Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Eleanor - Dry Ice

1,149 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Eleanor - Dry Ice

  1. 1. Dry Ice By Eleanor Silverstein
  2. 2. Basic Facts <ul><li>Dry ice is very cold: -109.3  F or -78.5  C. </li></ul><ul><li>Dry ice melts into a gas, unlike regular ice. </li></ul><ul><li>It skips the liquid state all together. </li></ul><ul><li>Its so cold that touching it can cause frostbite or burns. </li></ul><ul><li>Create the cool “fog” effect that you see in plays or on Halloween. </li></ul>
  3. 3. What is dry ice and what is it made out of? <ul><li>Dry ice is a solid carbon dioxide. </li></ul><ul><li>When it reaches its solid state, the cooled liquid carbon dioxide is put under pressure. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Why does dry ice smoke? <ul><li>At -109.3  F the dry ice subliminates from the solid state into the gaseous state </li></ul><ul><li>It undergoes deposition from a gas to a liquid. </li></ul><ul><li>Dry ice evaporates in the gaseous state as well as the solid state. </li></ul><ul><li>It evaporates into a liquid and then rises into the clouds and then it rains down. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Triple Point <ul><li>A fixed temperature/pressure at which the three phases (liquid, solid, and gas) of that substance can coexist in equilibrium. </li></ul>
  6. 6. VOCAB!!! <ul><li>Sublimation - when a compound transfers from the solid to gas state without going through the liquid state. </li></ul><ul><li>Deposition - when the particles settle down onto a pre-existing surface. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Sources: <ul><li>&quot;How does dry ice work?.&quot; HowStuffWorks . Discovery Communications. <http://www.howstuffworks.com/question264.htm>. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;What is triple point?.&quot; Ask.com . <http://in.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090105021214AA3FgpW>. </li></ul><ul><li>http://chemistry.about.com/od/moleculescompounds/a/dryicefacts.htm </li></ul>

×