advisor 
Study Abroad 
Advisor/Staff 
Faculty Member Friend Other (myself, 
on-site 
coordinator) 
Family 
59 
50 
22 
6 5 
2
In what ways did your home institution 
prepare you for your internship abroad? 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 
0 
79 
59 
35 
30 
21 
12 10 8 
 “As a first generation study abroad student, I really wasn't sure how to prepare for studying abroad. I really 
depended on my online study abroad advisor who truly went above and beyond helping me get ready for my 
internship.”
How did you utilize your connections and skills 
learned abroad as you seek/sought employment? 
140 
120 
100 
80 
60 
40 
20 
0 
Put information 
regarding my 
internship on my 
resume and 
referenced skills in 
inteviews 
Networked and 
made connections 
that I have utilized 
to find a job 
Found a mentor Other Gained 
employment with 
the organization 
where I interned 
126 
32 
25 18 
7
Illinois Wesleyan University 
 Small residential liberal 
arts college 
 ~1900 students 
 College of Liberal Arts 
+ Schools of Nursing, 
Theater Arts, Fine Arts 
and Music 
 ~50% of students have 
international experience 
by graduation
Pre-Departure Program 
 Pre-2014, 3-hour in-person 
departure 
meeting 
 Spring 2014, self-paced 
Moodle course + 3-hour 
meeting 
 One hour now dedicated 
to making link between 
study abroad and career 
preparations.
Illinois Wesleyan Nursing 
 IWU Spain Program 
 Island program, originally for general 
education and Hispanic Studies 
 2012, opened to sophomore nursing 
students 
 Two required nursing courses (delivered 
using synchronous learning technology) 
with attached healthcare observations in 
local clinics 
 Complementary language component 
and workshop on healthcare differences 
between Spain and the US
Nursing Program Results 
 First cohort graduated May 2014; 100% job 
placement 
 No significant difference in nursing academic 
performance or GPA between first semester and 
second semester of sophomore year or between 
cohort grades, regardless of location 
 Reports of satisfaction with experience on exit 
interviews and self-reported sense of increased 
cultural competence
Global Experiences International 
Internships 
Who we are 
 Over 4,000 alumni since 
2001 
 10 Cities in 8 countries 
on 4 continents 
 Mission = "To provide 
life-changing 
experiences“ 
 Partnership with Gallup 
Education since Spring 
2013 
Why we use Strengths 
 Develop innovative career 
development program 
 Identify how internships 
abroad positively impact 
lives 
 Research shows that 
knowing and using 
Strengths leads to success
Phase 1: Pre-Departure Prep 
 Clifton StrengthsFinder Assessment – Top 5 Strengths 
 Individual coaching and advising 
 Résumés and cover letters 
 Mock interviewing 
 Professional behavior and etiquette (during the placement process) 
 Career planning and decision making (choosing a placement) 
 Career development webinar series 
 Rocking Your Interview 
 The Digital You 
 Your Top 5 Strengths 
 Using LinkedIn* 
 Reflections on Language & Culture
Phase 2: Focus on Strengths Abroad 
Orientation to deepen understanding and strategy 
for success 
 Site visits for reflection and employer feedback 
Midpoint workshop to overcome challenges and 
enhance professional communication and 
networking skills 
Global Connections Networking 
Debriefing on career decisions 
and job search skills
An Experiential Approach 
 Orientation – “Where do I stand?” 
 Why did you stand where you did? 
 How does it relate to your Strengths? 
 What did you learn from observing others’ positions?
An Experiential Approach 
 Midpoint Workshop – “Your Best” 
 Discuss in small groups, one theme that you feel fits best 
and why. 
 How do you use it in your internship? Past positions? 
 How does it help you succeed? 
 Practice presenting your best self to a new professional 
contact or potential employer
An Experiential Approach 
 Debriefing Workshop 
 No-lose Model to Career 
Decision Making 
 From Grad to Great – 
Using Strengths as 
transferrable skills in 
résumés, cover letters and 
interviews 
 Mock interviews with 
location coordinators
Site Visits for Feedback & Reflection 
 Pick one task and tell me how 
your strengths help you perform 
it. 
 "I used my Ideation in the 
brainstorm meetings, and I have 
to think Strategically when 
considering which media 
companies to contact.” 
 How have you used your 
strengths to overcome a 
challenge at work? 
 "At first, I wasn’t sure what I could 
bring to the table. I was nervous 
about how I would do. Knowing 
my Strengths helped me have 
more confidence."
Program Assessment 
 Survey collaboration with Dr. Shane Lopez, leading 
psychologist and author of “Making Hope Happen” 
 107 interns were surveyed online pre- and post-program 
 3 Measures: Hope, Well-being and Strengths 
awareness 
 The results of the exit survey showed: 
 78% increase in Hope 
 78% increase in Strengths awareness 
 86% increase in overall Well-being
Phase 3: Re-Entry Services 
 Career Toolkit 
 Alumni Webinar Series 
 Using LinkedIn to Job Search 
 Leveraging Your International Experience 
 Networking 
 Alumni Panel 
 Professional Networking 
 LinkedIn, Facebook, Global Connections 
 Ambassador Program and the Alumni 
Assistant Role 
 Business cards 
 Recommendations
Gilman Alumni Re-Entry Resources 
 Webinars/Videos 
 Re-Entry 
 Extending Your Exchange 
Experience 
 Networking Opportunities 
 LinkedIn 
 International Exchange 
Alumni 
 Gilman-Fulbright Networking 
Receptions 
 Gilman Alumni Ambassador 
Program (GAAP)
Re-Entry at IWU 
 Standard study abroad re-entry program 
 Pre-return and welcome-back emails with resources 
 Welcome Back reception hosted by university president 
 Online resources 
 Invitations throughout year to engage in IO activities and 
mentor new applicants 
 Career-specific re-entry 
 “Bringing It Home” 
workshop with the Career 
Center 
 Nursing-specific re-entry 
 3-week intensive May Term 
for clinical training
Contact Information 
Melissa Buerkett-Vivian, LMHC – melissa@globalexperiences.com 
Academic Internship Director 
Global Experiences, Inc. 
Shawna Hurley– shurley@iie.org 
Operations Manager, Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program 
Institute of International Education (IIE) – Houston 
Stacey Shimizu– sshimizu@iwu.edu 
Director, International Office 
Illinois Wesleyan University
Career Activities 
Quick activities to help students communicate their 
strengths in interviews, resumes, and conversations. 
The Gallup Organization 
Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, 
Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
Activity #1: Meaningful Roles 
Goal: To help students think through roles they have had and how they used their 
strengths within those roles. 
This activity works best when students gather in groups of three or four to discuss their 
findings. You may want to provide your own example so they can understand how their 
strengths can relate their own successes. 
1. Have students list three of the most meaningful and important jobs, leadership 
roles, or volunteer positions they have held. For each, have them describe five 
responsibilities or outcomes they achieved in those roles. 
2. For each outcome ask them to write the Clifton StrengthsFinder theme or themes 
that they utilized to help them be successful in achieving the outcome. 
3. In any interview it is important for candidates to verbalize and give detailed 
information about what they have done in their past roles. Ask each student to 
take one of their outcomes and come up with a specific example of how they 
achieved that success. Students must “sell themselves” by using each of the 
themes they listed to describe exactly how they achieved their success. 
Additional Ideas: 
• The best interview responses are specific; they clearly state what the 
person has done and how they did it. Using strengths can help them paint a 
picture of who they are and what they are good at. 
• Examples will help tremendously, so if there is time, walk through one or 
more with your students to give them good models from which to learn. 
• To provide even more examples, after students have discussed their 
successes in their small groups, have a few students share their 
achievements with the larger group. 
• Feedback is important. Try to help the lesson set in by giving them 
feedback and getting them to be more specific about how they can use 
their strengths to describe what they do and how they do it. 
Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, 
Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
Activity #2: My Best 
Goal: Students need to own their themes and learn to truly understand the value of them. 
This activity helps them analyze when and how they have used a particular theme to be 
successful. 
This activity works best when students gather in groups of three or four to discuss their 
findings. You may want to provide your own example so they can understand how their 
strengths can relate their own successes. 
1. Have each student choose one theme that they feel fits theme best. Have them 
answer the following questions in their small groups. 
a. What is best about this theme? 
b. How do you use it in your school work? 
c. How do you use it in jobs or other positions you have held? 
d. What would happen if you didn’t have this theme? 
e. How does this theme help you be successful? 
2. After each student has shared their responses, give them five minutes to prepare 
themselves to “sell” these talents as something an employer would want and could 
benefit from. They will have 2 minutes to present in the small or larger group. 
Additional Ideas: 
• Think about more questions for the students to discuss. If you have a specific 
topic, role, or career you are focusing on, additional questions may help them 
bring more focus to this activity. 
• Prepare your own example to show them how you can sell yourself. 
• Consider providing a specific job or project they must have in mind when selling 
their strengths. 
Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, 
Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
Activity #3: Personal Statement of Strength 
Goal: Who am I? This activity helps students answer this question and helps students 
pull all of their themes together. It can help them to take ownership for the themes and 
begin to see how to use strengths as a language to describe themselves. 
Using their top five themes students write one to two paragraphs about themselves. Their 
goal is to combine their themes in a way that tells a story about who they are and what is 
best about them. Students can be as creative as they want. The goal is to get them to start 
talking about themselves using the language of strengths. 
Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, 
Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
Activity #4: Job Analysis 
Goal: A key to helping students utilize thei talents is to get them to analyze opportunities 
based on what they do best. The goal for this activity is to put some real positions in front 
of them to see how their strengths fit that role. 
You will need to have two or three job descriptions either from your own organization or 
a job board like Monster.com. Or, feel free to write your own description. This could be a 
job, a volunteer project, or a leadership opportunity. The descriptions should be fairly 
detailed in order to show the outcomes and the responsibilities of the position. 
The job analysis can be discussed in small or large groups. 
1. Have the students read through the descriptions one position at a time. 
2. For each of the outcomes or responsibilities listed for the job, ask them to look at 
their themes and write beside each of them the theme or themes that would help 
them achieve the success described for each statement. Make it clear that not all 
of the outcomes or responsibilites may fit them, so there may not be themes 
written on some statements. Depending on time, students can do this activity for 
one or more job descriptions. 
3. Next, ask students to consider the answers to these questions in order to think 
through their fit for the role: 
a. Would most of my strengths be utilized in this role? 
b. Are there some strengths that wouldn’t get much use if I took a role like 
this? What are they and how would that make me feel? 
c. Are there some things in this position that would be difficult for me to do? 
d. How well would this position fit me? 
e. What things would I like to have added to this if I could? 
f. What parts of the role do not fit? 
g. How would I feel in this type of a role? 
4. In a group, talk about finding a role that fits you and your strengths. Talk about 
your experience in roles that may not have fit you very well and what that was 
like. Encourage students to do this with leadership positions, jobs, internships, or 
projects in which they plan to play a role. 
Additional Ideas: 
• There are no right or wrong answers to these questions — let students know that. 
You may even use yourself as an example to show that not everything in a role 
may fit you perfectly, but that it is very important to get into roles that best utilize 
your strengths.You may even talk about roles that didn’t fit you and why. 
Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, 
Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
• Encourage students to keep their strengths in mind as they consider taking on new 
roles in the future. Remind them to look every role and analyze it based on their 
strengths. 
Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, 
Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
To help make the most of your time 
abroad—personally, academically, 
professionally—you should set some 
clear goals. 
The best goals are SMART: 
Specific — "I plan to join a student club at 
the local university so that I can 
meet local students," rather than, "Make friends." 
Measurable — "I want to experience/learn something new (try a new food, learn a new word, see a 
new museum) about my host culture each day," rather than, "Learn about my host culture." 
Attainable — "I want to gain hand-on research skills through my field study class." 
Realistic — "I want to be able to hold a conversation in Spanish with someone I have just met," 
rather than, "Become fluent in Spanish." 
Time-bound — "By the middle of the semester, I want to have planned and booked my own trip to 
another country." 
And remember that deadlines are sometimes a good thing. 
To help you get started, here is a template you can use as you prepare for your semester abroad. 
Though it talks about career goals, it can be repeated to set personal, academic, or other goals. 
List three (3) career-related goals for your time abroad. 
Ex. I want to learn more about teaching English abroad. 
1. 
2. 
3. 
Now, list three (3) concrete actions to take now or while abroad to help you reach your goals. 
Ex. I will talk with my program to see if there is some way I can volunteer as a language tutor. 
1. 
2. 
3.
Prior to site visit: Contact both employer and intern separately to ask if there is anything specific they 
would like to discuss or get out of the meeting. Remind the intern that the site visit is for them – to help 
them get professional feedback and to ensure the rest of their internship is as great as it can be. 
Site visit recording form 
Company: 
Supervisor name: 
Intern name: 
Date: 
GE representative: 
Introduction: explain purpose of the meeting and that the questions are designed to help the intern reflect 
on their experience in a way that they might present it to future employers. Encourage intern and 
supervisor to create a discussion around each answer. 
NB. It might be appropriate to have 2 minutes with the supervisor and intern separately first, especially if 
there are known issues. 
Questions posed to intern, but encourage supervisor to input their thoughts too: 
1. Tell me about your experience so far and some of the projects/tasks you’ve been working on. 
• 
2. Thinking about your responsibilities, what are the three most important aspects of your role? 
• 
3. Pick one of these responsibilities and tell me how your strengths help you perform it. 
• 
4. To employer: What strengths have you seen the intern use during the internship so far? 
• 
5. To intern again: Who do you partner with in your role? What strengths or talents do they have? 
• 
6. What’s been the highlight of your internship so far (ie. What do you enjoy most)? What do you 
enjoy the least? 
• 
7. Have you had to overcome any challenges at work so far? If so, how have you used your strengths 
to do this? 
• 
8. What are some things you’ve learned as a result of your internship and how has this better 
prepared you for your future? 
• 
9. To both: What goals do you have for the rest of the internship? 
• 
10. To both: Is there anything we could do to better to prepare you both for this experience? 
• 
11. To employer: Does your organization have additional needs for other interns? Do you have friends 
or colleagues who would benefit from having an intern? 
•
Update notes for Salesforce (if it needs updating please highlight yellow): 
Supervisor name and contact details: 
Address of internship: 
Skills/experience required (“ideal candidate” description for website): 
Key internship tasks: 
1. 
2. 
3. 
Number of interns required at a time: 
*****Don’t forget to take a photo!*****
Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International 
Experience and Employability Further Resources 
Resources 
CIEE Annual Conference 2014 | 
FURTHER RESOURCES 
 British Council, Ipsos Public Affairs, and Booz Allen Hamilton (2013). Culture at Work: The value of intercultural 
skills in the workplace. Retrieved from http://www.britishcouncil.org/sites/britishcouncil.uk2/files/culture-at-work- 
report.pdf 
 Gardner, Gross, & Steglitz. (2008). Unpacking Your Study Abroad Experience: Critical Reflection for Workplace 
Competencies. Collegiate Employment Research Institute Research Brief, 1 (1). Retrieved 
from http://ceri.msu.edu/publications/pdf/brief1-2008final.pdf 
 Gilman Scholarship Program Web Symposium. Career-Oriented Internship Opportunities. Retrieved 
from http://www.iie.org/Programs/Gilman-Scholarship-Program/News-and-Social-Media/Videos/WS-International- 
Internships Working Together, Working Abroad. Retrieved 
from http://www.iie.org/Programs/Gilman-Scholarship-Program/News-and-Social-Media/Videos/WS-Working- 
Together-Working-Abroad 
 Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. (2012). Tippie Roadmap Skills 
Inventory. http://tippie.uiowa.edu/undergraduate/roadmap/skills-inventory.cfm 
 Kuh, G. (2008). High-Impact Educational Practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. 
Association of American Colleges and Universities. Retrieved 
from http://www.neasc.org/downloads/aacu_high_impact_2008_final.pdf 
 Levinger, Morrison, & Jouannelle. (2011). Beyond "It was awesome!” Enriching the Student Experience after Re-entry. 
CIEE Annual Conference 2011, New Orleans. Retrieved from 
http://www.ciee.org/conference/downloads/past/new-orleans/skills_survey.pdf. 
 NAFSA Association of International Educators. (2014). Study Abroad Career Plan: A Guide for Advising Students. 
Retrieved 
from http://www.nafsa.org/Find_Resources/Supporting_Study_Abroad/Network_Resources/Education_Abroad 
/Study_Abroad_Career_Plan__A_Guide_for_Advising_Students/ 
 NAFSA Association of International Educators. (2013). Subcommittee on Work, Internships and Volunteering 
Abroad (WIVA) – Resource Library. Retrieved 
from http://www.nafsa.org/resourcelibrary/default.aspx?catId=429109 
 School for International Training. (2008). After Study Abroad: A toolkit for returning students. Retrieved 
from http://www.worldlearning.org/linkservid/056F078A-EDEB-BEAE-FD0050C1F1E0F368/showMeta/0/ 
 Tillman, M. (2011). AIFS Student Guide to Study Abroad & Career Development. Retrieved 
from http://www.aifsabroad.com/advisors/pdf/Tillman_AIFS_Student_Guide_Career.pdf 
 Tillman, M. (2014). Campus Best Practices: Supporting Education Abroad & Student Career Development. 
Retrieved from http://www.aifsabroad.com/advisors/pdf/Tillman_Best_Practices.pdf 
 University of Texas at Austin, Center for International Business Education & Research (CIBER). Planning for Study 
Abroad with Recruiting and Your Career in Mind. PDF Retrieved 
from http://www.mccombs.utexas.edu/Centers/CIBER/Summer/~/media/Files/MSB/Centers/CIBER/Study%20A 
broad%20and%20Career/Planning%20for%20Study%20Abroad.ashx

More Related Content

What's hot

Meet Me at the Table: The lived experience of weekly virtual seminars in a b...
 Meet Me at the Table: The lived experience of weekly virtual seminars in a b... Meet Me at the Table: The lived experience of weekly virtual seminars in a b...
Meet Me at the Table: The lived experience of weekly virtual seminars in a b...
BCcampus
 
Peer Leader Manual 2013-2014
Peer Leader Manual 2013-2014Peer Leader Manual 2013-2014
Peer Leader Manual 2013-2014
Cedric Steele
 
Actively engaging student in large classes
Actively engaging student in large classesActively engaging student in large classes
Actively engaging student in large classes
Dr Lendy Spires
 
How can mentoring and a programme like this support the challenges that we fa...
How can mentoring and a programme like this support the challenges that we fa...How can mentoring and a programme like this support the challenges that we fa...
How can mentoring and a programme like this support the challenges that we fa...
Association of University Administrators
 

What's hot (20)

Towards increasing interprofessional learning - Mehigan and Taylor
Towards increasing interprofessional learning - Mehigan and TaylorTowards increasing interprofessional learning - Mehigan and Taylor
Towards increasing interprofessional learning - Mehigan and Taylor
 
Meet Me at the Table: The lived experience of weekly virtual seminars in a b...
 Meet Me at the Table: The lived experience of weekly virtual seminars in a b... Meet Me at the Table: The lived experience of weekly virtual seminars in a b...
Meet Me at the Table: The lived experience of weekly virtual seminars in a b...
 
FAPSC 2013 Annual Conference Presentation: Connecting with Online Students
FAPSC 2013 Annual Conference Presentation: Connecting with Online StudentsFAPSC 2013 Annual Conference Presentation: Connecting with Online Students
FAPSC 2013 Annual Conference Presentation: Connecting with Online Students
 
Peer Leader Manual 2013-2014
Peer Leader Manual 2013-2014Peer Leader Manual 2013-2014
Peer Leader Manual 2013-2014
 
Surviving a Change Management Project - Loretta Gibson, University of Bath
Surviving a Change Management Project - Loretta Gibson, University of BathSurviving a Change Management Project - Loretta Gibson, University of Bath
Surviving a Change Management Project - Loretta Gibson, University of Bath
 
Leveraging Early-Alert Programs to Foster Cross-Campus Collaborations Aimed a...
Leveraging Early-Alert Programs to Foster Cross-Campus Collaborations Aimed a...Leveraging Early-Alert Programs to Foster Cross-Campus Collaborations Aimed a...
Leveraging Early-Alert Programs to Foster Cross-Campus Collaborations Aimed a...
 
Designing Early Alert Programs Aimed at Fostering Student Success and Persist...
Designing Early Alert Programs Aimed at Fostering Student Success and Persist...Designing Early Alert Programs Aimed at Fostering Student Success and Persist...
Designing Early Alert Programs Aimed at Fostering Student Success and Persist...
 
Academic Recovery: Designing a Seminar to Support Students on Probation
Academic Recovery: Designing a Seminar to Support Students on ProbationAcademic Recovery: Designing a Seminar to Support Students on Probation
Academic Recovery: Designing a Seminar to Support Students on Probation
 
Education Abroad and Formative Outcomes Assessment: What Professors Think The...
Education Abroad and Formative Outcomes Assessment: What Professors Think The...Education Abroad and Formative Outcomes Assessment: What Professors Think The...
Education Abroad and Formative Outcomes Assessment: What Professors Think The...
 
Designing Early Alert Programs Aimed at Fostering Student Success and Persist...
Designing Early Alert Programs Aimed at Fostering Student Success and Persist...Designing Early Alert Programs Aimed at Fostering Student Success and Persist...
Designing Early Alert Programs Aimed at Fostering Student Success and Persist...
 
Making feedback count
Making feedback countMaking feedback count
Making feedback count
 
Bettinger Keynote: The Difficulty of Knowing and The "E" Word
Bettinger Keynote: The Difficulty of Knowing and The "E" WordBettinger Keynote: The Difficulty of Knowing and The "E" Word
Bettinger Keynote: The Difficulty of Knowing and The "E" Word
 
Manchester Next Generation Spaces keynote
Manchester Next Generation Spaces keynoteManchester Next Generation Spaces keynote
Manchester Next Generation Spaces keynote
 
UC&R East Midlands event slides 8th June 2010 'Teaching and learning - addres...
UC&R East Midlands event slides 8th June 2010 'Teaching and learning - addres...UC&R East Midlands event slides 8th June 2010 'Teaching and learning - addres...
UC&R East Midlands event slides 8th June 2010 'Teaching and learning - addres...
 
MSEA: Assessment for ALL Learners
MSEA: Assessment for ALL LearnersMSEA: Assessment for ALL Learners
MSEA: Assessment for ALL Learners
 
Leveraging Early-alert Programs to Foster Cross-Campus Collaborations Aimed a...
Leveraging Early-alert Programs to Foster Cross-Campus Collaborations Aimed a...Leveraging Early-alert Programs to Foster Cross-Campus Collaborations Aimed a...
Leveraging Early-alert Programs to Foster Cross-Campus Collaborations Aimed a...
 
Actively engaging student in large classes
Actively engaging student in large classesActively engaging student in large classes
Actively engaging student in large classes
 
Presentation, umkc, 2016
Presentation, umkc, 2016Presentation, umkc, 2016
Presentation, umkc, 2016
 
Introduction to the Assessment for Learning Project
Introduction to the Assessment for Learning ProjectIntroduction to the Assessment for Learning Project
Introduction to the Assessment for Learning Project
 
How can mentoring and a programme like this support the challenges that we fa...
How can mentoring and a programme like this support the challenges that we fa...How can mentoring and a programme like this support the challenges that we fa...
How can mentoring and a programme like this support the challenges that we fa...
 

Similar to Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability

Admissions Counselor Training
Admissions Counselor TrainingAdmissions Counselor Training
Admissions Counselor Training
Sarah
 
Admissions Counselor Training
Admissions Counselor TrainingAdmissions Counselor Training
Admissions Counselor Training
Sarah
 
HTIYG's Poster Final 22 June Printing
HTIYG's Poster Final 22 June PrintingHTIYG's Poster Final 22 June Printing
HTIYG's Poster Final 22 June Printing
Julie Harbert
 

Similar to Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability (20)

"Mapping the Student Lifecycle from Inquiry Through Graduation" [CAHEA Presen...
"Mapping the Student Lifecycle from Inquiry Through Graduation" [CAHEA Presen..."Mapping the Student Lifecycle from Inquiry Through Graduation" [CAHEA Presen...
"Mapping the Student Lifecycle from Inquiry Through Graduation" [CAHEA Presen...
 
UHI Millennium Institute, HoTLS, Experiential Education Presentation, 2008
UHI Millennium Institute, HoTLS, Experiential Education Presentation, 2008UHI Millennium Institute, HoTLS, Experiential Education Presentation, 2008
UHI Millennium Institute, HoTLS, Experiential Education Presentation, 2008
 
Lead nurturing Campaign
Lead nurturing CampaignLead nurturing Campaign
Lead nurturing Campaign
 
Resume 5.16.15
Resume 5.16.15Resume 5.16.15
Resume 5.16.15
 
Improving and Demonstrating Impact for Youth Using Qualitative Data
Improving and Demonstrating Impact for Youth Using Qualitative DataImproving and Demonstrating Impact for Youth Using Qualitative Data
Improving and Demonstrating Impact for Youth Using Qualitative Data
 
4 Key Strategies for Using Assessments to Drive a Culture of Growth
4 Key Strategies for Using Assessments to Drive a Culture of Growth4 Key Strategies for Using Assessments to Drive a Culture of Growth
4 Key Strategies for Using Assessments to Drive a Culture of Growth
 
Admissions Counselor Training
Admissions Counselor TrainingAdmissions Counselor Training
Admissions Counselor Training
 
The Campus Community Life Cycle: From Admissions to Alumni
The Campus Community Life Cycle: From Admissions to AlumniThe Campus Community Life Cycle: From Admissions to Alumni
The Campus Community Life Cycle: From Admissions to Alumni
 
Admissions Counselor Training
Admissions Counselor TrainingAdmissions Counselor Training
Admissions Counselor Training
 
Workers in Transition NATCON
Workers in Transition NATCONWorkers in Transition NATCON
Workers in Transition NATCON
 
Portfolio Study NATCON 2008
Portfolio Study NATCON 2008Portfolio Study NATCON 2008
Portfolio Study NATCON 2008
 
Maria Raciti: Evaluating Indigenous outreach programs in five steps
Maria Raciti: Evaluating Indigenous outreach programs in five stepsMaria Raciti: Evaluating Indigenous outreach programs in five steps
Maria Raciti: Evaluating Indigenous outreach programs in five steps
 
Disrupted Futures 2023 | Wisconsin's career guidance project
Disrupted Futures 2023 | Wisconsin's career guidance projectDisrupted Futures 2023 | Wisconsin's career guidance project
Disrupted Futures 2023 | Wisconsin's career guidance project
 
College Readiness & Career Exploration
College Readiness & Career Exploration College Readiness & Career Exploration
College Readiness & Career Exploration
 
Dennis Pruitt: Student Affairs in the 21st Century
Dennis Pruitt: Student Affairs in the 21st CenturyDennis Pruitt: Student Affairs in the 21st Century
Dennis Pruitt: Student Affairs in the 21st Century
 
Tools and Resources for Career Readiness and Career Satisfaction in California
Tools and Resources for Career Readiness and Career Satisfaction in CaliforniaTools and Resources for Career Readiness and Career Satisfaction in California
Tools and Resources for Career Readiness and Career Satisfaction in California
 
Resume
ResumeResume
Resume
 
HTIYG's Poster Final 22 June Printing
HTIYG's Poster Final 22 June PrintingHTIYG's Poster Final 22 June Printing
HTIYG's Poster Final 22 June Printing
 
Presentation2.pptx
Presentation2.pptxPresentation2.pptx
Presentation2.pptx
 
Life Without Levels INSET
Life Without Levels INSETLife Without Levels INSET
Life Without Levels INSET
 

More from CIEE

More from CIEE (20)

Before They Even Get Here: Cross-Campus Collaboration on a New Pre-Freshman S...
Before They Even Get Here: Cross-Campus Collaboration on a New Pre-Freshman S...Before They Even Get Here: Cross-Campus Collaboration on a New Pre-Freshman S...
Before They Even Get Here: Cross-Campus Collaboration on a New Pre-Freshman S...
 
It Takes a Village: Building a Support System for Diversity Abroad
It Takes a Village: Building a Support System for Diversity AbroadIt Takes a Village: Building a Support System for Diversity Abroad
It Takes a Village: Building a Support System for Diversity Abroad
 
Intercultural Faculty Training for the Development of Innovative Global Initi...
Intercultural Faculty Training for the Development of Innovative Global Initi...Intercultural Faculty Training for the Development of Innovative Global Initi...
Intercultural Faculty Training for the Development of Innovative Global Initi...
 
Know Your Audience: Using Pre-existing Norms to Overcome Curricular and Cultu...
Know Your Audience: Using Pre-existing Norms to Overcome Curricular and Cultu...Know Your Audience: Using Pre-existing Norms to Overcome Curricular and Cultu...
Know Your Audience: Using Pre-existing Norms to Overcome Curricular and Cultu...
 
Opening More Doors: Keys to Successful Faculty-Led Study Abroad for Graduate ...
Opening More Doors: Keys to Successful Faculty-Led Study Abroad for Graduate ...Opening More Doors: Keys to Successful Faculty-Led Study Abroad for Graduate ...
Opening More Doors: Keys to Successful Faculty-Led Study Abroad for Graduate ...
 
Breakfast Presentation
Breakfast PresentationBreakfast Presentation
Breakfast Presentation
 
Education Goes International: Partnering Abroad to Build Teacher Education Pr...
Education Goes International: Partnering Abroad to Build Teacher Education Pr...Education Goes International: Partnering Abroad to Build Teacher Education Pr...
Education Goes International: Partnering Abroad to Build Teacher Education Pr...
 
Designing and Delivering Globally Connected Domestic Programs
Designing and Delivering Globally Connected Domestic ProgramsDesigning and Delivering Globally Connected Domestic Programs
Designing and Delivering Globally Connected Domestic Programs
 
Using Giving Games to Develop International and Intercultural Critical Thinki...
Using Giving Games to Develop International and Intercultural Critical Thinki...Using Giving Games to Develop International and Intercultural Critical Thinki...
Using Giving Games to Develop International and Intercultural Critical Thinki...
 
The Evolution of Study Abroad Programs to Achieve Greater Student Diversity
The Evolution of Study Abroad Programs to Achieve Greater Student DiversityThe Evolution of Study Abroad Programs to Achieve Greater Student Diversity
The Evolution of Study Abroad Programs to Achieve Greater Student Diversity
 
Customizing and Funding Professional Development to Internationalize the Curr...
Customizing and Funding Professional Development to Internationalize the Curr...Customizing and Funding Professional Development to Internationalize the Curr...
Customizing and Funding Professional Development to Internationalize the Curr...
 
Outside of Our Comfort Zones: Faculty Identity and Pedagogy in the Global Cla...
Outside of Our Comfort Zones: Faculty Identity and Pedagogy in the Global Cla...Outside of Our Comfort Zones: Faculty Identity and Pedagogy in the Global Cla...
Outside of Our Comfort Zones: Faculty Identity and Pedagogy in the Global Cla...
 
Moving Beyond the Single-Discipline Faculty-Led Model: How Can Music Business...
Moving Beyond the Single-Discipline Faculty-Led Model: How Can Music Business...Moving Beyond the Single-Discipline Faculty-Led Model: How Can Music Business...
Moving Beyond the Single-Discipline Faculty-Led Model: How Can Music Business...
 
Getting Real with Diversity Outreach: A Practical Toolkit for Promoting Study...
Getting Real with Diversity Outreach: A Practical Toolkit for Promoting Study...Getting Real with Diversity Outreach: A Practical Toolkit for Promoting Study...
Getting Real with Diversity Outreach: A Practical Toolkit for Promoting Study...
 
Facilitating Mobility for Engineering Majors: Successful Partnerships between...
Facilitating Mobility for Engineering Majors: Successful Partnerships between...Facilitating Mobility for Engineering Majors: Successful Partnerships between...
Facilitating Mobility for Engineering Majors: Successful Partnerships between...
 
Developing Global Citizens: Increasing Faculty Engagement in Intercultural Le...
Developing Global Citizens: Increasing Faculty Engagement in Intercultural Le...Developing Global Citizens: Increasing Faculty Engagement in Intercultural Le...
Developing Global Citizens: Increasing Faculty Engagement in Intercultural Le...
 
Between a Religious Rock and a Hard Study Abroad Place: Supporting Students o...
Between a Religious Rock and a Hard Study Abroad Place: Supporting Students o...Between a Religious Rock and a Hard Study Abroad Place: Supporting Students o...
Between a Religious Rock and a Hard Study Abroad Place: Supporting Students o...
 
In With the Locals: Why On-Site Connection Matters
In With the Locals: Why On-Site Connection MattersIn With the Locals: Why On-Site Connection Matters
In With the Locals: Why On-Site Connection Matters
 
Washington Update
Washington UpdateWashington Update
Washington Update
 
Engaging Generation Z: Integrating Global and Local Vision, Structure, and In...
Engaging Generation Z: Integrating Global and Local Vision, Structure, and In...Engaging Generation Z: Integrating Global and Local Vision, Structure, and In...
Engaging Generation Z: Integrating Global and Local Vision, Structure, and In...
 

Recently uploaded

會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文
會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文
會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文
中 央社
 
SPLICE Working Group: Reusable Code Examples
SPLICE Working Group:Reusable Code ExamplesSPLICE Working Group:Reusable Code Examples
SPLICE Working Group: Reusable Code Examples
Peter Brusilovsky
 

Recently uploaded (20)

How to Manage Website in Odoo 17 Studio App.pptx
How to Manage Website in Odoo 17 Studio App.pptxHow to Manage Website in Odoo 17 Studio App.pptx
How to Manage Website in Odoo 17 Studio App.pptx
 
Climbers and Creepers used in landscaping
Climbers and Creepers used in landscapingClimbers and Creepers used in landscaping
Climbers and Creepers used in landscaping
 
Andreas Schleicher presents at the launch of What does child empowerment mean...
Andreas Schleicher presents at the launch of What does child empowerment mean...Andreas Schleicher presents at the launch of What does child empowerment mean...
Andreas Schleicher presents at the launch of What does child empowerment mean...
 
8 Tips for Effective Working Capital Management
8 Tips for Effective Working Capital Management8 Tips for Effective Working Capital Management
8 Tips for Effective Working Capital Management
 
PSYPACT- Practicing Over State Lines May 2024.pptx
PSYPACT- Practicing Over State Lines May 2024.pptxPSYPACT- Practicing Over State Lines May 2024.pptx
PSYPACT- Practicing Over State Lines May 2024.pptx
 
Đề tieng anh thpt 2024 danh cho cac ban hoc sinh
Đề tieng anh thpt 2024 danh cho cac ban hoc sinhĐề tieng anh thpt 2024 danh cho cac ban hoc sinh
Đề tieng anh thpt 2024 danh cho cac ban hoc sinh
 
Stl Algorithms in C++ jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjj
Stl Algorithms in C++ jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjStl Algorithms in C++ jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjj
Stl Algorithms in C++ jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjj
 
BỘ LUYỆN NGHE TIẾNG ANH 8 GLOBAL SUCCESS CẢ NĂM (GỒM 12 UNITS, MỖI UNIT GỒM 3...
BỘ LUYỆN NGHE TIẾNG ANH 8 GLOBAL SUCCESS CẢ NĂM (GỒM 12 UNITS, MỖI UNIT GỒM 3...BỘ LUYỆN NGHE TIẾNG ANH 8 GLOBAL SUCCESS CẢ NĂM (GỒM 12 UNITS, MỖI UNIT GỒM 3...
BỘ LUYỆN NGHE TIẾNG ANH 8 GLOBAL SUCCESS CẢ NĂM (GỒM 12 UNITS, MỖI UNIT GỒM 3...
 
會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文
會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文
會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文會考英文
 
24 ĐỀ THAM KHẢO KÌ THI TUYỂN SINH VÀO LỚP 10 MÔN TIẾNG ANH SỞ GIÁO DỤC HẢI DƯ...
24 ĐỀ THAM KHẢO KÌ THI TUYỂN SINH VÀO LỚP 10 MÔN TIẾNG ANH SỞ GIÁO DỤC HẢI DƯ...24 ĐỀ THAM KHẢO KÌ THI TUYỂN SINH VÀO LỚP 10 MÔN TIẾNG ANH SỞ GIÁO DỤC HẢI DƯ...
24 ĐỀ THAM KHẢO KÌ THI TUYỂN SINH VÀO LỚP 10 MÔN TIẾNG ANH SỞ GIÁO DỤC HẢI DƯ...
 
SPLICE Working Group: Reusable Code Examples
SPLICE Working Group:Reusable Code ExamplesSPLICE Working Group:Reusable Code Examples
SPLICE Working Group: Reusable Code Examples
 
Analyzing and resolving a communication crisis in Dhaka textiles LTD.pptx
Analyzing and resolving a communication crisis in Dhaka textiles LTD.pptxAnalyzing and resolving a communication crisis in Dhaka textiles LTD.pptx
Analyzing and resolving a communication crisis in Dhaka textiles LTD.pptx
 
Major project report on Tata Motors and its marketing strategies
Major project report on Tata Motors and its marketing strategiesMajor project report on Tata Motors and its marketing strategies
Major project report on Tata Motors and its marketing strategies
 
OSCM Unit 2_Operations Processes & Systems
OSCM Unit 2_Operations Processes & SystemsOSCM Unit 2_Operations Processes & Systems
OSCM Unit 2_Operations Processes & Systems
 
How To Create Editable Tree View in Odoo 17
How To Create Editable Tree View in Odoo 17How To Create Editable Tree View in Odoo 17
How To Create Editable Tree View in Odoo 17
 
TỔNG HỢP HƠN 100 ĐỀ THI THỬ TỐT NGHIỆP THPT TOÁN 2024 - TỪ CÁC TRƯỜNG, TRƯỜNG...
TỔNG HỢP HƠN 100 ĐỀ THI THỬ TỐT NGHIỆP THPT TOÁN 2024 - TỪ CÁC TRƯỜNG, TRƯỜNG...TỔNG HỢP HƠN 100 ĐỀ THI THỬ TỐT NGHIỆP THPT TOÁN 2024 - TỪ CÁC TRƯỜNG, TRƯỜNG...
TỔNG HỢP HƠN 100 ĐỀ THI THỬ TỐT NGHIỆP THPT TOÁN 2024 - TỪ CÁC TRƯỜNG, TRƯỜNG...
 
UChicago CMSC 23320 - The Best Commit Messages of 2024
UChicago CMSC 23320 - The Best Commit Messages of 2024UChicago CMSC 23320 - The Best Commit Messages of 2024
UChicago CMSC 23320 - The Best Commit Messages of 2024
 
Mattingly "AI & Prompt Design: Named Entity Recognition"
Mattingly "AI & Prompt Design: Named Entity Recognition"Mattingly "AI & Prompt Design: Named Entity Recognition"
Mattingly "AI & Prompt Design: Named Entity Recognition"
 
Graduate Outcomes Presentation Slides - English (v3).pptx
Graduate Outcomes Presentation Slides - English (v3).pptxGraduate Outcomes Presentation Slides - English (v3).pptx
Graduate Outcomes Presentation Slides - English (v3).pptx
 
ĐỀ THAM KHẢO KÌ THI TUYỂN SINH VÀO LỚP 10 MÔN TIẾNG ANH FORM 50 CÂU TRẮC NGHI...
ĐỀ THAM KHẢO KÌ THI TUYỂN SINH VÀO LỚP 10 MÔN TIẾNG ANH FORM 50 CÂU TRẮC NGHI...ĐỀ THAM KHẢO KÌ THI TUYỂN SINH VÀO LỚP 10 MÔN TIẾNG ANH FORM 50 CÂU TRẮC NGHI...
ĐỀ THAM KHẢO KÌ THI TUYỂN SINH VÀO LỚP 10 MÔN TIẾNG ANH FORM 50 CÂU TRẮC NGHI...
 

Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability

  • 1. Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience & Employability Melissa Buerkett-Vivian, LMHC - Global Experiences, Inc. Shawna Hurley - Gilman International Scholarship Program, IIE Stacey Shimizu - Illinois Wesleyan University CIEE Annual Conference 2014, Baltimore, MD
  • 2. Trends in International Internships Open Doors 2014 For-Credit Internships or Work 2010/11** 2011/12 2012/13 Total Students 17,536 20,676 20,498 Non-Credit Internships or Work 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 Total Students 8,700 12,758 15,089
  • 3. Gilman Internship Experiences Survey • Gilman Scholars for 2013-2014 academic year • 144 responses from interns • 47 countries (top 3 countries China, Japan and UK) • 78% participated in program that was a combination of academic study and internship • 29% did not plan to participate in internship before program
  • 4. How did you identify and arrange your internship abroad? 4% 1% 7% 37% 59% Through my institution Through a program provider Through friends or family connections Through current job or professional connections Other
  • 5. Who was most helpful in assisting you as you set up your internship abroad? 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Program Provider Advisor Study Abroad Advisor/Staff Faculty Member Friend Other (myself, on-site coordinator) Family 59 50 22 6 5 2
  • 6. In what ways did your home institution prepare you for your internship abroad? 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 79 59 35 30 21 12 10 8  “As a first generation study abroad student, I really wasn't sure how to prepare for studying abroad. I really depended on my online study abroad advisor who truly went above and beyond helping me get ready for my internship.”
  • 7. How did you utilize your connections and skills learned abroad as you seek/sought employment? 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Put information regarding my internship on my resume and referenced skills in inteviews Networked and made connections that I have utilized to find a job Found a mentor Other Gained employment with the organization where I interned 126 32 25 18 7
  • 8. Illinois Wesleyan University  Small residential liberal arts college  ~1900 students  College of Liberal Arts + Schools of Nursing, Theater Arts, Fine Arts and Music  ~50% of students have international experience by graduation
  • 9. Pre-Departure Program  Pre-2014, 3-hour in-person departure meeting  Spring 2014, self-paced Moodle course + 3-hour meeting  One hour now dedicated to making link between study abroad and career preparations.
  • 10.
  • 11. Illinois Wesleyan Nursing  IWU Spain Program  Island program, originally for general education and Hispanic Studies  2012, opened to sophomore nursing students  Two required nursing courses (delivered using synchronous learning technology) with attached healthcare observations in local clinics  Complementary language component and workshop on healthcare differences between Spain and the US
  • 12.
  • 13. Nursing Program Results  First cohort graduated May 2014; 100% job placement  No significant difference in nursing academic performance or GPA between first semester and second semester of sophomore year or between cohort grades, regardless of location  Reports of satisfaction with experience on exit interviews and self-reported sense of increased cultural competence
  • 14. Global Experiences International Internships Who we are  Over 4,000 alumni since 2001  10 Cities in 8 countries on 4 continents  Mission = "To provide life-changing experiences“  Partnership with Gallup Education since Spring 2013 Why we use Strengths  Develop innovative career development program  Identify how internships abroad positively impact lives  Research shows that knowing and using Strengths leads to success
  • 15. Phase 1: Pre-Departure Prep  Clifton StrengthsFinder Assessment – Top 5 Strengths  Individual coaching and advising  Résumés and cover letters  Mock interviewing  Professional behavior and etiquette (during the placement process)  Career planning and decision making (choosing a placement)  Career development webinar series  Rocking Your Interview  The Digital You  Your Top 5 Strengths  Using LinkedIn*  Reflections on Language & Culture
  • 16. Phase 2: Focus on Strengths Abroad Orientation to deepen understanding and strategy for success  Site visits for reflection and employer feedback Midpoint workshop to overcome challenges and enhance professional communication and networking skills Global Connections Networking Debriefing on career decisions and job search skills
  • 17. An Experiential Approach  Orientation – “Where do I stand?”  Why did you stand where you did?  How does it relate to your Strengths?  What did you learn from observing others’ positions?
  • 18. An Experiential Approach  Midpoint Workshop – “Your Best”  Discuss in small groups, one theme that you feel fits best and why.  How do you use it in your internship? Past positions?  How does it help you succeed?  Practice presenting your best self to a new professional contact or potential employer
  • 19. An Experiential Approach  Debriefing Workshop  No-lose Model to Career Decision Making  From Grad to Great – Using Strengths as transferrable skills in résumés, cover letters and interviews  Mock interviews with location coordinators
  • 20. Site Visits for Feedback & Reflection  Pick one task and tell me how your strengths help you perform it.  "I used my Ideation in the brainstorm meetings, and I have to think Strategically when considering which media companies to contact.”  How have you used your strengths to overcome a challenge at work?  "At first, I wasn’t sure what I could bring to the table. I was nervous about how I would do. Knowing my Strengths helped me have more confidence."
  • 21. Program Assessment  Survey collaboration with Dr. Shane Lopez, leading psychologist and author of “Making Hope Happen”  107 interns were surveyed online pre- and post-program  3 Measures: Hope, Well-being and Strengths awareness  The results of the exit survey showed:  78% increase in Hope  78% increase in Strengths awareness  86% increase in overall Well-being
  • 22. Phase 3: Re-Entry Services  Career Toolkit  Alumni Webinar Series  Using LinkedIn to Job Search  Leveraging Your International Experience  Networking  Alumni Panel  Professional Networking  LinkedIn, Facebook, Global Connections  Ambassador Program and the Alumni Assistant Role  Business cards  Recommendations
  • 23. Gilman Alumni Re-Entry Resources  Webinars/Videos  Re-Entry  Extending Your Exchange Experience  Networking Opportunities  LinkedIn  International Exchange Alumni  Gilman-Fulbright Networking Receptions  Gilman Alumni Ambassador Program (GAAP)
  • 24. Re-Entry at IWU  Standard study abroad re-entry program  Pre-return and welcome-back emails with resources  Welcome Back reception hosted by university president  Online resources  Invitations throughout year to engage in IO activities and mentor new applicants  Career-specific re-entry  “Bringing It Home” workshop with the Career Center  Nursing-specific re-entry  3-week intensive May Term for clinical training
  • 25. Contact Information Melissa Buerkett-Vivian, LMHC – melissa@globalexperiences.com Academic Internship Director Global Experiences, Inc. Shawna Hurley– shurley@iie.org Operations Manager, Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program Institute of International Education (IIE) – Houston Stacey Shimizu– sshimizu@iwu.edu Director, International Office Illinois Wesleyan University
  • 26. Career Activities Quick activities to help students communicate their strengths in interviews, resumes, and conversations. The Gallup Organization Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  • 27. Activity #1: Meaningful Roles Goal: To help students think through roles they have had and how they used their strengths within those roles. This activity works best when students gather in groups of three or four to discuss their findings. You may want to provide your own example so they can understand how their strengths can relate their own successes. 1. Have students list three of the most meaningful and important jobs, leadership roles, or volunteer positions they have held. For each, have them describe five responsibilities or outcomes they achieved in those roles. 2. For each outcome ask them to write the Clifton StrengthsFinder theme or themes that they utilized to help them be successful in achieving the outcome. 3. In any interview it is important for candidates to verbalize and give detailed information about what they have done in their past roles. Ask each student to take one of their outcomes and come up with a specific example of how they achieved that success. Students must “sell themselves” by using each of the themes they listed to describe exactly how they achieved their success. Additional Ideas: • The best interview responses are specific; they clearly state what the person has done and how they did it. Using strengths can help them paint a picture of who they are and what they are good at. • Examples will help tremendously, so if there is time, walk through one or more with your students to give them good models from which to learn. • To provide even more examples, after students have discussed their successes in their small groups, have a few students share their achievements with the larger group. • Feedback is important. Try to help the lesson set in by giving them feedback and getting them to be more specific about how they can use their strengths to describe what they do and how they do it. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  • 28. Activity #2: My Best Goal: Students need to own their themes and learn to truly understand the value of them. This activity helps them analyze when and how they have used a particular theme to be successful. This activity works best when students gather in groups of three or four to discuss their findings. You may want to provide your own example so they can understand how their strengths can relate their own successes. 1. Have each student choose one theme that they feel fits theme best. Have them answer the following questions in their small groups. a. What is best about this theme? b. How do you use it in your school work? c. How do you use it in jobs or other positions you have held? d. What would happen if you didn’t have this theme? e. How does this theme help you be successful? 2. After each student has shared their responses, give them five minutes to prepare themselves to “sell” these talents as something an employer would want and could benefit from. They will have 2 minutes to present in the small or larger group. Additional Ideas: • Think about more questions for the students to discuss. If you have a specific topic, role, or career you are focusing on, additional questions may help them bring more focus to this activity. • Prepare your own example to show them how you can sell yourself. • Consider providing a specific job or project they must have in mind when selling their strengths. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  • 29. Activity #3: Personal Statement of Strength Goal: Who am I? This activity helps students answer this question and helps students pull all of their themes together. It can help them to take ownership for the themes and begin to see how to use strengths as a language to describe themselves. Using their top five themes students write one to two paragraphs about themselves. Their goal is to combine their themes in a way that tells a story about who they are and what is best about them. Students can be as creative as they want. The goal is to get them to start talking about themselves using the language of strengths. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  • 30. Activity #4: Job Analysis Goal: A key to helping students utilize thei talents is to get them to analyze opportunities based on what they do best. The goal for this activity is to put some real positions in front of them to see how their strengths fit that role. You will need to have two or three job descriptions either from your own organization or a job board like Monster.com. Or, feel free to write your own description. This could be a job, a volunteer project, or a leadership opportunity. The descriptions should be fairly detailed in order to show the outcomes and the responsibilities of the position. The job analysis can be discussed in small or large groups. 1. Have the students read through the descriptions one position at a time. 2. For each of the outcomes or responsibilities listed for the job, ask them to look at their themes and write beside each of them the theme or themes that would help them achieve the success described for each statement. Make it clear that not all of the outcomes or responsibilites may fit them, so there may not be themes written on some statements. Depending on time, students can do this activity for one or more job descriptions. 3. Next, ask students to consider the answers to these questions in order to think through their fit for the role: a. Would most of my strengths be utilized in this role? b. Are there some strengths that wouldn’t get much use if I took a role like this? What are they and how would that make me feel? c. Are there some things in this position that would be difficult for me to do? d. How well would this position fit me? e. What things would I like to have added to this if I could? f. What parts of the role do not fit? g. How would I feel in this type of a role? 4. In a group, talk about finding a role that fits you and your strengths. Talk about your experience in roles that may not have fit you very well and what that was like. Encourage students to do this with leadership positions, jobs, internships, or projects in which they plan to play a role. Additional Ideas: • There are no right or wrong answers to these questions — let students know that. You may even use yourself as an example to show that not everything in a role may fit you perfectly, but that it is very important to get into roles that best utilize your strengths.You may even talk about roles that didn’t fit you and why. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  • 31. • Encourage students to keep their strengths in mind as they consider taking on new roles in the future. Remind them to look every role and analyze it based on their strengths. Copyright © 2006 The Gallup Organization, Princeton, NJ. All rights reserved. Gallup®, StrengthsFinder®, Clifton StrengthsFinder™, and StrengthsQuest™ are trademarks of The Gallup Organization.
  • 32. To help make the most of your time abroad—personally, academically, professionally—you should set some clear goals. The best goals are SMART: Specific — "I plan to join a student club at the local university so that I can meet local students," rather than, "Make friends." Measurable — "I want to experience/learn something new (try a new food, learn a new word, see a new museum) about my host culture each day," rather than, "Learn about my host culture." Attainable — "I want to gain hand-on research skills through my field study class." Realistic — "I want to be able to hold a conversation in Spanish with someone I have just met," rather than, "Become fluent in Spanish." Time-bound — "By the middle of the semester, I want to have planned and booked my own trip to another country." And remember that deadlines are sometimes a good thing. To help you get started, here is a template you can use as you prepare for your semester abroad. Though it talks about career goals, it can be repeated to set personal, academic, or other goals. List three (3) career-related goals for your time abroad. Ex. I want to learn more about teaching English abroad. 1. 2. 3. Now, list three (3) concrete actions to take now or while abroad to help you reach your goals. Ex. I will talk with my program to see if there is some way I can volunteer as a language tutor. 1. 2. 3.
  • 33. Prior to site visit: Contact both employer and intern separately to ask if there is anything specific they would like to discuss or get out of the meeting. Remind the intern that the site visit is for them – to help them get professional feedback and to ensure the rest of their internship is as great as it can be. Site visit recording form Company: Supervisor name: Intern name: Date: GE representative: Introduction: explain purpose of the meeting and that the questions are designed to help the intern reflect on their experience in a way that they might present it to future employers. Encourage intern and supervisor to create a discussion around each answer. NB. It might be appropriate to have 2 minutes with the supervisor and intern separately first, especially if there are known issues. Questions posed to intern, but encourage supervisor to input their thoughts too: 1. Tell me about your experience so far and some of the projects/tasks you’ve been working on. • 2. Thinking about your responsibilities, what are the three most important aspects of your role? • 3. Pick one of these responsibilities and tell me how your strengths help you perform it. • 4. To employer: What strengths have you seen the intern use during the internship so far? • 5. To intern again: Who do you partner with in your role? What strengths or talents do they have? • 6. What’s been the highlight of your internship so far (ie. What do you enjoy most)? What do you enjoy the least? • 7. Have you had to overcome any challenges at work so far? If so, how have you used your strengths to do this? • 8. What are some things you’ve learned as a result of your internship and how has this better prepared you for your future? • 9. To both: What goals do you have for the rest of the internship? • 10. To both: Is there anything we could do to better to prepare you both for this experience? • 11. To employer: Does your organization have additional needs for other interns? Do you have friends or colleagues who would benefit from having an intern? •
  • 34. Update notes for Salesforce (if it needs updating please highlight yellow): Supervisor name and contact details: Address of internship: Skills/experience required (“ideal candidate” description for website): Key internship tasks: 1. 2. 3. Number of interns required at a time: *****Don’t forget to take a photo!*****
  • 35. Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability Further Resources Resources CIEE Annual Conference 2014 | FURTHER RESOURCES  British Council, Ipsos Public Affairs, and Booz Allen Hamilton (2013). Culture at Work: The value of intercultural skills in the workplace. Retrieved from http://www.britishcouncil.org/sites/britishcouncil.uk2/files/culture-at-work- report.pdf  Gardner, Gross, & Steglitz. (2008). Unpacking Your Study Abroad Experience: Critical Reflection for Workplace Competencies. Collegiate Employment Research Institute Research Brief, 1 (1). Retrieved from http://ceri.msu.edu/publications/pdf/brief1-2008final.pdf  Gilman Scholarship Program Web Symposium. Career-Oriented Internship Opportunities. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/Programs/Gilman-Scholarship-Program/News-and-Social-Media/Videos/WS-International- Internships Working Together, Working Abroad. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/Programs/Gilman-Scholarship-Program/News-and-Social-Media/Videos/WS-Working- Together-Working-Abroad  Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. (2012). Tippie Roadmap Skills Inventory. http://tippie.uiowa.edu/undergraduate/roadmap/skills-inventory.cfm  Kuh, G. (2008). High-Impact Educational Practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Association of American Colleges and Universities. Retrieved from http://www.neasc.org/downloads/aacu_high_impact_2008_final.pdf  Levinger, Morrison, & Jouannelle. (2011). Beyond "It was awesome!” Enriching the Student Experience after Re-entry. CIEE Annual Conference 2011, New Orleans. Retrieved from http://www.ciee.org/conference/downloads/past/new-orleans/skills_survey.pdf.  NAFSA Association of International Educators. (2014). Study Abroad Career Plan: A Guide for Advising Students. Retrieved from http://www.nafsa.org/Find_Resources/Supporting_Study_Abroad/Network_Resources/Education_Abroad /Study_Abroad_Career_Plan__A_Guide_for_Advising_Students/  NAFSA Association of International Educators. (2013). Subcommittee on Work, Internships and Volunteering Abroad (WIVA) – Resource Library. Retrieved from http://www.nafsa.org/resourcelibrary/default.aspx?catId=429109  School for International Training. (2008). After Study Abroad: A toolkit for returning students. Retrieved from http://www.worldlearning.org/linkservid/056F078A-EDEB-BEAE-FD0050C1F1E0F368/showMeta/0/  Tillman, M. (2011). AIFS Student Guide to Study Abroad & Career Development. Retrieved from http://www.aifsabroad.com/advisors/pdf/Tillman_AIFS_Student_Guide_Career.pdf  Tillman, M. (2014). Campus Best Practices: Supporting Education Abroad & Student Career Development. Retrieved from http://www.aifsabroad.com/advisors/pdf/Tillman_Best_Practices.pdf  University of Texas at Austin, Center for International Business Education & Research (CIBER). Planning for Study Abroad with Recruiting and Your Career in Mind. PDF Retrieved from http://www.mccombs.utexas.edu/Centers/CIBER/Summer/~/media/Files/MSB/Centers/CIBER/Study%20A broad%20and%20Career/Planning%20for%20Study%20Abroad.ashx