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An Unusual Lesson Maria Teresa Ciaffaroni [email_address] TESOL - Italy’s XXXII National Convention Nov 30 – Dec 1, 2007 P...
Needs   <ul><li>Combine language and content   </li></ul><ul><li>Tackle relevant and catching content </li></ul><ul><li>En...
Aims   <ul><li>To introduce different genres and types of texts </li></ul><ul><li>To enhance  extensive reading skills </l...
Get in the mood! <ul><li>You are going to listen to a story. To get ready for it you need to go back in time. Relax and tr...
 
Listening! <ul><li>Listen to the first part of the story and try to picture as many details as you can in your mind. </li>...
Some more listening! <ul><li>Look at the signs below. What are they about? How can you tell? </li></ul>Jograffy! Jograffy!...
<ul><li>Now listen to the rest of the story </li></ul>The Wonders of punctuation and Spelling Absolute Certainty about the...
Read and Check! <ul><li>In the story there are quite a few unusual facts How many do you remember? Complete the table belo...
<ul><li>Prepare a notice for the history teacher. Try to make it as persuasive as possible. Show your notice to a partner ...
<ul><li>What do you think the last sign means? Share ideas with a partner. </li></ul>I can teach you a lesson  You won't f...
Read and think ! <ul><li>In small groups choose one of the following statements from the story. What do you think it means...
<ul><li>In small groups find out ideas the story conveys about the following. Compare your findings with some other group....
Find out and try it off! <ul><li>Go through the story again and find as many examples as possible for the following: </li>...
<ul><li>The  rest  of the UM </li></ul>
SLA principles <ul><li>Affective engagement principle </li></ul><ul><li>i+1 principle </li></ul><ul><li>Readiness to acqui...
Affective engagement <ul><li>Language acquisition is more likely to occur if learners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>are effectivel...
Readiness to acquire <ul><li>Learners only learn what they are ready to learn </li></ul><ul><li>Different learners are  ra...
i+1 principle <ul><li>Selection of input is particularly relevant for language acquisition  </li></ul><ul><li>“ I” stands ...
Language awareness <ul><li>If students discover language points on their own  </li></ul><ul><li>after a pleasant, multidim...
Text based approach <ul><li>6 different stages, related to well known SLA principles   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Readiness act...
Readiness activities <ul><li>Literary texts are likely to achieve a deep impact and  favour  a multidimensional response <...
<ul><li>While listening/reading activities which help students to process a text experientially before understanding it li...
Intake response activities <ul><li>Activities which are meant to help students use their representation of a text for lang...
Development activities <ul><li>Activities meant to lead to meaningful language production based upon student experience of...
Input response activities <ul><li>Language focused activities meant to make self discoveries on language patterns and regu...
Development activities <ul><li>Activities with same focus as stage 4. The broad topic is the same but is tackled with diff...
Conclusions   The framework can be used to develop materials using different types of  texts as a starting point, actually...
<ul><ul><li>Set things in motion within the students minds before the actual impact with a text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li...
References   <ul><li>The whole unit of material – complete with teacher’s notes and rationale can be found at  http://unus...
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An Unusual Lesson

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An Unusual Lesson

  1. 1. An Unusual Lesson Maria Teresa Ciaffaroni [email_address] TESOL - Italy’s XXXII National Convention Nov 30 – Dec 1, 2007 PRIMARY ISSUES
  2. 2. Needs <ul><li>Combine language and content </li></ul><ul><li>Tackle relevant and catching content </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Practice integrated skills </li></ul><ul><li>Experience the target language at a deeper and, hopefully, more interesting level </li></ul><ul><li>Develop higher level cognitive skills </li></ul>
  3. 3. Aims <ul><li>To introduce different genres and types of texts </li></ul><ul><li>To enhance extensive reading skills </li></ul><ul><li>To practice speaking in a meaningful context </li></ul><ul><li>To increase passive and active vocabulary </li></ul><ul><li>To develop high level cognitive skills </li></ul><ul><li>To foster co-operation and autonomous learning </li></ul>
  4. 4. Get in the mood! <ul><li>You are going to listen to a story. To get ready for it you need to go back in time. Relax and try to visualize the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What “Fairyland” meant to you when you were a child. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What it was like. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How you felt about it. </li></ul></ul>2. Look at the book cover the story is taken from. Does it match your “Fairyland” in any way? Compare ideas with a partner .
  5. 6. Listening! <ul><li>Listen to the first part of the story and try to picture as many details as you can in your mind. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down the riddle your teacher is going to dictate then try to solve it. </li></ul><ul><li>Imagine a working place for the people you have just heard about. </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to a new passage from the story and check if you were right. </li></ul><ul><li>Draw a few details to illustrate the scene you have just heard about. Show your drawing to other students </li></ul>
  6. 7. Some more listening! <ul><li>Look at the signs below. What are they about? How can you tell? </li></ul>Jograffy! Jograffy! Jograffy! For today only all major land masses and oceans PLUS everything you need to kno about glassiers. One penny or All Major Vegetables accepted
  7. 8. <ul><li>Now listen to the rest of the story </li></ul>The Wonders of punctuation and Spelling Absolute Certainty about the Comma I before E completely Sorted Out The mystery of the Semi-Colon Revealed See the Impersonal (Small extra charge) Fun with Brackets Will accept vegetables, eggs and clean used clothing
  8. 9. Read and Check! <ul><li>In the story there are quite a few unusual facts How many do you remember? Complete the table below then check with a partner. </li></ul>Any other unusual facts How they get paid Who they offer their services to Where they do it What they do What people look like
  9. 10. <ul><li>Prepare a notice for the history teacher. Try to make it as persuasive as possible. Show your notice to a partner </li></ul><ul><li>Draw a picture of Jenny-Green-Teeth for the “Strange creatures” teacher you weren’t able to meet. Also prepare a short note to explain when and where you saw the monster. Ask the teacher what you want to know about Jenny. Compare both your note and picture with a partner. </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><li>What do you think the last sign means? Share ideas with a partner. </li></ul>I can teach you a lesson You won't forget in a hurry !
  11. 12. Read and think ! <ul><li>In small groups choose one of the following statements from the story. What do you think it means? Compare ideas in the group. Report to the other groups. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They sold what anyone needed but often didn’t want. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They sold the key to the universe to people who didn’t even know it was locked. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They taught children enough to shut them up, which was the main thing after all. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>She says it's thinking, but I don't know how you teach that. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Death of Kings through the Ages. Quite a lot of educational blood. </li></ul></ul>
  12. 13. <ul><li>In small groups find out ideas the story conveys about the following. Compare your findings with some other group. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>education </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>teachers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>students </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>teaching and learning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Have you ever had a lesson you didn’t forget in a hurry? When did it happen? Who gave it to you? Share your experience with a partner. </li></ul>
  13. 14. Find out and try it off! <ul><li>Go through the story again and find as many examples as possible for the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Descriptions of people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Descriptions of places </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other kinds of descriptions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Do you make description in the same way in everyday language? Why/ why not? Compare ideas with a partner. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about one of your former teachers. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What did (s)he look like? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What did (s)he use to wear? </li></ul></ul>
  14. 15. <ul><li>The rest of the UM </li></ul>
  15. 16. SLA principles <ul><li>Affective engagement principle </li></ul><ul><li>i+1 principle </li></ul><ul><li>Readiness to acquire </li></ul><ul><li>Language awareness </li></ul>
  16. 17. Affective engagement <ul><li>Language acquisition is more likely to occur if learners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>are effectively engaged in the learning process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>have a positive attitude towards the target language, the teachers, the materials and the activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>feel relaxed, confident and successful </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>are able to respond to the target language not only cognitively but also emotionally, as a whole person </li></ul></ul>
  17. 18. Readiness to acquire <ul><li>Learners only learn what they are ready to learn </li></ul><ul><li>Different learners are rarely ready to learn a particular language point at the same time </li></ul><ul><li>Input materials, language points, tasks and activities need to be as challenging and as varied as possible </li></ul>
  18. 19. i+1 principle <ul><li>Selection of input is particularly relevant for language acquisition </li></ul><ul><li>“ I” stands for comprehensible input and represents what the leaner has already learnt while </li></ul><ul><li>“ 1” what the learner has to learn and may be ready to learn. </li></ul>
  19. 20. Language awareness <ul><li>If students discover language points on their own </li></ul><ul><li>after a pleasant, multidimensional experience of a text </li></ul><ul><li>language points are acquired more easily and retained longer </li></ul>
  20. 21. Text based approach <ul><li>6 different stages, related to well known SLA principles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Readiness activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experiential activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intake response activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Input response activities </li></ul></ul>
  21. 22. Readiness activities <ul><li>Literary texts are likely to achieve a deep impact and favour a multidimensional response </li></ul><ul><li>Before reading or listening to a text students need to get mentally ready to experience it </li></ul><ul><li>It is important to set activities to help students achieve mental readiness for experiencing the text and connect it to their lives </li></ul>
  22. 23. <ul><li>While listening/reading activities which help students to process a text experientially before understanding it linguistically </li></ul><ul><li>For a text to have a deep impact on students they need to experience it in a multidimensional way, that is using as many sensory channels as possible </li></ul><ul><li>Apprehension – a global experience of the deep meaning of a text - before comprehension </li></ul>Experiential activities
  23. 24. Intake response activities <ul><li>Activities which are meant to help students use their representation of a text for language production </li></ul><ul><li>After experiencing a text in a multidimensional way students are ready to reflect on their experience, articulate it a nd share it </li></ul>
  24. 25. Development activities <ul><li>Activities meant to lead to meaningful language production based upon student experience of text </li></ul><ul><li>They requires students to go back to the text before producing something new </li></ul><ul><li>They’re based both on the text experience and comprehension </li></ul>
  25. 26. Input response activities <ul><li>Language focused activities meant to make self discoveries on language patterns and regularities </li></ul><ul><li>Tasks are meant to help students make hypotheses on how language work and try them on </li></ul><ul><li>Tasks aim at long lasting pattern acquisition and development of critical thinking </li></ul>
  26. 27. Development activities <ul><li>Activities with same focus as stage 4. The broad topic is the same but is tackled with different types of texts </li></ul><ul><li>Provide opportunities for meaningful language production </li></ul><ul><li>interact meaningfully </li></ul><ul><li>expand ideas, foster critical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Recycle language points and/or vocabulary </li></ul>
  27. 28. Conclusions The framework can be used to develop materials using different types of texts as a starting point, actually any text which one finds interesting or appealing or moving or what not…provided one keeps in mind a few basic issues
  28. 29. <ul><ul><li>Set things in motion within the students minds before the actual impact with a text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure apprehension comes before comprehension </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trigger multidimensional representation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Favour self language discovery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make language discovery follow deep text experience </li></ul></ul>
  29. 30. References <ul><li>The whole unit of material – complete with teacher’s notes and rationale can be found at http://unusuallesson.blogspot.com </li></ul><ul><li>McGrath, I. (2002) Materials Evaluation and Design for Language Teaching . Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Tomlinson, B. (ed) (1998) Materials Development in Language Teaching . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Tomlinson, B. (ed) (2002) Developing Materials for Language Teaching . London: Continuum . </li></ul>

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