Kanban Introduction (Annotated)

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Kanban Introduction (Annotated)

  1. 1. Kanban
  2. 2. kanban http://availagility.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/kenji-kanban-2.jpg
  3. 3. kanban systems WIP (Work In Progress) limited pull system.
  4. 4. kanban systems WIP (Work In Progress) limited pull system. Toyota knew they couldn’t (and didn’t want to) build cars in the same mass production way that Ford and GM did.
  5. 5. kanban systems WIP (Work In Progress) limited pull system. Toyota knew they couldn’t (and didn’t want to) build cars in the same mass production way that Ford and GM did. Taiichi Ohno pioneered the use of kanban systems at Toyota as a way of providing a Just in Time capability. This is the basis for Toyota’s approach to building cars at the rate of demand.
  6. 6. kanban systems WIP (Work In Progress) limited pull system. Toyota knew they couldn’t (and didn’t want to) build cars in the same mass production way that Ford and GM did. Taiichi Ohno pioneered the use of kanban systems at Toyota as a way of providing a Just in Time capability. This is the basis for Toyota’s approach to building cars at the rate of demand. The inspiration for kanban came from supermarkets that were becoming popular in Japan in the early 50’s.
  7. 7. Shelf (WIP)
  8. 8. Shelf (WIP)
  9. 9. Shelf (WIP)
  10. 10. Shelf (WIP)
  11. 11. Shelf (WIP)
  12. 12. Shelf (WIP)
  13. 13. Shelf (WIP)
  14. 14. Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer)
  15. 15. Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer)
  16. 16. Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer)
  17. 17. Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer)
  18. 18. Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer)
  19. 19. Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer)
  20. 20. Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer)
  21. 21. } Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer) Buffer
  22. 22. } Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer) Buffer
  23. 23. } Shelf (WIP) Back store (Buffer) Buffer
  24. 24. The Kanban Method stop starting, start finishing
  25. 25. David J Anderson Born in Edinburgh raised in Saltcoats
  26. 26. David J Anderson Born in Edinburgh raised in Saltcoats Frustrated with resistance to change he found when trying to help teams adopt Agile methods David decided to pursue a different approach to help software development organisations improve.
  27. 27. Microsoft XIT Worst to Best in 9 months http://www.agilemanagement.net/AMPDFArchive/From_Worst_to_Best_in_9_Months_Final_1_3.pdf
  28. 28. DJA was asked to help the XIT team who were considered one of the worst in there business unit in 2004. Microsoft XIT Worst to Best in 9 months http://www.agilemanagement.net/AMPDFArchive/From_Worst_to_Best_in_9_Months_Final_1_3.pdf
  29. 29. DJA was asked to help the XIT team who were considered one of the worst in there business unit in 2004. The backlog of work was exceeding capacity 5 times and it was growing every month. Microsoft XIT Worst to Best in 9 months http://www.agilemanagement.net/AMPDFArchive/From_Worst_to_Best_in_9_Months_Final_1_3.pdf
  30. 30. DJA was asked to help the XIT team who were considered one of the worst in there business unit in 2004. The backlog of work was exceeding capacity 5 times and it was growing every month. Microsoft XIT DJA helped introduce a WIP limited pull system to change how work was queued. Worst to Best in 9 months http://www.agilemanagement.net/AMPDFArchive/From_Worst_to_Best_in_9_Months_Final_1_3.pdf
  31. 31. DJA was asked to help the XIT team who were considered one of the worst in there business unit in 2004. The backlog of work was exceeding capacity 5 times and it was growing every month. Microsoft XIT DJA helped introduce a WIP limited pull system to change how work was queued. Worst to Best in 9 months “With no new resources, no changes to how the team performed software engineering tasks like design, coding and testing, the changes to how the work was queued and estimated resulted in a 155% productivity gain in 9 months. The lead time was reduced to a maximum of 5 weeks – typically 14 days. Due date performance improved to greater than 90%. The backlog was worked off and the department is no longer seen as an organizational constraint. Customers are delighted.” http://www.agilemanagement.net/AMPDFArchive/From_Worst_to_Best_in_9_Months_Final_1_3.pdf
  32. 32. Corbis IT Way
  33. 33. Corbis IT Way During his time at Corbis the majority of what is now the Kanban Method emerged.
  34. 34. There is no Kanban Software Development Process or Kanban Project Management Method
  35. 35. Before we go any further, lets make this clear... There is no Kanban Software Development Process or Kanban Project Management Method
  36. 36. Before we go any further, lets make this clear... There is no Kanban Software Development Process or Kanban Project Management Method ... you apply Kanban to what you do now. Torbjörn Gyllebring calls it Andban
  37. 37. It helps in 3 ways: • The Sustainability way • The Service Oriented way • The Survivability way
  38. 38. Sustainability • Helps you understand your capability which helps you better balance the demand. • By understanding what we can do helps us work at a sustainable pace • Helps us focus on reducing non-value-added demand (failure demand... aka bugs) • By being predictable it can helps us reduce disruptive expediting
  39. 39. Service Orientated • Improve service delivery by taking variability out of the process • By reducing work in progress we spend less time multi tasking and this helps us improve predictability and lead times • Scale Kanban in an organisation by scaling it out in a service-oriented fashion
  40. 40. Survivability • By limiting WIP and managing flow kanban systems help provoke change. • Kanban Method can also help create a catalyst for evolutionary change and in turn help to create a culture of continuous improvement.
  41. 41. principles
  42. 42. principles Kanban is based on four principles, they are...
  43. 43. start with what you do now
  44. 44. start with what you do now agree to purse incremental and evolutionary change
  45. 45. start with what you do now agree to purse incremental and evolutionary change initially, respect current roles, responsibilities & job titles
  46. 46. start with what you do now agree to purse incremental and evolutionary change initially, respect current roles, responsibilities & job titles encourage acts of leadership at all levels
  47. 47. Here’s a simple example Start where you are and deeply understanding how our work works.
  48. 48. Here’s a simple example Start where you are and deeply understanding how our work works. Ask yourself: Who are our customers? What do they ask us for? What do we do to the requests? And where do they go when you are finished with them?
  49. 49. practices
  50. 50. practices Kanban has 6 practices...
  51. 51. visualise
  52. 52. Demand 214*** Analysis In

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