Radio in a museological context

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Presenting radio as immaterial media heritage and the concept of scaffolding in exhibition design to bridge the knowledge gap between the modern audience and historic radio heritage.

Slides from my presentation at the IAMHIST Conference in Copenhagen July 7 2011.

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Radio in a museological context

  1. 1. IAMHIST CONFERENCE, COPENHAGEN JULY 7 2011RADIO IN A MUSEOLOGICAL CONTEXT<br />By<br />Christian Hviid Mortensen<br />University of Southern Denmark<br />
  2. 2. ME<br />Curator at the MEDIA MUSEUM in Odense, Denmark.<br />www.brandts.dk<br />Ph.d.-fellow at the Intitute of Litterature, Media and Cultural Studies, University of Southern Denmark.<br />Part of the LARM: Audio Research Archive Project.<br />www.larm-archive.org<br />Affiliatedwith DREAM (Danish Research Center onEducation and Advanced Media Materials).<br />www.dream.dk<br />
  3. 3. MUSEUM FUNCTIONSfor electronic and digital media products<br />Aquire<br />Conserve<br />Research<br />Communicate<br />Exhibit<br /><ul><li>Libraries & DR
  4. 4. Libraries & DR
  5. 5. Universities
  6. 6. Libraries & DR
  7. 7. The Media Museum</li></li></ul><li>SCAFFOLDING I<br />More often than not, it involves a kind of “scaffolding” process that enables a child or novice to solve a problem, carry out a task or achieve a goal which would be beyond his unassisted efforts. This scaffolding consists essentially of the adult [e.g. the curator] “controlling” those elements of the task that are initially beyond the learner‟s capacity, thus permitting him to concentrate upon and complete only those elements that are within his range of competence .<br />(Wood, Bruner, Ross, 1976, p. 90) <br />
  8. 8. SCAFFOLDING II<br />Recruitment: <br />We have to get the audience’s attention. Why should I listen to this?<br />Reduction in degrees of freedom: <br />Only give the audience a few entrances to the subject matter. If they can browse in the entire archive of the Danish Broadcast Corporation they would not know where to start.<br />Direction maintenance: <br />We have to keep the audience motivated and keeping the discovery process flowing. Thus keep the audio segments short.<br />
  9. 9. SCAFFOLDING III<br />Marking critical features: <br />Make the audience focused in their listening by providing hints as to what they should listen for.<br />Frustration control: <br />Navigation through the exhibition should be intuitive and user friendly.<br />Demonstration: <br />Give some of the highlights to those in the audience to impatient to listen through it all thus perhaps inspiring them to listen some more.<br />
  10. 10. EXHIBITION IDEAS I<br />Situated radio: <br />How radio content and the listening situation are and have beeninterdependent.<br />Rebel Radio: <br />A sound installation about the struggleagainstauthorityon-site in a square in Copenhagen.<br />
  11. 11. EXHIBITION IDEAS II<br />Barber ChairSoundscapes: Travelthrough time in a barber chairwhilebrowsingmagazines.<br />A yet to bedefindedexhibitionprojectwith the Rock Museum in Roskilde, Denmark.<br />
  12. 12. RADIOCURATOR.WORDPRESS.COM<br />
  13. 13. Thankyouforlistening.<br />

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