February 2010 Cultural IQ Newsletter

375 views

Published on

Your feedback on program - "China Update" is highly appreciated.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
375
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
19
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

February 2010 Cultural IQ Newsletter

  1. 1. Cultural IQ In this Issue Newsletter 1) Largest gift to Yale Business School by Zhang Lei 2) “Snail House” – TV Drama hot in Fostering Connections, Illuminating Insights China 3) Upcoming Event – “China Update” Issue # 9, February, 2010     Zhang Lei donates USD8,888,888 to Yale University Management School    Yale President Richard Levin announced on Jan.4th 2010 that Zhang Lei, MBA’02,  GRD’02 has pledged the largest gift to the Yale School of Management by a  graduate of the school. Zhang’s pledge, made less than 10 years after his  graduation from Yale, also represents the largest gift to date from a young Yale  University Alumnus. Zhang Lei, the founder and managing partner of Hillhouse  Capital Management, will give USD8,888,888 primarily to help build Yale SOM’s  new campus. A portion of the gift will provide scholarly support for the  International Relations Program at Yale’s New Jackson Institute of Global Affairs,  as well as funding for a variety of China‐related activities at Yale University.     There has been lot of discussions ever since this news was released. I have noticed  several details that are interesting.     Firstly, the amount of this gift, USD8,888,888, represents careful consideration  and well‐intention of Zhang Lei. Since in China, number “8” represents good luck,  fortune, success. In fact, all the digits of this pledge are “8”, telling us that Zhang Lei wants this gift to bring  success, fortune to Yale. I wonder if Yale appreciates the meaning of choosing all these “8”.     Secondly, Zhang Lei, a 2002 graduate, now at late thirties, achieved tremendous success at least financially  during the short period of less than 10 years after his graduation. It is said that he was originally from Hunan  Province, a very smart student when he studied in China. He said it was Yale that changed his life.     No doubt, Zhang Lei was one of the beneficiaries of Yale’s  educational system. In fact, his gratitude and emotional connections  is well presented in the name he gave to the Capital Management  fund – Hillhouse, which is the name of the famous and beautiful  Hillhouse Avenue at Yale.     Some Chinese comment that he should donate the money to  Chinese educational institutions since there are millions of kids out  of school in China. In my opinion, it’s everyone’s discretion as to  where and how he/she chooses to allocate their money. I thing  Zhang has done a great thing, in that he is a person of gratitude, and  he is sharing his fortune with people; he is willing to help and  support other people from a higher cause. I believe he should be  applauded for his act of giving.  
  2. 2. Snail House  – Television Drama hot in China    A recent television drama receives attention and controversial comments, even from a review with Toronto  Star. According to a Star article titled “Show about house prices irks Chinese leadership” on Jan. 21st,  (http://www.thestar.com/news/world/china/article/753651‐‐tv‐drama‐too‐real‐for‐beijing) this TV series tells  harsh  truth about contemporary China that the government has called a stop to the broadcast of it through  major TV channels.     I watched the complete 35 series during Christmas holidays at home. The story is about two sisters, both were  graduated from top universities in Shanghai. Although they are only several years apart, to me, they represent  two generations. The older sister, Hai Ping, worked hard with her husband, planning to own their own  property in Shanghai. She counted every penny to save, in order to pay down payment of an apartment.  However, with the increasing of real estate property price in Shanghai (in fact, China!), Hai Ping’s savings and  salary couldn’t match the real estate price increase. She had no other option except tightening further the  budget of expenses and becoming more and more restless with her daily life.     The younger sister, Hai Zao, just graduated from university, found a job as office assistant to a small real estate  developer. One of the job requirements was to develop relationships with government officials so that her  boss could get favorable projects from the government. Between a boyfriend who loved her very much, and a  middle‐aged government corrupt who seems to have all kinds of resources that could solve Hai Zao’s  problems, she chose to become her mistress, living in a huge apartment and was about to give birth to his  child.    Hai Ping and Hai Zao’s lives, their  dreams, desires, love, and choices are  real, typical of the people who live in  cosmopolitans like Shanghai, Beijing,  Guangzhou. I believe the reason this TV  series become popular is partly because  people can relate to their stories easily,  people find Hai Ping and Hai Zao as their  colleagues, neighbors or even sisters…..     Are their choices right or wrong?  Different people have different  standards and answers. Or maybe lot of  questions in life don’t have one answer.      
  3. 3. Upcoming events – “China Update” Hi Everyone,     I am planning to host a bi‐weekly workshop series called “China Update” 中国观察.    China is playing a more and more critical role in the world stage, and because of this, I am constantly updating  myself on various aspects of what’s happening there, the interactions, trends, opportunities, etc.     At the same time, I hope to provide an alternate voice and perspective which maybe different from the  Western media.  My reason is simple: You need to hear both sides of the story.     Regarding contents, it is my intention to cover the social, political and businesses aspects including: hot topics,  trends, people, ideas, events, and potential opportunities.    I would like feedback from anyone who is interested on the following:  1)  Do you prefer this workshop to be face‐to‐face? Or Teleclass? Webinar? Any good types of media that  you suggest?   2)  How often do you suggest we hold this workshop?  3)  What other topics or contents do you suggest to cover?  4)  If you are interested to join, how many sessions do you commit to come?    Any other suggestions are most welcome!  Look forward to your valuable feedback.    Thank you,  Christine Gao    Warmest regards  Christine Gao, M.Ed, PCC  President,   Cultural IQ, Fostering Connections, Embracing Diversity  christine@culturaliq.com    

×