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Frank Strategy e- Info@frankstrategy.ca
115 – 119 West Pender St p- 604 816 9766
Vancouver, BC
V6B 1S5
Canada
Secondary Re...
Frank Strategy e- Info@frankstrategy.ca
115 – 119 West Pender St p- 604 816 9766
Vancouver, BC
V6B 1S5
Canada
Table of Con...
2
Introduction
As Marilynjean.com plans its move to the US, Frank Advertising is looking for
information to help articulat...
3
Key Learning & Insights
1. The US mom tends to be 20-34, and over index to non-Caucasian - primarily
Hispanic/African Am...
4
7. As one would expect, the fact that the products will be used by the babies
implies ultimate care is taken to purchase...
5
Detailed Discussion
Section 1 - What We Know About The Target
According to the US census, there are currently just over ...
6
Socioeconomics
US Moms may be working or full time homemakers, but they skew towards
women with large families and sligh...
7
Detailed analysis:
 Based on advertising content analysis, messages that speak to parents are
centered around family, a...
8
Media Use & Consumption
Moms' media consumption skews to magazines, OOH, and slightly to
internet.
Implications: There m...
9
Section 2 - The Buying Cycle and the Sweet Spot
There seems to be two main buying cycles of baby products, with the
prim...
10
Section 3 – The Research & Buying Process
As one would expect, the fact that the products will be used by the babies
im...
11
Section 4 - The Economic Opportunity
A lot of money is spent in a relatively short period to prepare for a new baby
($7...
12
Section 5 – What & How Parents are Buying
Big ticket items are key (strollers and car seats for example) and parents
cl...
13
Procter & Gamble, California Baby, Synutra, Mead Johnson Nutrition, Kao,
Babies"R"Us, Pampers, Beech-Nut Nutrition, Uni...
14
Section 7 – What About Online Shopping?
Key advantages of online shopping for baby products include tandem
research and...
15
Detailed analysis:
 Independent website toptenreviews.com rated the top online baby stores for
2012. They looked at mu...
16
APPENDIX I - Sources
1. PMB (Print Measurement Bureau) 2012 Fall profile and media data for Canadian
mothers of childre...
17
APPENDIX II – Verbatim from Qualitative Email Survey
Q. Which stage of maternity or early parenthood involved most purc...
18
Around 2nd and 3rd trimester. Around 12-18 months
We did a big round of purchases late in my pregnancy...largely preppi...
19
For clothes - gap, old navy and gymboree because of the selection and constant sales. for
baby needs, walmart, supersto...
20
Yes, ease of buying from home, price
I did cross-border online shopping only when I wanted to buy many products at a ti...
21
We liked earth's best for formula and cereal. (until the age of 1)
we love melissa and doug
toys (from 1 - now)
Baby ei...
22
APPENDIX III – Amazon.com Baby Products - Top 5 Sellers by Category
(Oct 5, 2012)
Bathing/Skin care
#1 #2 #3 #4 #5
Pamp...
23
Furniture
#1 #2 #3 #4 #5
Carter's Keep
Me Dry
Waterproof
Fitted Quilted
Crib Pad, White
Safety 1st
Heavenly
Dreams Whit...
24
Potty Training
#1 #2 #3 #4 #5
Pampers Easy
Ups Trainers,
Value Pack,
Girl, Size 4
S2T/3T, 100
Count
Pampers Easy
Ups Bo...
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Research Report Example - Frank Strategy

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This secondary research report was compiled for an early stage client intending to sell maternity and baby products in the US. They had a stable but small customer base in Canada and were interested to scale up to address a US market. Inevitably, the company changed direction as a result of this exercise (which also included primary research, competitive analysis, market testing and business planning). Instead of focussing on limited time sales, which was saturated in the US and had limited appeal, they instead focussed on helping the mother make good purchase decisions. The client adopted a content marketing strategy instead of a PPC strategy, which added stability and authenticity. They also focussed the brand around helping mums be good mums, rather than merely 'cheap and fast' clothing.

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Research Report Example - Frank Strategy

  1. 1. Frank Strategy e- Info@frankstrategy.ca 115 – 119 West Pender St p- 604 816 9766 Vancouver, BC V6B 1S5 Canada Secondary Research Report Baby Products in the US Market October 2012
  2. 2. Frank Strategy e- Info@frankstrategy.ca 115 – 119 West Pender St p- 604 816 9766 Vancouver, BC V6B 1S5 Canada Table of Contents Page Introduction & Methodology 2 Key Learning & Insights 3 Detailed Discussion 5 Appendix I – Sources 16 Appendix II - Verbatim from Qualitative Email Survey 17 Appendix III - Amazon.com Baby Products - Top 5 Sellers by Category 23
  3. 3. 2 Introduction As Marilynjean.com plans its move to the US, Frank Advertising is looking for information to help articulate their brand and focus targeting in the US. The required information can be summarized into the following two pillars: Target Market:  Size & opportunity; demographic, socioeconomic and psychographic profile, buying power. Buying Behaviour & Attitudes:  When require new products  What products are bought at different stages of baby age  Where products are bought from  How products are bought (purchase process and channels)  Other aspects of the purchase process  Any attitudes towards baby products as well as towards companies, websites and brands offering them Methodology Given the scope of the communications program, secondary research was deemed the most appropriate methodology at this stage. This report presents learning from this exercise. The reader is reminded that secondary research has key limitations, including:  Data will not be available from one source only and some data points may be contradictory or not comparable to others;  There may sometimes not be enough (or any) information on some of the information requirements; and,  Some of the sources may not be reliable, yet are the only ones providing the required information. A total of 41 sources were screened as providing relevant information and were used in this analysis (please see Appendix I). In addition, a qualitative email survey was forwarded to a convenient sample of recent moms across Canada and the US. 20 moms responded and these responses were incorporated into this analysis. Verbatim comments from those surveys are found in Appendix II. The following pages outline the learning from this exercise. Additional supporting information are appended.
  4. 4. 3 Key Learning & Insights 1. The US mom tends to be 20-34, and over index to non-Caucasian - primarily Hispanic/African American (half of the 2011 US births are of visible minority). She is most likely living in the West/South West USA. She tends to be either working or a full time homemaker, helping support a large family but with lower net worth and income than the rest of the US population. While more and more women are having babies later in life, the ‘volume’ of moms in the US remains women in their late twenties/early thirties, with some special attention to minority groups. Visible minorities (Hispanics, blacks, Asians) accounted for 50.4% of US births in 2011 and 49.7% of all children under 5 (census bureau data). Minorities make up only a quarter to a third of the US population so definitely the skew is among newborn Americans. This is a result of a greater share of the minority population is of child bearing age (median age of Hispanics is 27.6 years while median age of a US Caucasian is 42 years) 2. The mom, as opposed to the parents, seems to be the most appropriate target to capture given the increasing proportion of mom’s who are unmarried. In addition, the decisions on what to buy are made by the mom who seems to decide on what to buy with money given as gifts and/or what goes on the baby registry. 3. There seems to be two main buying cycles of baby products, with the primary being around pregnancy/newborn and the second (albeit less intense) around the time the child is 12 – 24 months old. Targeting by pregnancy as opposed to motherhood may be most effective given (a) the kind of products Marilynjean.com carries that tend to be purchased months prior to baby arrival, (b) the lighter bombardment of marketing and promotional material (those tend to happen as soon as the baby is born and records of newborn become public) and (c) creation of trial that will translate into repeat purchase once the second batch of purchasing takes place. 4. A lot of money is spent in a relatively short period to prepare for a new baby ($7K-$14K in the first year), particularly for first-time parents who are more likely to over-spend. Spending variations seem to be driven not necessarily by age of child but by whether she is a first time mother or not – first time mothers tend to spend more on baby products given novelty, need t o demonstrate to herself that she is looking after the child and less opportunity for hand-me-downs. 5. Mom’s media consumption skews to magazines, OOH, and slightly to internet. As such, there may be a need to reach moms via more than online (i.e., multiple-touch points), but keep in mind that these mothers get bombarded with marketing materials. The ability of communications to be appealing, relevant and helpful are key to break through the communications clutter these moms face. 6. Moms are family centric, with a strong emotional connection to their child, and seek to build lasting memories. They are looking forward to the rewards of being a parent and tend to appreciate the humor in many parenting situations. New moms do not seem to feel parenting is easy and they are under stress. However, this does not seem to create a barrier to express feelings of love, openness and concern for their children.
  5. 5. 4 7. As one would expect, the fact that the products will be used by the babies implies ultimate care is taken to purchase the right, safe and cost effective product. As such, the purchase process is complex and involves multiple sources of information, and parents are doing a lot of research before buying. A site that is streamlined, facilitates the buying process and provides access to information including product reviews, peer discussions, and technical information on the products will be key. 8. Taking into account the mom’s socio-economic profile, the time pressures she is under, her attitudes towards parenting and the complexity of the purchase process; the key drivers to get mom’s attention are: a. Value for money (quality for the price, not price in absolute given these are products for the precious babies) b. Convenience/ease of shopping c. Stress-free shopping in terms of ease of finding the products one is looking for and learning what they need to know about these products (e.g., product reviews) d. Ability to easily connect with communities of other moms (via reviews, discussion forums, etc.) 9. In terms of products bought, the spending (in order of volume) goes to: formula/foods, furnishings, clothes, diapers, strollers, toys, nursing and baby feeding products, health and grooming. While the most popular items on registries include car seats, strollers, baby feeding products, diapers, health and grooming care, do not ignore smaller items such as teething toys, sound toys, changing pads, eating aids. 10. Brand choice is also key. While it was difficult finding top selling brands given the fragmentation of the products bought for babies, parents are seeking brands that reflect quality, style, assurance of safety and that can make a statement. They look for brands they trust, can connect with emotionally and perceive to deliver on the key drivers of quality, style and functionality. As such, a carefully curated selection of products will be key. While there are references to green baby products, style, functionality and brand trust may still trump ‘green’ in this category. 11. Online shopping is popular and most likely a preference given its key advantages of tandem research and buying, customer reviews, and ease of shopping – the latter a key driver for the busy parent. However, given the importance of time and ease of shopping, it is not surprising to see why brick- and-mortar retailers still offer relevant advantages including service, ease of returns, instant gratification and try before you buy. Enhancing the online shopping experience with reviews, articles, accurate sizing guidelines and how-to info and making online returns easy, quick and cheap shipping options become key pillars for online only offering. 12. In line with the above, the top rated online stores are (Amazon, BabyAge, Babies"R"Us). What those have in common is that they excel in price, website ease-of-use, free/cheap shipping options, speed of shipping and offering a broad selection.
  6. 6. 5 Detailed Discussion Section 1 - What We Know About The Target According to the US census, there are currently just over 4 million babies born in the US each year. Who is having these babies? It is first important to note that having a baby is universal. That is, people from all races, regions, income brackets, education levels, etc, can and do have babies in the US every year. That said, there are some skews noted for households with young children (under 3). Having said this, it is also important to remember the age of the child may be the more important targeting metric, as this ties to buying cycles more than age and other characteristics of the mom – more on this later in the report. Demographics The biggest group of moms skew females 20-34, of an ethnic origin (primarily Hispanic/African American), and most likely live in the West/South West USA. Implications: Despite women having children at an older age year over year, the ‘volume’ of moms in the US remains women in their late twenties/early thirties, with some special attention to minority groups. Detailed analysis:  Moms skew female with a younger family, married couple, though there is also a notable proportion (about 1/3 of new moms per census data) who are not currently married. As such, it will be important to keep these single moms in mind, as they represent about 10 million moms (source #6).  Moms generally skew younger, with an over index to 20-34 and a concentrated skew in the 25-34 range.  About 10% of women ages 20-34 have had a child in the past year, with about a third of these being their first child (US census). By the time women are 40, about 80% have given birth (source #4). However, the bulk of current moms of children under 3 remain within the 20 – 34 age bracket.  Moms skew to minority groups in the US, including Hispanic/Latino, African American, and to a lesser extent Asian. Of note, African American and Hispanic women tend to have their first child slightly earlier - i.e. 18-19 years old - than other races (source #7). Over the period from July 2010-2011, more than half the US newborns were of ethnic or racial minorities (source #10). Some special attention to these minority groups in terms of market ing placement/materials/messaging is likely warranted in this case, as the proportion of births to minorities has risen over the past decade. However, it is also important to note that Caucasians make up the majority of the US population.  Regional skew towards the Western US - SouthWest, Pacific and Mountain regions specifically. Northeastern states have the lowest birth rates per number of women. Utah has the highest birth rate, Vermont the lowest. In absolute numbers, California, Texas and New York are the states with the most births per year, presumably due to large population sizes.
  7. 7. 6 Socioeconomics US Moms may be working or full time homemakers, but they skew towards women with large families and slightly lower education, net worth and income than the rest of the US population, perhaps due to their age (and skews to ethnic minorities). Implications: Price/Value and convenience/ease of shopping will be key for any offer to US moms given their limited time and funds. Detailed analysis:  Moms tend to have slightly lower education levels, particularly fewer women with advanced degrees. This could be, in part, due to these families being younger and not yet having the school experience to realize these advanced degrees, and/or those working towards advanced degrees have put off raising a child in order to attain their degree.  Moms tend to be working, temporarily out of the workforce, or homemakers. Two in three moms worked through their pregnancy, and of these, most worked up to the month before giving birth (source #6). About half of new moms were back to work within 6 months of giving birth (source #6). This supports the importance of making baby product shopping easy and convenient.  Despite working moms, they skew to slightly lower income bracket ($30- $35K), along with a skew in the mid/upper ($60-$74K), along with a lower net worth overall. Similar to education status, this could be in part due to the families simply being younger in general.  Moms skew to home renters. If they own their home, it is a lower value home.  Moms tend to be the principal shopper for the house. As well, females account for the vast majority of consumer product purchases in general, so appealing to moms (as opposed to the ‘parents’) will be key.  Moms tend to live as part of larger families of 3-8 people (1-5 kids in HH, with at least one under 3 years old). Given their age, it is not surprising to see them likely to also have 3-5 and/or 6-11 year olds in the HH, though less likely to have any teens (12-17 years old) in the house. They also are less likely to have a pet in the house. Psychographics Moms are family centric, with a strong emotional connection to their child, and seek to build lasting memories. They are looking forward to the rewards of being a parent, and tend to appreciate the humor in many parenting situations. Implications: Interestingly, most women feel advertisers don't understand them (source #26), so an emotional connection in line with their psychographic profile is key in the content and look and feel of the brand and communications.
  8. 8. 7 Detailed analysis:  Based on advertising content analysis, messages that speak to parents are centered around family, and offer strong emotional elements parents can understand, relate to, and find engaging. It is not surprising that many baby product ads utilize cute, happy babies as a way to create instant emotional response and engagement.  Forming a strong bond with their children and new memories that will last a lifetime are important, and advertisers certainly tap into this idea - showing images from first birthdays, etc.  Having a new baby generally seems to bring hope and the feeling of a new beginning to parents. This sense of newness and hope may also translate into being open to new experiences, even in relation to brand trial.  New parents seem to appreciate that along with the hard work of parenting, there are rich rewards and even a funny side of parenting. Some ads tap into this humor aspect well, such as Huggies 'Office' ad or their 'Sock puppet' ad from a few years ago. Humor, when used well and integrated into the story can help engage the audience and generate lasting impressions.  "The joy of having children" was the most cited reason for parents deciding to have kids. That said, just under half also said, "There wasn't a reason; it just happened" (source #3). Attitudes New moms do not seem to feel parenting is easy and they are under stress. However, this does not seem to create a barrier to express feelings of love, openness and concern for their children. Implications: In addition to price and convenience, stress free shopping and tools to connect with communities of other moms (via reviews, discussion forums, etc.) are key to connect with any baby product offer, including distribution/retailers. Detailed analysis:  About one in two mothers said they had a child when they were ready (source #4). On the other hand, this means that half the mothers in US do not feel ready. Many sources state that new parents are baffled, stressed, overwhelmed and want some help. As such, anything that can be offered to help navigate the research/buying of baby related products may serve Marilynjean.com well.  While new parents seem under stress, they also seem very open and loving. These are important emotional platforms to bring into in any messaging.  Great concern for their children in all ways (baby's health, how to parent, what to buy) appears to be universal. Parents seem to crave information that will help them be better parents.  New moms seek the camaraderie and advice of other moms, either in person or online, through forums and blogs. Having a baby seems to offer opportunities for forming new/larger communities/circles of friends.  While new moms do seek advice from others, many also seem quite opinionated in terms of parenting styles and products they buy and trust. Brand ambassadors may be an important element during the US launch.
  9. 9. 8 Media Use & Consumption Moms' media consumption skews to magazines, OOH, and slightly to internet. Implications: There may be a need to reach moms via more than online (multiple-touch points), but keep in mind that these mothers get bombarded with marketing materials. Detailed analysis:  The media consumption of residents in households with babies skews to magazines, out of home (e.g. billboards), and slightly to internet. This suggests non-traditional/secondary medias should play an important role in any campaign designed to target this audience.  This group skews towards less TV watching (including primetime), and also less newspaper reading.  In general, campaigns that utilize multiple, synergistic touch-points produce the strongest results. This may be particularly true in this category, given the complex buying process for consumers shopping the category.  Because births are public record, families with newborns are typically bombarded with marketing materials, special offers, etc (source #13). This likely creates a very cluttered advertising environment in the category, which means any creative has to be very strong and compelling in order to break though and be noticed. Further, this may suggest targeting those who are pregnant but have not yet had their baby, and/or those with toddlers (e.g. 1- 2 years old), may be a viable option if a somewhat less fragmented/cluttered advertising environment is a central element of the marketing strategy.
  10. 10. 9 Section 2 - The Buying Cycle and the Sweet Spot There seems to be two main buying cycles of baby products, with the primary being around pregnancy/newborn and the second (albeit less intense) around the time the child is 12 – 24 months old. September is the most popular month for newborn babies, followed by August, June, and July, respectively (source #6). Strong buying cycles will likely align 3-6 months prior to these months (mainly Winter/Spring months), given the buying cycle data found in the next section. Implications: Targeting by pregnancy as opposed to motherhood may be most effective given (a) the kind of products Marilynjean.com carries that tend to be purchased months prior to baby arrival, (b) the lighter bombardment of marketing and promotional material (those tend to happen as soon as baby is born and records of newborn become public) and (c) it could create trial that will translate into repeat purchase once the second batch of purchasing takes place. Detailed analysis: 1. Pregnancy/Birth  The second trimester of pregnancy is when most expectant mothers begin buying baby items (source #13 and our online survey). This means awareness should likely come before this time, so these shoppers will be looking at/shopping on Marilynjean.com.  This first buying cycle is when most items are being purchased, as the parents prepare for the birth. There are many necessities purchased at this stage, but our qualitative survey also suggests that bigger ticket items, perhaps even some non-essential ones, are easier to justify earlier in the pregnancy, as the reality of the cost of raising a child has not yet set in fully.  Once the baby is born... "new parents’ habits are more flexible than at almost any other time in their adult lives." (source #13) This suggests this is the time where the most opportunity lies for building trial and loyalty. Intuitively, the brand affinities/loyalties built at this stage can potentially impact decisions for the family (both parents and kids) for years. 2. 1-2 Years  Our qualitative research suggests a second buying cycle when the child is 1-2 years old. This second cycle is mainly due to the child outgrowing items, so parents need to re-purchase larger items (e.g. bigger car seat, larger clothes, etc).  There were also various mentions of purchases around the first birthday, which is a milestone, and often involves a party with friends and family buying gifts as well as the parents.  Aside from simply buying larger items, as the child develops, items needed/desired also change over time - e.g. buying of tricycles, larger toys, etc.  This second buying cycle also appears to be a suitable time for parents to replace older/well used items such as bibs, sheets, toiletries, etc.
  11. 11. 10 Section 3 – The Research & Buying Process As one would expect, the fact that the products will be used by the babies implies ultimate care is taken to purchase the right, safe and cost effective product. As such, the purchase process is complex and involves multiple sources of information, and parents are doing a lot of research before buying. Implications: A site that is streamlined, facilitates the buying process and provides access to information including product reviews, peer discussions, and technical information on the products will be key motivators. Detailed analysis:  The research/buying process is quite complex, and includes multiple touch- points: consulting friends, comparison shopping, checking several reference resources and getting validation from trusted experts or word-of-mouth sources (source #35). Other touch-points include websites, ads, apps and social networking.  Lots of research is happening before parents buy a baby product - more so than for other household products. One study states toys and baby food are the most highly researched products by parents (source #36). One popular site for this is Babycenter.com, which includes forums and a product recall locator. Other sites that provide lots of content in way of research materials for parents include Babies"R"Us, Hasbro and Leap Frog.  Online customer reviews are a critical source of research for buyers. It will be important for Marilynjean.com to provide this type of comprehensive customer product reviews, much like those found on Amazon or Babies"R"Us websites.  Word-of-mouth reviews are also important, so creating buzz around the US launch will be important.
  12. 12. 11 Section 4 - The Economic Opportunity A lot of money is spent in a relatively short period to prepare for a new baby ($7K-$14K in the first year), particularly for first-time parents, who are more likely to over-spend. Implications: Value/Price and Quality are key, particularly for the big spender first time mom. Detailed analysis:  The market is large: it is estimated that $36.3 billion is spent annually by North Americans on baby products (source #15), though another source puts this figure closer to $7 billion (source #24) (variations in these figures are most likely a function of different categories being included in the calculation). Either way, the market is sizable and expanding, with companies creating new lines around areas such as organic/natural, germ protection and baby skin care, to name a few.  The birth of a baby prompts a lot of spending on behalf of the new parents in a relatively short period of time as they prepare for and gather what they need. In fact, one recent study states 94% of mothers spend more money on their child's clothes than on their own (source #20). Generally speaking, parents want to be good parents and provide whatever their baby needs.  In the first year, it is estimated US parents will spend $7K-$14K on their baby. Though it should be noted, some of these estimates factor in costs such as medical care. This cost remains similar for the first few years of the child's life.  Within reason, perceived quality trumps price for many parents, and once brand loyalty has been developed, parents are unlikely to switch brands, even for cheaper options (source #32).  Repeat parents typically spend less than the first time around, as they can re- use old products, and they also have a better idea of what they truly need.  “First-time parents... believe that the more they buy, the easier it will be.” (source #16). Parents spend more on their first baby and are less willing to accept hand-me-downs for this first child (source #19). This drives home the importance of capturing new parents. ("82% of parents admitted they bought a lot of stuff for baby that they didn’t need" (source #19)).  Interestingly, Dr. Trachtenberg, a US pediatrician, noted with her patients, "The more stressed a new parent is about a particular aspect of their baby’s life... the more likely he or she is to spend on it." (source #16)
  13. 13. 12 Section 5 – What & How Parents are Buying Big ticket items are key (strollers and car seats for example) and parents clearly get many items through their gift registry or money from friends and relatives – but parents are ultimately the ones that select the product. That said, do not ignore smaller items such as teething toys, sound toys, changing pads, eating aids. Implications: Product selection, broad offering and ability to allow parents to specify a wish list or set up a registry are key. However, the main target is the parent/mom and not the gift giver given the parents are typically the ones that specify the product to be bought. Detailed analysis:  In terms of where the money is going relative to product purchases, budgeting website investopedia.com provides general outlines for cost for the first year as follows: stroller ($400+), toys ($200+), furnishings ($1100+), nursing/feeding hard goods ($400+), formula/food ($1260+), clothes ($720+), diapers ($468+).  The most popular items on registries include car seats, strollers, baby feeding products, diapers, health and grooming care (source #25). This is likely a factor of these items being necessities for new parents.  For bigger ticket registry items, friends and family sometimes pool their money to help purchase these more expensive items (e.g. stroller, car seat).  Popular registry stores include Babies"R"Us (features a special customer service desk just for registries), buy buy Baby (has in-store registry kiosks and a large toy selection), and Target (offers a broader line of merchandise that may not be offered by the baby specialty stores). All 3 stores offer 'in- store' building of registries, where the expecting parent(s) can browse and scan items they want to add to their registry with a small handheld device.  Amazon.com also offers a baby registry, and there are online guides to aid in this process, including one that utilizes a popular baby product guide, 'Baby Bargains'.  Family, especially the child's grandparents/great grandparents often contribute a sizable sum towards baby products. Web comments regarding these gifts report sums ranging from $100 - $7,000 (source #27). From reader comments, it appears more likely that these gifts are monetary in nature - in other words, the gift givers are not necessarily buying the products themselves, but rather giving the new/expecting parents money to help buy what they need, or buying specifically what the parent is asking for. As such, it likely does not make sense to specifically target these buyers.  According to Amazon.com, the following are the top ten best sellers in Baby. The majority of these products have been consistent best sellers for Amazon for at least 2 years. More detailed tables presenting Amazon's top 5 baby products by category can be found in Appendix III.  According to recent market stats, the key brands in the baby products market include Johnson & Johnson, Gerber Products, Wakodo, Morinaga Milk, Nestle, #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 Vulli Sophie the Giraffe Teether Baby Einstein Take Along Tunes Summer Infant Contoured Changing Pad Freshfoods Mash & Serve Bowl Thermos Foogo Leak Proof Stainless Steel Food Jar, Blue, 10 Ounce Nosefrida The Snotsucker Nasal Aspirator Carter's Keep Me Dry Waterproof Fitted Quilted Crib Pad, White Cloud b Twilight Constellation Night Light, Turtle Lamaze Play & Grow Freddie the Firefly Take Along Toy Replacement Tubing for Medela Pump in Style and New Pump in Style Advanced Breast Pump
  14. 14. 13 Procter & Gamble, California Baby, Synutra, Mead Johnson Nutrition, Kao, Babies"R"Us, Pampers, Beech-Nut Nutrition, UniCharm, SMA Nutrition, Hain- Celestial, SCA Hygiene Products, Danone, Hero, Abbott Nutrition, The Parent Company, Seventh Generation, Fisher-Price, Organix Brands, Kimberly-Clark, Earth's Best, HJ Heinz, and International Inc. (source #24) Section 6 – The Key Product & Brand Choice Drivers Parents are seeking high quality, functional, stylish, safe products that can make a statement. They look for brands they trust, can connect with emotionally and perceive to deliver on the key drivers of quality, style and functionality. Implications: A carefully curated selection of products will be key. Detailed analysis:  Sales of safety related products (e.g. baby monitors, stair gates, etc) have reportedly benefitted from relatively recent changes in social perceptions and government legislation regarding these products.  Current trends suggest buyers are currently looking for functional/ergonomic designs, stylish choices, items that make a statement, all with a focus on safety (source #30). Products that can offer a combination of these things are likely to do well.  Some parents want their baby product purchases to make a statement (e.g. highest safety rating, modern design, organic, etc), and are willing to pay a premium for this.  Emotional reward appears to be a driver, with half of parents saying, “I don’t just buy brands for functional reasons, I also get an emotional reward out of it” (source #36). This passion/emotional aspect supports the idea that brand purchase decisions are made carefully, and that brand trust is critical.  Interestingly, some new parents are utilizing baby planners to help them decide which products to buy and where to buy them. It does not appear this is a large market today, but may be worth monitoring in the coming years.  Co-branded products are trending, including branding efforts with celebrities and characters from children's TV shows.  Green baby products appears to be a trend, though it is not yet clear if being green is equally important as other factors like style, functionality and trust.
  15. 15. 14 Section 7 – What About Online Shopping? Key advantages of online shopping for baby products include tandem research and buying, customer reviews, and ease of shopping – the latter a key driver for the busy parent. Given the importance of time and ease of shopping, it is not surprising to see the advantages for in-store including service, ease of returns, instant gratification and try before you buy. Implications: Enhancing the online shopping experience with reviews, articles and how-to info will be important to help out new moms and draw them to the site. Also making online returns easy, quick and cheap shipping options, and accurate sizing guides will be important. Detailed analysis: Online Advantage  While not specific to baby products, 22% of women shop online at least once per day (source #26), so women are already online, shopping. As such, it is not a stretch for them to buy baby products online.  Allows for research and shopping to be done in tandem. One respondent from our qualitative study stated, "When i go to a store there's so many options and I have no idea which product is good. I like the fact that I can see reviews on amazon and see what other parents think."  Parents can save time and energy and shop at home, on their own schedule.  Until very recently, there were some sales tax advantages to shopping online, depending on state of residence (e.g. CA residences did not have to pay tax from Amazon.com). Retail Advantage  On the other hand, some shoppers like to be able to see and feel the product in person, which is an obvious advantage of the retail stores.  Convenience when something is needed today and/or instant gratification.  Returning is easier in-store vs online.  For sized items (e.g. clothing), you can try on in-store before buying.  Trained staff on-hand to help answer questions/locate products, etc.  Don't have to pay for shipping. Which Online Stores Top rated online stores (Amazon, BabyAge, Babies"R"Us) excel in price, website ease-of-use, free/cheap shipping options, speed of shipping and offering a broad selection. Implications: There are many big players in the online baby shopping market, finding a way to offer must-have products while differentiating will be key.
  16. 16. 15 Detailed analysis:  Independent website toptenreviews.com rated the top online baby stores for 2012. They looked at multiple facets, including product selection, website, customer service, shipping policies, etc. Here is the ranking (source #14).  Amazon was rated highest across the board, and has a reputation for being cheap, fast, good website, offering free shipping and carrying everything.  BabyAge faired quite well, though was weaker than Amazon on selection, shipping and customer service.  Babies"R"Us was also ranked highly, though the website and shipping were not strong points. Which Retail Stores Babies"R"Us is the leading retailer in this category, but there are many players. Many of these stores have both retail locations and online stores - offering the advantages of both. Implications: Talking up the key advantages of online shopping vs in- store will be key, as these traditional retailers will all be competing with Marilynjean.com for many of the same customers. Detailed analysis:  "Babies”R”Us is the nation’s leading retailer specializing in baby products" (source #15). They operate both brick-and-mortar stores and a website and are known for value/coupons, carrying popular brands, and a strong loyalty program. Their online branch also provides before-birth resources where expecting parents can do research on what they need to buy, and even how to use products (e.g. how to install a car seat). This creates a one-stop-shop for baby needs that parents can do either in a retail store or online.  buy buy Baby, owned by Bed, Bath & Beyond, projects more of an upscale image vs the more value oriented Babies"R"Us. They are known for strong customer service and uniquely laid out stores. They operate a website as well.  Some data suggested that traditional grocery stores are tapping int o the opportunity and carrying a wider selection of baby products. However, high priced items may not work in this setting (source #30).  Other stores mentioned in our qualitative study include: Costco ("great and cheap wipes"), Ikea ("bibs, bowls"), Target ("cute cheap clothes, organic food, toys"), Gap, Old navy, Gymboree and Walmart ("prices, selection"). #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Amazon BabyAge Babies"R"Us BabyEarth buybuy BABY Diapers.com One Step Ahead Target Great Baby Products Land of Nod Walmart
  17. 17. 16 APPENDIX I - Sources 1. PMB (Print Measurement Bureau) 2012 Fall profile and media data for Canadian mothers of children under 3 and children 3 – 5. 2. MRI (Mediamark Research Inc) 2012 profile and media data for US mothers of children under 4 and under 3. 3. Pewresearch.org - The New Demography of American Motherhood - Aug, 2010 4. Statisticbrain.com - New Mother Statistics - Research Date: Sep, 2012 5. Cbsnews.com - Study: Age of First-Time Moms Is Going Up - Aug, 2009 6. Babycenter.com - Surprising facts about birth in the US - Aug, 2011 7. Cdc.gov - Age-specific birth rates 8. Cdc.gov - Mean age of mother, 1970–2000 9. Census.gov 10. Guardian.co.uk - Baby race: the US under-1 population mapped - May, 2012 11. Csmonitor.com - More than half of US babies now minorities, US Census reports - May, 2012 12. USAToday.com - Minority Births Reach Historic High - May, 2012 13. Nytimes.com - How Companies Learn Your Secrets - Feb, 2012 14. Baby-stores-review.toptenreviews.com - 2012 Best Online Baby Store Reviews & Comparisons 15. Cloverleafinnovation.com - Retail Reinvention: The Magic of Babies - May, 2012 16. Parenting.blogs.nytimes.com - Why First-Time Parents Overspend on Baby - May, 2012 17. Fayobserver.com - More parents buying "green" baby products, diapers - Apr, 2011 18. Budgeting.thenest.com - How Much Money Is Spent on a Baby in a Year? 19. ivillage.com - How Much Money Do Parents Spend During Baby's First Year? - Sep, 2010 20. Xojane.com - I Spend More Money On Myself Than My Kid - Aug, 2012 21. Investopedia.com - Budgeting For A New Baby - Aug, 2009 22. Amazon.com - Amazon's top baby products 23. Amazon.com - Create a Baby Registry using Baby Bargains as a Guide 24. Reportlinker.com - Baby Products Industry: Market Research Reports, Statistics and Analysis 25. ehow.com - Most Popular Baby Registry Items; The Best Place to Do a Baby Registry 26. She-conomy.com - Marketing To Women Quick Facts 27. Babyandbump.momtastic.com - Spending on baby products before baby is born 28. Parenting.com - The Cost of Raising a Baby 29. Babycenter.com - When and where U.S. babies are born 30. Commons.emich.edu - Current Market Trends - Baby Product Industry - Apr, 2009 31. Marketintelligences.com - Trends in the Baby Products Industry - Jul, 2010 32. Nbcwashington.com - Parents Willing to Pay More for Baby Products - Apr, 2011 33. Msnbc.msn.com - Busy and baffled, new moms hire baby planners - Dec, 2009 34. Voices.yahoo.com - How to Research Baby Products - Aug, 2009 35. Swdsi.org - Online Reviews of Baby Products – A Community of Moms - 2010 36. Madeformums.com - Parents research baby toys more than any other purchase - Sep, 2012 37. Contently.com - How 3 Kids Brands Use Content to Woo Parents - Sep, 2012 38. Babble.com - Top 50 Mom Blogs - 2010 39. Topmommyblogs.com - Content analysis of mom/baby-centric blogs 40. Youtube.com - Content analysis of baby product advertisements 41. World of Moms – Boston University School of Management Paper Series No. 2012-19
  18. 18. 17 APPENDIX II – Verbatim from Qualitative Email Survey Q. Which stage of maternity or early parenthood involved most purchases and key transition periods that involved new purchases. Newborn was when the most products were bought. Then, again at 1 month as we realized we needed things we didn't have. Then, again for the next 6 months. After 6 months, it became the norm to buy regular items like diapers, etc. Then, at about 1 year I found the need to get new things for both babies. Again, at 2 years. When my first was 2, she was potty trained, so diapers ended and formula was done, so I didn't need to go to baby stores, etc for her. I tend to go to the grocery store for diapers for my second and she is off formula and all baby foods, etc so I don't get anything but diapers and soaps, etc for her. Between 6 and 7 months of pregnancy with baby #1 - so much gear needed. Then around a 2 years old you need new bigger carseats and tricycles and helmets and stuff like that. Then, when baby number 2 comes you need some replacement/incremental stuff around the 7th month of pregnancy - new strollers a new video monitor second set of sound machines and diaper jeanies. Last 3 months of pregnancy and the first 6 months after birth. At 1 year birthday. PRE - BABY 5 months - find out sex and start buying a few cute items... getting excited about baby! good time to purchase higher priced clothes, because the reality of baby expenses hasn't set in yet 5 - 8 months - maternity clothes 6 - 8 months - designing the nursery. this, of course, hasn't pertained to us since we don't have a nursery space. however, most of my buds who do were spending money on things like cribs, changing tables & decor during this time frame. 7/8 months - receive lots of shower gifts - most of the big ticket items (car seat, stroller, Ergo baby carrier received from family). Lots of nice more expensive baby clothes (see Kate Quinn mentioned below) 9 months - all those must have items you just realized you should have: receiving blankets, swaddle blankets, nipple cream & pads, baby wash, creams & lotions, diapers, diaper bag, little items like rattles. POST - BABY 3 months - baby starts to outgrow her clothes. time to buy 3 - 6 month clothes and weather specific items (for me: had a little spending frenzy of summer suits right before we went back east; now: long pants, long sleeved onesies & sweaters) I started buying baby furniture probably 3-4 months before the due date. Maybe around 14 - 16 months when he grew out of his first car seat and starting walking around more I buy more batches. Third trimester was when I both registered for and finished shopping my baby list. I basically got everything I needed for the first year almost during that time. I'm just not prepping for solid foods when he turns 6 months and getting feeding related products. Third trimester when you know that it's most likely to happen and when u possibly know the sex of the baby, buy most of the newborn to 12 months stuff. once they go to daycare at around 1, you buy again so that u can prep them for childcare. Pregnancy: 7-9months, baby: 4-9 months. 6mo I had a lot of new baby related products - starting solids, becoming more interactive with toys During pregnancy. Around 1 years old started buying more food related items and replenish old items (bibs, toiletries, etc). Second - third trimester, i bought the most..... just before bb arrived and right after, i rec'd lots of baby stuff... and i've a huge lot of 3-6mos baby clothes Closer to third trimester of maternity bought most of my baby related products. At 6 months,1 year old and 2yrs found myself with a new batch of baby related products.
  19. 19. 18 Around 2nd and 3rd trimester. Around 12-18 months We did a big round of purchases late in my pregnancy...largely prepping for when Dani would be growing from 0 to 1 yr old. As a new mom, you get a lot of clothing given to you, so you find that you simply have to supplement what you need for the first year or so. Once the baby is a bit older (over 1 to 1.5 yrs), you find that you've gone through much of the baby s hower gifts and you need to start buying again. Most of this I'm thinking in terms of clothing. Other baby-related products were largely all purchased late in my pregnancy. 2 years old - the kid starts demanding for things! 6 months into pregnancy. Most purchases were made during pregnancy between 5-6 months. Baby is 2 months old, have not made any new baby-related products yet Right before baby arrived, new parents buy lots because consumerism makes you think you need everything.... but you don't. 2 years old i.e. balance bike, umbrella stroller, cute outfits, toddler bed, potty, food We bought a lot of our baby items 3-4 months just before our son was born. Items we purchased were primarily "one time" purchases such as a crib/stroller/car seat etc., which cost the most in terms of dollar amount per transaction. However, because my son is formula fed, we continued to buy a lot of baby related products on an on going basis as well. (Bottles, formula, nipples etc). We generally purchase our baby stuff on a "as needed" basis so we haven't really noticed a larger than usual batch of baby products. Q. Where buy child’s products and why. babies r us due to constant coupons. 20% off baby seats, strollers, etc are HUGE. Wipes from Costco - the BEST wipes and even at a better price - how great is that. We even go in just for that sometimes. Diapers - Vons or online at diapers.com. - soap too. Clothes, target as they have Great prices on some really really cute clothes. Or, clothes at gymboree with coupons. Ikea - bibs, bowls, flatware Target - has the best price on Natural Organic baby products like Burt's Bees and California baby Babies R Us - Occasionally, I will trek to babies are us for something special that I need to see for myself or think I may need to return like a babyproofing device. I typically only go there if I am buying a gift off the baby registry or if I have one of their 20% off coupons BabiesRUS because they have the best price on Pampers diapers and wipes. Target for clothes and toys. Have bought a few things like car seats and monitors on Amazon. Amazon.com for basics (easy & fast and they have everything), registered at land of nod & giggle (organic options, cute options, combo of clothes, toys & basics/necessities - also, guides to what you need), chloes closet consignment store - cheap and awesome used baby clothes, Rainbow Coop - environmentally friendly baby products. I mostly get everything off of amazon. When i go to a store there's so many options and I have no idea which product is good. I like the fact that I can see reviews on amazon and see what other parents think. Also I love the fact that I don't have to go out and get stuff. It just gets delivered to my door. Saves tons of time and energy especially with a little one. And Amazon's return policy on baby stuff is pretty easy and convenient.
I do get my baby wipes from Costco cuz they seem to be the cheapest and of good quality. Almost all my baby purchases are through Amazon and Diapers.com. No taxes (at least used to be) and free prime shipping (since I bought a membership at Amazon) + shopping any time of day at my convenience without having to leave the house + I'm online doing research anyway and I read most of the reviews before purchasing.
  20. 20. 19 For clothes - gap, old navy and gymboree because of the selection and constant sales. for baby needs, walmart, superstore and babies r us because of the abundant selection and sales. Toys R Us - large selection, Walmart-price, Superstore-conveience, Zellers, TJ's, amazon.com, babysteals.com During pregnancy - bought many items online and were gifted many items. Post-pregnancy - where ever convenient (ie Babies R Us, London Drugs, etc.) Lots of presents... i bought most of mine online Superstore for diapers, baby formula, baby snacks, clothing. It is a convenient one-stop shop. Costco for diapers and pull-ups. Costco is lower priced. Also shop at Zellers for the value. TJ's and Westcoast kids for specialty items. Babies R Us - good place to pick up something in a rush. TJ the Kiddies Store - stocks a lot of items and staff are knowledgeable. Wal-Mart is always good because it's cheap. We got a few things from babies R us (mostly because we had to...not by choice, they tend to be expensive). Ikea is also good because it's cheap. (You'll sense a theme here...you have to be price conscious because you need to purchase so much stuff in the first few years!) Clothing - again the large discount stores like Zellers, Wal-Mart, and even Winners had a bit of stuff. Toys r us - it's convenient for us Walmart - convenience, Babies r us - convenience, In the states - cheap pricing Baby's R Us, Superstore, Costco, Walmart, Children's Place, Carters (US) - depends on where there are sales and gives us the best value toys r us (when on sale), walmart, tulalip outlet, target, superstore, westcoast kids. We've purchased from speciality baby stores such as Baby's World, Babies R Us and TJ Kiddies. Because these stores cater specifically to babies and young children, the items that they carry is much more comprehensive than Superstore for instance. However, for items such as formula, food and diapers we frequent Superstore a lot because we can purchase the majority of our household items there too. So in short, price and convenience is what drive s us to certain stores. To date, we have rarely purchased online. No particular reason, except maybe because we are impatient and can't wait for the delivery! Q. Whether consider buying child’s products online and why/why not. yes, do and will continue. Great way to compare. Clothes not as good as I might review online, but need to touch and feel the product to buy. I consider online first. We are both busy working parents. The free time I have is after 8PM at night, I don't want to be out driving around if I can take 5 minutes to order stuff online and scratch it off my to do list. My only hesitation is the environmental impact of ordering stuff, which is why I try to bundle as much as I can together in one shipment. Prefer the stores as I like to see and feel before buying. Plus it is a hassle to return things boughtonline. Yes - nice to be able to shop online & not leave the house. Good to get updates on sales & take advantage of free shipping. Heck yes. Already do. Aside from clothes, hard to buy online. can't be bothered with the hassle of returning if things don't work out or fit. even when i buy online, it's from the stores that I usually buy from cuz then i know the sizing..
  21. 21. 20 Yes, ease of buying from home, price I did cross-border online shopping only when I wanted to buy many products at a time which was during my pregnancy. After the pregnancy I bought significantly less online and would buy one off items in Vancouver either in baby specialty shops or drug stores. Of course! time saver and also it's easy to compare prices and find deals. Yes, can find deals. Yes, I would as long as I am able to find adequate reviews on the product or go to a physical retail location to view/test the product before buying. Yes, but it really isn't something that we often think about...we're still in the habit of traveling to a store to buy things. I'm sure there are good deals online, but sometimes it's just convenient to go to a store because you can pick up other things you need at the same time. only big ticket items, otherwise the savings online is not worth the hassle Yes, if the we can get a better price for the same product and shipping cost is fair. Yes - only typical items, diaper, cream, other products that I can test before purchase yes especially if a better price and free delivery after $20s. As mentioned above, we haven't purchased too many baby items online. However, if the online price is significantly less and we don't need the item urgently then we will buy online. Sometimes once the cost of delivery is added it is no longer worth waiting for it to come in the mail. Q. Great brands for kids at different ages. Diapers- pampers ONLY - and as long as possible - Swaddlers or else we have issues with diaper rash
Wipes - Costco Kirkland Brand - again due to diaper rash issues- they are both sensitive without being called that, moist, and inexpensive
Diaper cream - Balmex
Bottles - Dr. Browns
All breast pump and feeding accessories - Medela
Soap and Lotion - Aveeno baby - still at age 3 too. 
Safety items - safety 1st

Infant car seat stroller system - Chicco
Car seat after 1 - 
Clothes - target's circo brand, gymboree, Carter's Carseats - Britax and Graco (choice purely depends on safety ratings) (Ages Birth to 100 lbs) Stroller - I love my Bob and we have a really nice Maclaren double stroller (I have had many, these are the best birth to age 5) Chicco - High chair and Pack N Play (7 months to age 3) Melissa and Doug - Toys Age 1 to Age 4 Baby Carrier - Again, I have had many, the ErgoBaby rocks! (6 weeks to 2 years) Summer Infant Video Monitor - I actually think the quality and reliability of these is terrible, we have already had two break in 5 years and they are $300, but there really isn't a good alternative and for me the video monitor helps me train great little sleepers (birth to age 5) Pampers for diapers and wipes - 0 to 24 months Earth's Best for jar foods and cereal - 0 to 12 months Burt's Bees shampoo and wash Aveeno Baby lotion This is a hard one - so far I haven't developed too many favorite brands. I like Kate Quinn for organic baby clothes (pre-baby I registered for lots of this stuff. Haven't bought any since then because it's expensive. Post baby you realize that spending $5 on a used onesie is nicer than $30 on a new one.) I like California Baby bath products because they smell nice and are eco - friendly. I like Tea Collection clothes - SF based and I can find them at the consignment shop!
  22. 22. 21 We liked earth's best for formula and cereal. (until the age of 1)
we love melissa and doug toys (from 1 - now)
Baby einstein also has great toys (from 6 months - 1.5). Another good one is leapfrog. Their toys seem fun, but educational at the same time. Tea Collection clothes and blankets! =) Aden + Anais swaddle blankets for first 3 months, Bjorn Babysitter Bouncer for first year I'd imagine, Ergo Baby Carrier also for the first year. I like babygap for clothes cuz when on sale, decently priced and wears/washes well...good for crawling and when baby is more active. for connor, i found that pampers diapers fit him better than huggies (leak wise) Kushies: change pad covers, bibs. Babylicious: receiving blankets. Piccolo Bambino: receiving blankets. Carter's: baby clothes. Ergo baby carrier. Fisher-Price toys. Stride Rite shoes for toddlers. Robeez shoes for babies. Parade, Perlimpinpin, melissa&doug, fisher price, baby einstein Considering my baby is only 7mos, i like anything that ease me from taking care of my baby on a day-to-day basis... items like stroller, carseat, bouncy chairs, high chairs, walker, playmats...etc. i don't have specific brand that i like the most Thermos products (for 3 months and up). Fisher price toys, booster seat for birth and up. Robeez shoes for babies. Kushi for baby change pads, crib sheets. I generally don't look at specific brands. It would depend purely on what I am purchasing. From there, I'd look at what brands are available and usually will choose the most reputable brand based on reviews or just what I hear about the brand (i.e. I tend to go with brands I grew up with such as Fisher Price, etc). So far we haven't been particularly brand conscious in terms of product choice for Dani. The First Years produces great products, but I don't think that we actually have bought any things for her from them yet. Most of the toys have been hand-me-downs or stuffed animals that don't carry a particular brand name with them. I'm sure in the future we'll have stuff from The First Years...they always seem to be designed well and help develop the kid's cognition. Lego and Mega Blocks are always great options because it helps the kids express their creativity, learn and refine their motor skills, and are relatively easy for the parents to clean up. :) Plus they have a wide range of options for different age groups. We are a big fan of playmobil Pampers, huggies, Carter, Tommie tippie, Playtex, Nuk, Fisher price Baby is only 2 months, we have not switched brands on current products. We are currently using Pampers diapers, Kirkland wipes, Fisher Price Toys/mobiles, clothing/blankets etc from various stores - Carters, Joe Fresh. We use products that are good values, good quality and safe for our baby. We will likely continue using those same brands. Fisher price, aveeno, safety first, and organic items, pampers, karen katz books, enfamil, evenflo glass bottles, avent pacifiers 0-5 months. mexx, carter, bumbo chair, gerber/heinz foods, sage humidifier, 6 months. Maclaren stroller, safety first car seat 1. 5 years. Joe's, Target (circo), huggies, kirkland, safety first bed rail years old. puma, new balance shoes, leap frog leap pad, 3 years. osh gosh, gymboree, children's place 4 years old. Diapers - been using Huggies for the majority of the time. Formula - Enfamil A+ from 0-12 months, now Enfagro. Food - we generally try to buy organic when available, but not any particular brand. Baby bottles - Dr. Browns. clothes - Carters (good value, decent quality, decent style).
  23. 23. 22 APPENDIX III – Amazon.com Baby Products - Top 5 Sellers by Category (Oct 5, 2012) Bathing/Skin care #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Pampers Sensitive Wipes 64 Count (Pack of 12) Pampers Softcare Baby Fresh Wipes 12x Box With Tub 864 Count Pampers Softcare Unscented Wipes 12x Box With Tub 864 Count Nosefrida The Snotsucker Nasal Aspirator Lansinoh HPA Lanolin for Breastfeeding Mothers, 40 Grams Bedding #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Carter's Keep Me Dry Waterproof Fitted Quilted Crib Pad, White American Baby Company Organic Interlock Pack N Play Sheet American Baby Company 100% Cotton Value Jersey Knit Fitted Portable/Mini Crib Sheet, Celery BreathableBaby Breathable Mesh Crib Liner, White aden + anais 4 Pack Muslin Swaddle Wrap, Jungle Jam Car seats #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Graco Nautilus 3-in-1 Car Seat, Matrix Britax 2 Pack EZ- Cling Sun Shades, Black Kiddopotamus Snuzzler Complete Head and Body Support, Ivory Terry Brica Baby In- Sight Mirror, Gray Munchkin Backseat Organizer, Black Diapering #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Playtex Diaper Genie Refill (810 count total - 3 pack of 270 each) Pampers Baby Dry Diapers Economy Pack Plus Size 4 192 Count Seventh Generation Free & Clear Baby Wipes, 350 count Pampers Swaddlers Diapers Economy Pack Plus Size 3, 174 Count Pampers Baby Dry Diapers Economy Pack Plus Size 5 172 Count Feeding #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Lansinoh 20435 Breastmilk Storage Bags, 25-Count Boxes (Pack of 3) Lansinoh 20265 Disposable Nursing Pads, 60-Count Boxes (Pack of 4) Earth's Best Organic Infant Formula with Iron, DHA & ARA, 23.2 Ounce Canisters (Pack of 4) Freshfoods Mash & Serve Bowl Replacement Tubing for Medela Pump in Style and New Pump in Style Advanced Breast Pump For Moms #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Wondfo Pregnancy Test Strips, 25-count 50 Ovulation Prediction Strips & 20 Pregnancy Test Strips Combo pack 40 (LH) Ovulation tests and 10 (HCG) Pregnancy tests Leachco Snoogle Total Body Pillow Nexcare 524560 Basal Digital Thermometer
  24. 24. 23 Furniture #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Carter's Keep Me Dry Waterproof Fitted Quilted Crib Pad, White Safety 1st Heavenly Dreams White Crib Mattress Prince Lionheart Jumbo Toy Hammock Graco Pack 'N Play On the Go Travel Playard, Go Green Dream On Me 3" Playard Mattress, White Gear #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Vtech - Sit-to- Stand Learning Walker Fisher-Price Rainforest Jumperoo Fisher-Price Rainforest Melodies and Lights Deluxe Gym Fisher-Price Cradle 'N Swing, My Little Snugabunny ERGObaby Heart2Heart Infant Insert, Natural Gifts #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Vulli Sophie the Giraffe Teether Manhattan Toy Winkel Philips AVENT BPA Free Classic Infant Starter Gift Set Munchkin Twisty Figure 8 Teether Sassy Ring O' Links Rattle Developmental Toy Health & Baby Care #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Vulli Sophie the Giraffe Teether Crane Ee- 5301W Drop Shape Cool Mist Humidifier, White Vicks Warm Mist Humidifier with Auto Shut- Off Crane 2.3 Gallon COOL Mist humidifier, White and Blue Nosefrida Baby Nasal Aspirator with 4 filters and 20 Additional Filters Nursery Décor #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Munchkin Nursery Projector and Sound System, White Cloud B Twilight Pink Ladybug - Night Light RoomMates Disney Princess Peel & Stick Wall Decals with Gems Cloud b Twilight Constellation Night Light, Sea Turtle Cloud b Sleep Sheep Four Soothing Sounds From Nature
  25. 25. 24 Potty Training #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Pampers Easy Ups Trainers, Value Pack, Girl, Size 4 S2T/3T, 100 Count Pampers Easy Ups Boy Trainers Value Pack Size 5 S3t/4t 90 Count Pampers Easy Ups Girl Trainers Value Pack Size 5 S3t/4t 90 Count Pampers Easy Ups Boy Trainers Value Pack Size 4 S2t/3t 100 Count Pull-Ups Learning Design Training Pants, Size 3T-4T, Boy, 50 Count (Pack of 2) Safety #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Infant Optics DXR-5 2.4 GHz Digital Video Baby Monitor with Night Vision Regalo Easy Step Walk Thru Gate, White Mommy's Helper Outlet Plugs 36 Pack Motorola MBP36 Remote Wireless Video Baby Monitor with Infrared Night Vision and Zoom, 3.5 Inch Regalo Easy Open Super Wide Walk Thru Gate - White Strollers #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Munchkin Backseat Organizer, Black Britax Stroller Organizer, Black Baby Buddy Secure-A-Toy, Orange/Gold Bob Handlebar Console for Single Strollers, Black Hook 'n' Stroll Stroller Accessory, Black

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