Successfully reported this slideshow.

The Tradeshow Ecosystem presented at Exhibitor Show

2

Share

Upcoming SlideShare
MCTE Presentation, 10/7/13
MCTE Presentation, 10/7/13
Loading in …3
×
1 of 46
1 of 46

The Tradeshow Ecosystem presented at Exhibitor Show

2

Share

Download to read offline

This presentation focuses on the evolution of the tradeshow ecosystem...where we've come from and where it's going. It's a snapshot into a crystal ball...the future will judge how

This presentation focuses on the evolution of the tradeshow ecosystem...where we've come from and where it's going. It's a snapshot into a crystal ball...the future will judge how

More Related Content

Related Books

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

The Tradeshow Ecosystem presented at Exhibitor Show

  1. 1. Session # T218 The Trade Show Supplier Ecosystem – Today and Tomorrow Chris Kappes, SVP, Strategic Alliances 3D Exhibits
  2. 2. Chris Kappes is a senior-level business builder and difference- maker. Over three decades, he has led national sales/marketing organizations for George P. Johnson, Sparks, Contempo Design and was president of Matrex Exhibits. He is presently SVP at 3D Exhibits where he has a one-word job description: Growth. Chris writes a popular blog (http://exhibitionpro.wordpress.com), is recipient of many industry awards and co-author of a new book: "The Noise of Business. How To Make Trade Shows Work." M121 The Trade Show Supplier Ecosystem – Today and Tomorrow
  3. 3. Table of Contents • What is an ecosystem……………………………………Page 2 • Tradeshow ecosystem …………………………………..Page 4 • US Ecosystem vs. Global ecosystems ……………….Page 6 • Genesis of the US tradeshow ecosystem……..……...Page 7 • US GDP drives exposition growth……………………...Page 13 • Ecosystem member roles………….……………………..Page 15 • Environment challenges impacting ecosystem (US. and global) ……………………………..Page 19 • Future ecosystem models ……………..………………...Page 21
  4. 4. ELC#1 • What is an ecosystem: The concept first appeared in Harvard Business Review in May/June 1993. • What is an ecosystem? • How does it function and • why does it serve a vital role in the industry?
  5. 5. Defined by HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW, 1993 A company viewed not as a member of a single industry but as part of a business ecosystem that crosses a variety of industries. In a business ecosystem, companies co-evolve capabilities around a new innovation: they work cooperatively and competitively to support new products, satisfy customer needs, and eventually incorporate the next round of innovations.
  6. 6. Business Ecosystems
  7. 7. ELC#2 • Tradeshow ecosystem. Learn about the 10 broad service categories that comprise the ecosystem and produce 11,000 tradeshow in the US per year. Who are members and what do they do?
  8. 8. Tradeshow Ecosystem Today
  9. 9. By the Numbers • US hosts most number of tradeshows • 1.8M corporate and business meetings per annum • 11,094 meetings with conventions • 10,000 BTB tradeshows • Largest % hosted by hotels • $263B in spending • 1.7M US jobs • $106B contribution to GDP Source: The Economic Significance of Meeting to the US Economy
  10. 10. ELC#3 • US Ecosystem vs. Global ecosystems: Learn about the different global models; fractured and varied, consolidation is difficult but underway..
  11. 11. Global Expansion
  12. 12. Ecosystem Challenges in Emerging Countries • Economic strength • Currency stability • Convention facilities • Available square foot/meter capacity • Infrastructure • Ease of attendee travel • Transportation system • Corruption • Security • Tax rates and regulation • Work ethic
  13. 13. ELC#4 • Genesis of the US tradeshow ecosystem: formalized in the mid-1900’s as local service firms, created graphics, props, floats and decorations for national fairs and expositions. This system has evolved with business needs, wants and expectations.
  14. 14. Four distinct stages: 1.Birth expansion 2.Leadership 3.Self-renewal – or, 4.If not self-renewal, death.
  15. 15. Trade Show Birth (pix) Marketplaces Mercers Trade routes western europe Payment system Guilds Steam shipping vessels First World’s Fair, 1851, London machine assisted production rail transportation
  16. 16. Guilds flourish
  17. 17. 1851 Worlds Fair: Paris
  18. 18. First Auto Show: 1900
  19. 19. Trade Show Expansion (1900-1950s) (pix) Interest in sample fairs wane Shows reformed to narrow product/visitor base Tradeshow name coined to discern from consumer shows Trade associations form Mass manufacturing Unions formalize Commercial flights, 1930’s Interstate highway, 1956 General contractors proliferate
  20. 20. 1st Trade Association, 1883
  21. 21. Trade Show Leadership (1950-1980) (pix) Manufacturing and middle class Product Innovation Las Vegas launches new rotunda and 90,000 sf. Hall McCormick Place, 1st purpose built, 500,000 Tradeshow methodology TODAY: 1197 exhibition venues globally 32.6 million sq. m of indoor exhibition space
  22. 22. Original Las Vegas Convention Center
  23. 23. Original McCormick Place
  24. 24. ELC#5 • US GDP drives exposition growth: shows grow exponentially in the 1940’s due to industrial production expansion, product innovation, new distribution channels, faster and affordable modes of transportation, growth of middle class and consumer affluence and demand.
  25. 25. Tradeshow Renewel (video)
  26. 26. ELC#6 • Ecosystem member roles: once distinct roles are now blurring. Discover why? Is your tradeshow program aligned with the proper partner?
  27. 27. Big sea, many supplier fish Our Industry: Past
  28. 28. Big sea, shrinking supplier population, several big fish Our Industry: Present
  29. 29. Our Industry
  30. 30. Company Landscape
  31. 31. Trends Exhibitor: Quantifying and reporting value Ecosystem impact: tools to demonstrate/prove value Exhibitor: budgets flat at 39% of BTB Marketing Budget Ecosystem impact: doing more for less Exhibitor: aligning event portfolio Ecosystem impact: diversification Exhibitor: budget shift to rising operational expenses Ecosystem impact: service bundling a challenge
  32. 32. Exhibit Partner Trade-offs Small ($25M or less) 34-companies + - Big fish in a small pond Single location AE-centricity Resources Owner engagement Financial strength Buying power
  33. 33. Exhibit Partner Trade-offs Medium ($50-100M or less: 9 companies) + - Large client pond/diversity AE Exclusivity Team approach Consumption of resources by large clients Multiple offices Scale & Resources
  34. 34. Exhibit Partner Trade-offs Giant ($100M+: 6 ) + - Resource breadth and depth Overhead burden/expense Management structure Lots of balls in air Multi-location Large clients focus Buying power
  35. 35. ELC #8 • Environment challenges that will impact the ecosystem (US. and global): The list of challenges is long: Technology, Aging Population, Generational expectations, Security, Economic Strength, Security, Ease of attendee travel, Environmental impact, Transportation system, Sufficient housing , Corruption, Tax rates and regulations, Work ethic, Cost vs. value. Learn about how the ecosystem is adapting today and for the future.
  36. 36. Challenges Ahead Cost vs. value New buyer predispositions and expectations Quantifying and reporting value Buyer base consolidating Technology Aging Population Generational expectations Environmental impact Shift of key shows to emerging markets Shows smaller and more personalized
  37. 37. Where do we go from here?
  38. 38. Proper Alignment * B2B Expert Series: The Rise of the Digital Native 1980 Digital Immigrants Digital Natives
  39. 39. ELC #9 • The future ecosystem models: a hypothesis of what the future will bring to tradeshow ecosystems.
  40. 40. Appendix Insert any applicable appendices here: • Forms/Graphs • Suggested reading • Checklists • Bibliography • Additional reference material Use additional slides if needed
  41. 41. Formatting for the Handout • When you are ready to send this file in as your handout, go to File, then Print. In the bottom left corner under Print What, change the first dialog box from Slides to Handouts. Then under Handouts, choose 2 slides per page. You can then choose PDF or Adobe as your printer choice in the Printer Name dialog box. Then save your file. • Remove this slide prior to printing!

×