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Architectural Relics of 16th Century London

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A respected British investment banker and financier, Christopher Michael Pan has undertaken property development throughout London. With a particular focus on historical buildings, Christopher Michael Pan oversees all aspects of project management and has worked on several noteworthy Georgian and Victorian properties.

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Architectural Relics of 16th Century London

  1. 1. Christopher Michael Pan
  2. 2.  A respected British investment banker and financier, Christopher Michael Pan has undertaken property development throughout London. With a particular focus on historical buildings, Christopher Michael Pan oversees all aspects of project management and has worked on several noteworthy Georgian and Victorian properties. Overshadowed by the more elaborate architectural styles that followed in an era of rapid expansion, London retains a few examples of architecture that predate the Great Fire of 1666. This conflagration spread quickly among tightly packed wooden structures and destroyed an estimated 13,000 houses and nearly 100 churches, including St Paul’s Cathedral.
  3. 3.  Prominent surviving buildings include The Olde Wine Shades, which was near the epicenter of the fire on Pudding Lane. Featuring a historic smugglers tunnel that reaches the Thames River, the wine bar was a favorite 19th century pub haunt of Charles Dickens. Another exceptional piece of history is the timber-framed St. Bartholomew’s Gatehouse, which was constructed in 1595 and features stonework associated with the St. Bartholomew’s Priory nave, which dates back to the 13th century. Safeguarded from fire by the massive priory walls, the timber facade was supplanted by Georgian-era frontage until the original gatehouse was revealed by structural damage sustained during World War I. The present restoration took place in the early 1930s.

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