ILTA141
Introduction to Learning, Teaching and Assessment
Chrissi Nerantzi
Academic Developer
Manchester
Metropolitan
Univ...
deepening reflection
describing
feeling
analysing
reasoning
stepping back
being self-critical
exploring options
linking to...
#ILTA141
Large & small group teaching
• Delivering interactive lectures
• Classroom management techniques in action
• The ...
first things first! If you have a smart phone or tablet with you,
please download the free Socrative app
(student version)...
Learning outcomes
• Discuss strategies for managing a large and
small group
• Plan a short session of teaching for a large...
What I would like you to take away
to be open to new approaches, to be creative, reflect on practice and try new things
Wh...
Three main theories of teaching in HE
Theory 3: Teaching as
making learning possible
– SELF-DIRECTED
teaching is cooperati...
How large is large?
a. 30 +
b. 50 +
c. 100 +
Let’s try this
together!
Access your (brand new) socrative app and type in room:
chrissinerantzi
Use short question format...
6
principles
of
effective
teaching
in HE
1. Interest and
explanation
2. Concern and respect
for students and
student learn...
7 principles of
good practice in
undergraduate
education
• Encourages contacts
between students and
faculty.
• Develops re...
How do you feel
when you teach large
& small groups?
in pairs: use sticky notes
origami: let’s make something ;o)
NOT boats!!!
Does size matter?
Benefits Challenges
Large-group/ Small-group teaching
Task (10 mins): Share findings with the other group.
Capture thought...
video clips
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=25525
Task: Watch, observe and comment (what did
you like, what could b...
We are all different!
”They (teachers) should not feel compelled to
adopt a persona that is unnatural or seems to
go again...
Simple tips
Environment
Plan ahead:
• Late arrivals
• Early departures
• Talking
• Mobile phones
What’s your strategy?
pairs
• not groups
• difficult for
one member
to be
completely in
active
threes
• small enough
to avoid the
risk of “shy
v...
Create a nano session
(5 minutes) in small groups
• Choose a topic which you think students find
difficult
• Produce a sho...
Threshold Concepts? (Meyer & Land, 2003)
• Certain concepts are held to be central to the mastery of a subject
• They have...
Donald Clark: Don’t lecture me!
from delivering to facilitating(flipped classroom Aaron Sams,
and Jonathan Bergmann , PBL ...
source: Jeff Dunn: The 8 Characteristics Of A 21st Century Teacher
http://edudemic.com/2013/04/the-8-characteristics-of-a-...
“College is a place where a professor’s lecture
notes go straight to the students’ lecture
notes, without passing through ...
One minute paper
Write down ONE thing
you’re going to do in your
microteaching as a result
of today’s session
Resources
Bligh, D. (2000). What's the Use of Lectures? San Francisco,
Jossey-Bass.
Gibbs, G. (1981, 11/07/2006 18:49:34)....
References
Chickering, A. W. & Gamson, Z. F. (1987) "Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate
education" Americ...
#ILTA141 Large and small group teaching with Chrissi Nerantzi and Haleh Moravej
#ILTA141 Large and small group teaching with Chrissi Nerantzi and Haleh Moravej
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#ILTA141 Large and small group teaching with Chrissi Nerantzi and Haleh Moravej

  1. 1. ILTA141 Introduction to Learning, Teaching and Assessment Chrissi Nerantzi Academic Developer Manchester Metropolitan University, UK @chrissinerantzi Haleh Moravej Senior Lecturer in Nutrition Science Manchester Metropolitan University, UK @halehmoravej
  2. 2. deepening reflection describing feeling analysing reasoning stepping back being self-critical exploring options linking to action own perspective link to theory colleagues students Brookfield Critical Lenses Critical reflection: “... the process by which we research the assumptions informing our own practice by viewing these through four complementary lenses – the lenses of our students’ eyes, colleagues’ perceptions, literature and our own autobiography. [...] Finally, we can review our personal autobiographies as learners so that we can make visceral connections to, and gain a better understanding of, the pleasures and terrors our own students are experiencing.” (Brookfield, 2006, 26)
  3. 3. #ILTA141 Large & small group teaching • Delivering interactive lectures • Classroom management techniques in action • The lecture challenge • Establishing an inclusive and international classroom • Supporting student learning through group-based activities • Group work
  4. 4. first things first! If you have a smart phone or tablet with you, please download the free Socrative app (student version) now! Available for Apple and Android devices ;) Student version!!!
  5. 5. Learning outcomes • Discuss strategies for managing a large and small group • Plan a short session of teaching for a large and/or small group • Discuss peer observation of teaching
  6. 6. What I would like you to take away to be open to new approaches, to be creative, reflect on practice and try new things What would you like you to take away
  7. 7. Three main theories of teaching in HE Theory 3: Teaching as making learning possible – SELF-DIRECTED teaching is cooperative learning to help students change their understanding. It focuses on critical barriers to student learning (Threshold Concepts – Meyer and Land, 2003) Learning is applying and modifying one’s own ideas; it is something the student does, rather than something that is done to the student. Teaching is speculative and reflective, teaching activities are context- related, uncertain and continuously improvable. (Ramsden, 2003, 108-112) Theory 1: Teaching as telling, transmission or delivery - PASSIVE students are passive recipients of the wisdom of a single speaker – all problems reside outside the lecturer Theory 2: Teaching as organising or facilitating student activity - ACTIVE students are active – problems shared
  8. 8. How large is large? a. 30 + b. 50 + c. 100 +
  9. 9. Let’s try this together! Access your (brand new) socrative app and type in room: chrissinerantzi Use short question format: class to decide!
  10. 10. 6 principles of effective teaching in HE 1. Interest and explanation 2. Concern and respect for students and student learning 3. Appropriate assessment and feedback 4. Clear goals and intellectual challenge 5. Independence, control and engagement 6. Learning from students (Ramsden, 2003)
  11. 11. 7 principles of good practice in undergraduate education • Encourages contacts between students and faculty. • Develops reciprocity and cooperation among students. • Uses active learning techniques. • Gives prompt feedback. • Emphasizes time on task. • Communicates high expectations. • Respects diverse talents and ways of learning. (Chickering & Gamson, 1987) 6 powerful forces in education •Activity •Expectations •Cooperation •Interaction •Diversity •Responsibility
  12. 12. How do you feel when you teach large & small groups? in pairs: use sticky notes
  13. 13. origami: let’s make something ;o) NOT boats!!!
  14. 14. Does size matter?
  15. 15. Benefits Challenges Large-group/ Small-group teaching Task (10 mins): Share findings with the other group. Capture thoughts on post-it notes and add to the flipcharts
  16. 16. video clips http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=25525 Task: Watch, observe and comment (what did you like, what could be improved and why)
  17. 17. We are all different! ”They (teachers) should not feel compelled to adopt a persona that is unnatural or seems to go against the grain of his or her personality” (Light et al 2009:124)
  18. 18. Simple tips
  19. 19. Environment Plan ahead: • Late arrivals • Early departures • Talking • Mobile phones What’s your strategy?
  20. 20. pairs • not groups • difficult for one member to be completely in active threes • small enough to avoid the risk of “shy violets” • big enough to bring together more experience than a pair. • disadvantage can be two ganging against one. fours • still small for everyone to contribute – this is the preferred group size! • disadvantage group might split into two pairs • no case vote if pairs disagree how to approach a task. fives • large enough to have the “odd passenger” or “bystander” – getting away without contributing much to the group work. sixes and more • the main danger is passenger behaviours or non- participation. Grouping and size Phil Race: In at the deep-end: starting to teach in higher education, Leeds Metropolitan University
  21. 21. Create a nano session (5 minutes) in small groups • Choose a topic which you think students find difficult • Produce a short script and one PowerPoint slide • Include an opportunity for interaction • Choose one person to present • 30 mins prep, then we’ll meet back here for the nano sessions • Feedback using the observation form • Discussion
  22. 22. Threshold Concepts? (Meyer & Land, 2003) • Certain concepts are held to be central to the mastery of a subject • They have the following features: – Transformative: Once understood, a threshold concept changes the way in which the student views the discipline. – Troublesome: Threshold concepts are likely to be troublesome for the student. e.g when it is counter−intuitive. – Irreversible: They are difficult to unlearn. – Integrative: Threshold concepts, once learned, are likely to bring together different aspects of the subject that previously did not appear, to the student, to be related. – Bounded: A threshold concept will probably delineate a particular conceptual space, serving a specific and limited purpose. – Discursive: Crossing of a threshold will incorporate an enhanced and extended use of language. 25
  23. 23. Donald Clark: Don’t lecture me! from delivering to facilitating(flipped classroom Aaron Sams, and Jonathan Bergmann , PBL etc.) from isolation to conversation, collaboration, questioning, connecting, networking, negotiating from passive to active from just low or no-tech to also high-tech from one for all to personalisation from just in-class to everywhere and anytime
  24. 24. source: Jeff Dunn: The 8 Characteristics Of A 21st Century Teacher http://edudemic.com/2013/04/the-8-characteristics-of-a-21st-century-teacher/
  25. 25. “College is a place where a professor’s lecture notes go straight to the students’ lecture notes, without passing through the brains of either.” Mark Twain
  26. 26. One minute paper Write down ONE thing you’re going to do in your microteaching as a result of today’s session
  27. 27. Resources Bligh, D. (2000). What's the Use of Lectures? San Francisco, Jossey-Bass. Gibbs, G. (1981, 11/07/2006 18:49:34). "Twenty terrible reasons for lecturing." Retrieved November 2006, from http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/ocsd/2_learntch/20reaso ns.html. Huxham, M. (2005). "Learning in lectures: Do 'interactive windows' help?" Active Learning in Higher Education 6(1): 17- 31. Race, P. (2005). Making Learning Happen: A guide for Post- Compulsory Education, Sage http://alh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/6/1/17 http://www.celt.mmu.ac.uk/lectures/
  28. 28. References Chickering, A. W. & Gamson, Z. F. (1987) "Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education" American Association of Higher Education Bulletin vol.39 no.7 pp.3-7 Light,G., Cox, R. and Calkins. S (2009) Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, The Reflective Professional, London: Sage Publications. Meyer, J.H.F. and Land, R. (2003) Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge: linkages to ways of thinking and practising, In: Rust, C. (ed.), Improving Student Learning - Theory and Practice Ten Years On. Oxford: Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development (OCSLD), pp 412-424. Palmer, P. J. (2007) The Courage to Teach. Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Race, P. (2009) In at the deep-end: starting to teach in higher education, Leeds Metropolitan University Ramsden, P (2003) Learning to teach in Higher Education, Oxon: RoutledgeFalmer.

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