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Collaboration Tools and Patterns for Creative Thinking

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Many creativity methods follow similar structures and principles. Design Patterns capture such invariants of proven good practices and discuss why, when and how creative thinking methods match various situations of collaboration. Moreover patterns connect different forms with each other. Once we understand the underlying structures of creative thinking processes we can facilitate digital tools to support them. While such tools can foster the effective application of established methods and even change their properties, tools can also enable new patterns of collaboration.

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Collaboration Tools and Patterns for Creative Thinking

  1. 1. Collaboration tools and patterns for creative thinking Christian Kohls Cologone University of Applied Sciences Computer Science, Socio-technical systems
  2. 2. Patterns From methods to patterns Connecting patterns to languages Tools Classic Tools Digital Tools Social Tools Patterns Emerging patterns enabled by tools Overview
  3. 3. Credits
  4. 4. Use a deck of cards with random inspirations Random Impulse Give your thoughts a new and unbiased direction by using random stimuli such as random words, images, or impressions from a walk.
  5. 5. Multiple Perspectives Look at your problems and solutions with different eyes. . Focus on one perspective at a time and find as many details, insights and implications for that view.
  6. 6. Why From methods to patterns
  7. 7. Why From methods to patterns
  8. 8. Why From methods to patterns
  9. 9. Why From methods to patterns
  10. 10. Why From methods to patterns
  11. 11. Why From methods to patterns Details Consequences
  12. 12. From methods to patterns “Use this solution a million times over, without ever doing it the same way twice.“
  13. 13. Think of 3 new perspectives. Example: With the eyes of… • Superman • An elephant • A soccer trainer
  14. 14. What / Solution When / Context Why / Problem and Forces Why / Solution Details, Consequences Connection to other patterns
  15. 15. Brainstorming 1. Define a topic or goal 2. Write down everything that comes into your mind 3. Allow all contributions, and suspend judgment 4. After a specified time or a targeted number of ideas has been found, start to cluster or evaluate the ideas Connecting patterns to languages Imagine you are superman Find connections to a random word What if… you could travel from Tokyo to Cologne in 5 min Blending: Combinations of patterns lead to new patterns
  16. 16. Brainstorming 1. Define a topic or goal 2. Write down everything that comes into your mind 3. Allow all contributions, and suspend judgment 4. After a specified time or a targeted number of ideas has been found, start to cluster or evaluate the ideas Connecting patterns to languages Group BrainstormABC Brainstorm Flashlight Refining: Specialization of patterns
  17. 17. Brainstorming 1. Define a topic or goal 2. Write down everything that comes into your mind 3. Allow all contributions, and suspend judgment 4. After a specified time or a targeted number of ideas has been found, start to cluster or evaluate the ideas Connecting patterns to languages Suspend Judgement Idea Quota Composing: Patterns are built by patterns
  18. 18. Brainstorming 1. Define a topic or goal 2. Write down everything that comes into your mind 3. Allow all contributions, and suspend judgment 4. After a specified time or a targeted number of ideas has been found, start to cluster or evaluate the ideas Connecting patterns to languages Evaluate your ideas Connecting: Patterns can point to contextual patterns
  19. 19. Innovation Process Connecting patterns to languages Understanding Ideation Judgement Implementation Combine Adapt 5W1H SWOT Cluster Vote Prototype Deadlines Brainstorming ABC Flashlight Mindmap Whiteboard Sticky Notes Idea Journal Connect to Tools:
  20. 20. Classic tools
  21. 21. Digital Sticky Notes • Unlimited space • Take everywhere • Save states • Use of templates
  22. 22. The Power of Templates
  23. 23. Thought triggers • Always at hand • Method description • Integrated journals • Random draws
  24. 24. Random impulses
  25. 25. Interactive whiteboards
  26. 26. Interactive whiteboards
  27. 27. Interactive whiteboards • Prepare sessions • Integrate rich media • Integrate thought triggers • Restructure content • Save results
  28. 28. From digital to social tools Shared workspace connect collaborators mindmeister linoit mural.ly
  29. 29. Extreme Collaboration
  30. 30. Extreme Collaboration • Ad-hoc sessions without registration • „No idea left behind“ • High order of parallelism
  31. 31. Outlook • Measuring the performance increase: • More ideas? Better ideas? • Integration of methods • Add random content • Add thought triggers • Randomizing contributions • Sending huge number of contributions • Visualization • Filters
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