Coping With Stress

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This presentation describes how stress affects us and ways to cope with stress.

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  • HONORED TO BE HERE TODAY. I HAVE ENORMOUS RESPECT FOR CHILD CARE PROVIDERS. BOTH OF MY CHILDREN WHO ARE NOW 14 AND 17 WERE IN CHILD CARE, PART OF THE TIME\n\n THROUGH KIDS UNLIMITED AND THE JCC. MY KIDS WERE IN DAY CARE PART OR FULL-TIME SINCE THEY WERE ABOUT THREE MONTHS OLD, SO I KNOW HOW HARD CHILD CARE \n\nWORKERS JOBS ARE. I ALSO KNOW THAT MOST CHILDCARE WORKERS ARE VERY DEDICATED AND LOVE WORKING WITH CHILDREN, CHOOSING THIS JOB OVER OTHERS THAT MAY PAY \n\nMORE MONEY BECAUSE OF THEIR ENJOYMENT OF AND COMMITMENT TO KIDS.\n\nI AM HONORED TO COME AND TALK WITH YOU ABOUT STRESS AND TO HELP YOU DISCOVER WAYS TO RELIEVE YOUR STRESS. I PLAN TO TALK FOR A BIT, SHARE SOME IDEAS WITH YOU, \n\nAND THEN OPEN IT UP TO THE CONVERSATION WITH YOU QUESTIONS, COMMENTS AND IDEAS.\n\nBENJAMIN FRANKLIN SAID “THE ONLY THING CERTAIN IN LIFE IS DEATH AND TAXES.” I THINK HE COULD HAVE ADDED STRESS TO THE LIST!\n\nTERM STRESS FIRST COINED AROUND 1936 BY AN AUSTRIAN ENDOCRINOLOGIST NAMED HANS SELYE. HE INITIALLY DEFINED IT AS “THE NON-SPECIFIC RESPONSE OF THE BODY TO ANY \n\nDEMAND FOR CHANGE” (FOR WHICH HE SUBSEQUENTLY CALLED A “STRESSOR”). HOWEVER, STRESS HAS BEEN NOTORIOUSLY DIFFICULT TO DEFINE AND TO STUDY SCIENTIFICALLY AND \n\nSELYE HIMSELF SAID IN HIS 90S: “OH EVERYONE KNOWS WHAT STRESS IS, BUT NOBODY REALLY KNOWS!)\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nHONORED TO BE HERE TODAY. I HAVE ENORMOUS RESPECT FOR CHILD CARE PROVIDERS. BOTH OF MY CHILDREN WHO ARE NOW 14 AND 17 WERE IN CHILD CARE, PART OF THE TIME\n\n THROUGH KIDS UNLIMITED AND THE JCC. MY KIDS WERE IN DAY CARE PART OR FULL-TIME SINCE THEY WERE ABOUT THREE MONTHS OLD, SO I KNOW HOW HARD CHILD CARE \n\nWORKERS JOBS ARE. I ALSO KNOW THAT MOST CHILDCARE WORKERS ARE VERY DEDICATED AND LOVE WORKING WITH CHILDREN, CHOOSING THIS JOB OVER OTHERS THAT MAY PAY \n\nMORE MONEY BECAUSE OF THEIR ENJOYMENT OF AND COMMITMENT TO KIDS.\n\nI AM HONORED TO COME AND TALK WITH YOU ABOUT STRESS AND TO HELP YOU DISCOVER WAYS TO RELIEVE YOUR STRESS. I PLAN TO TALK FOR A BIT, SHARE SOME IDEAS WITH YOU, \n\nAND THEN OPEN IT UP TO THE CONVERSATION WITH YOU QUESTIONS, COMMENTS AND IDEAS.\n\nBENJAMIN FRANKLIN SAID “THE ONLY THING CERTAIN IN LIFE IS DEATH AND TAXES.” I THINK HE COULD HAVE ADDED STRESS TO THE LIST!\n\nTERM STRESS FIRST COINED AROUND 1936 BY AN AUSTRIAN ENDOCRINOLOGIST NAMED HANS SELYE. HE INITIALLY DEFINED IT AS “THE NON-SPECIFIC RESPONSE OF THE BODY TO ANY \n\nDEMAND FOR CHANGE” (FOR WHICH HE SUBSEQUENTLY CALLED A “STRESSOR”). HOWEVER, STRESS HAS BEEN NOTORIOUSLY DIFFICULT TO DEFINE AND TO STUDY SCIENTIFICALLY AND \n\nSELYE HIMSELF SAID IN HIS 90S: “OH EVERYONE KNOWS WHAT STRESS IS, BUT NOBODY REALLY KNOWS!)\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n
  • So, let’s focus on stress. What is it? Stress is usually defined as overwhelming feelings of lack of control over our environment and an inability to change things. \n\nAccording to the American Institute of Stress, stress tends to be more pervasive, persistent and insidious because it stems primarily from psychological than physical threats.  It is associated with ingrained and immediate reactions over which we have no control that were originally designed to be beneficial such as:\nheart rate and blood pressure soar to increase the flow of blood to the brain to improve decision making, \nblood sugar rises to furnish more fuel for energy as the result of the breakdown of glycogen, fat and protein stores, \nblood is shunted away from the gut, where it is not immediately needed for purposes of digestion, to the large muscles of the arms and legs to provide more strength in combat, or greater speed in getting away from a scene of potential peril. Blood away from the gut might result in some odd feelings in the digestive track, especially after eating. Your body may not digest food as comfortably. Also, blood to the large muscles might result in some feelings of heaviness over time, \nclotting occurs more quickly to prevent blood loss from lacerations or internal hemorrhage. \n
  • ROBERT SAPOLSKY, WHY ZEBRAS DON’T GET ULCERS, STANFORD BIOLOGIST. \n\nZEBRAS RUN WHEN THEY HAVE FLIGHT FIGHT REACTION, THEY THEY MOVE ON AND DON’T WORRY AND ANTICIPATE LIKE WE DO. THIS IS ONE OF THE SIDE EFFECTS OF OUR BIG BRAINS THAT LETS US CREATE AMAZING THINGS BUT ALSO CREATES UNNECESSARY WORRY AND ANXIETY.\n\n\n\n
  • THE PROBLEM FOR HUMANS IS THAT WE DON’T JUST GET STRESSED IN THE LIFE-AND-DEATH SITUATIONS WE MIGHT EXPERIENCE, LIKE WHEN THE GUY ON THE HIGHWAY MISSES US BY INCHES AND WE FEEL THAT JOLT OF ANXIETY, LIKE AN ELECTRIC SHOCK SHOOT THROUGH OUR BODIES.\n\nTHE THINGS THAT TEND TO STRESS US THE MOST ARE THE DAY TO DAY CHRONIC STRESSORS THAT OUR BODIES REACT TO WITH A FIGHT-FLIGHT RESPONSE EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE NOT REALLY DANGEROUS, SUCH AS BEING STUCK IN TRAFFIC, HAVING THE GUY WHO TAKES OUR PARKING SPOT, BEING CUT OFF ON THE HIGHWAY BY THE PERSON WHO JUST HAS TO GET ONE CAR LENGTH IN FRONT OF YOU.\n\nWAITING IN LINE AT THE GROCERY STORE, AIRPORT, PHARMACY, LISTENING TO CHILDREN CRY AND NOT BEING ABLE TO ESCAPE. (STORY ABOUT SCOOBY AND HOW THE PERSON BEHIND ME WENT TO THE NEXT CHECKOUT WHERE THE WOMAN CHECKED OUT THREE PEOPLES CARTS WHILE SCOOBY CHECKED OUT MINE ONLY--AGGRAVATED, FRUSTRATED). THE DESCRIPTION OF ROB, WHO THE MOMENT HE GETS IN THE CAR BEGINS DRIVING STRESSFULLY AND QUICKLY AS IF HE IS LATE. TOM SAYS WE ARE NOT LATE, HE SAYS, OH YEAH!\n
  • Stress is normal up to a point and can be optimal for certain performance related tasks. Stress becomes a problem when it interferes with a person’s ability to do daily life tasks over a period of a few weeks or impacts their health in a dangerous or risky way. \n\n
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  • Stress is linked to the six leading causes of death--heart disease, cancer, lung ailments, accidents, cirrhosis of the liver, and suicide\n\n43% of all adults suffer adverse health effects from stress\n75 to 90% of all physician office visits are for stress-related ailments and complaints.\n(American Psychological Association)\n\n
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  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • Key findings of APA’s 2010 Stress in America Survey:\n\nMost common physical symptoms of stress reported were irritablity (45%), fatigue (41%) and lack of energy or motivation (38%)\n\nSurvey findings consistently found over last three years that the majority of americans are living with a moderate amount of stress (from 1-10 on 10 point scale) or high amount.\n\nNo 1 symptoms of tress reported was irritability or anger.\n\nOver half of Americans surveyed indicated that their work productivity suffered due to stress and that they had even considered looking for a new job because of stress. \n
  • How many people turn to food for comfort or relief from stress? Eating can serve as a distraction from negative stressors as well as a coping mechanism. If you’re feeling under pressure at work, do you get an urge to go to the vending machine or step out for another snack even though you may not be hungry or have already eaten breakfast or lunch? Do you walk straight to the refrigerator when you get home? Do you sit in front of your TV at night and munch on food beyond what you ate for dinner? I’m sure you have heard that eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity can lead to weight gain. And being overweight can be a risk factor for physical ailments such a heart disease and diabetes. How much you eat and what you eat can affect how you feel physically and mentally. If you’re eating well-balanced meals and snacks that make you feel energized and healthy, then you will be better able to deal with stress.\n\nHaving a cocktail after a difficult day seems like an easy and quick solution to dealing with stress. However, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or some other substance to cope with stress can be harmful. \nWhile some research suggests that small amounts of alcohol may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, there is widespread agreement that heavier drinking can lead to health problems. In fact, 100,000 Americans die from alcohol-related causes each year. Short-term effects include memory loss, hangovers, and blackouts. Long-term problems associated with heavy drinking include stomach ailments, heart problems, cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and liver cirrhosis. Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression, or anxiety.\nAccording to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, for most adults, moderate alcohol use--up to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women and older people--causes few if any problems. One drink equals one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. \nDecrease alcohol consumption – if you’re drinking more than two alcoholic beverages at a meal or just consuming alcohol without food, try cutting back to just one drink. Consider one glass of red wine with dinner instead of hard alcohol, beer or several glasses of wine. Cut back the number of times per week that you consumer alcohol.\nSubstitute alcohol with a non-alcoholic beverage \nChange your home environment – cut back or eliminate the amount of alcohol and beer you keep in your home. \nGet support if necessary - If you experience a strong need to drink or have problems stopping once you’ve started to drink, or a family member or friend has expressed concern about your drinking behavior, then consider getting help.\n
  • How many people turn to food for comfort or relief from stress? Eating can serve as a distraction from negative stressors as well as a coping mechanism. If you’re feeling under pressure at work, do you get an urge to go to the vending machine or step out for another snack even though you may not be hungry or have already eaten breakfast or lunch? Do you walk straight to the refrigerator when you get home? Do you sit in front of your TV at night and munch on food beyond what you ate for dinner? I’m sure you have heard that eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity can lead to weight gain. And being overweight can be a risk factor for physical ailments such a heart disease and diabetes. How much you eat and what you eat can affect how you feel physically and mentally. If you’re eating well-balanced meals and snacks that make you feel energized and healthy, then you will be better able to deal with stress.\n\nHaving a cocktail after a difficult day seems like an easy and quick solution to dealing with stress. However, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or some other substance to cope with stress can be harmful. \nWhile some research suggests that small amounts of alcohol may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, there is widespread agreement that heavier drinking can lead to health problems. In fact, 100,000 Americans die from alcohol-related causes each year. Short-term effects include memory loss, hangovers, and blackouts. Long-term problems associated with heavy drinking include stomach ailments, heart problems, cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and liver cirrhosis. Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression, or anxiety.\nAccording to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, for most adults, moderate alcohol use--up to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women and older people--causes few if any problems. One drink equals one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. \nDecrease alcohol consumption – if you’re drinking more than two alcoholic beverages at a meal or just consuming alcohol without food, try cutting back to just one drink. Consider one glass of red wine with dinner instead of hard alcohol, beer or several glasses of wine. Cut back the number of times per week that you consumer alcohol.\nSubstitute alcohol with a non-alcoholic beverage \nChange your home environment – cut back or eliminate the amount of alcohol and beer you keep in your home. \nGet support if necessary - If you experience a strong need to drink or have problems stopping once you’ve started to drink, or a family member or friend has expressed concern about your drinking behavior, then consider getting help.\n
  • How many people turn to food for comfort or relief from stress? Eating can serve as a distraction from negative stressors as well as a coping mechanism. If you’re feeling under pressure at work, do you get an urge to go to the vending machine or step out for another snack even though you may not be hungry or have already eaten breakfast or lunch? Do you walk straight to the refrigerator when you get home? Do you sit in front of your TV at night and munch on food beyond what you ate for dinner? I’m sure you have heard that eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity can lead to weight gain. And being overweight can be a risk factor for physical ailments such a heart disease and diabetes. How much you eat and what you eat can affect how you feel physically and mentally. If you’re eating well-balanced meals and snacks that make you feel energized and healthy, then you will be better able to deal with stress.\n\nHaving a cocktail after a difficult day seems like an easy and quick solution to dealing with stress. However, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or some other substance to cope with stress can be harmful. \nWhile some research suggests that small amounts of alcohol may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, there is widespread agreement that heavier drinking can lead to health problems. In fact, 100,000 Americans die from alcohol-related causes each year. Short-term effects include memory loss, hangovers, and blackouts. Long-term problems associated with heavy drinking include stomach ailments, heart problems, cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and liver cirrhosis. Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression, or anxiety.\nAccording to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, for most adults, moderate alcohol use--up to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women and older people--causes few if any problems. One drink equals one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. \nDecrease alcohol consumption – if you’re drinking more than two alcoholic beverages at a meal or just consuming alcohol without food, try cutting back to just one drink. Consider one glass of red wine with dinner instead of hard alcohol, beer or several glasses of wine. Cut back the number of times per week that you consumer alcohol.\nSubstitute alcohol with a non-alcoholic beverage \nChange your home environment – cut back or eliminate the amount of alcohol and beer you keep in your home. \nGet support if necessary - If you experience a strong need to drink or have problems stopping once you’ve started to drink, or a family member or friend has expressed concern about your drinking behavior, then consider getting help.\n
  • How many people turn to food for comfort or relief from stress? Eating can serve as a distraction from negative stressors as well as a coping mechanism. If you’re feeling under pressure at work, do you get an urge to go to the vending machine or step out for another snack even though you may not be hungry or have already eaten breakfast or lunch? Do you walk straight to the refrigerator when you get home? Do you sit in front of your TV at night and munch on food beyond what you ate for dinner? I’m sure you have heard that eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity can lead to weight gain. And being overweight can be a risk factor for physical ailments such a heart disease and diabetes. How much you eat and what you eat can affect how you feel physically and mentally. If you’re eating well-balanced meals and snacks that make you feel energized and healthy, then you will be better able to deal with stress.\n\nHaving a cocktail after a difficult day seems like an easy and quick solution to dealing with stress. However, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or some other substance to cope with stress can be harmful. \nWhile some research suggests that small amounts of alcohol may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, there is widespread agreement that heavier drinking can lead to health problems. In fact, 100,000 Americans die from alcohol-related causes each year. Short-term effects include memory loss, hangovers, and blackouts. Long-term problems associated with heavy drinking include stomach ailments, heart problems, cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and liver cirrhosis. Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression, or anxiety.\nAccording to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, for most adults, moderate alcohol use--up to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women and older people--causes few if any problems. One drink equals one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. \nDecrease alcohol consumption – if you’re drinking more than two alcoholic beverages at a meal or just consuming alcohol without food, try cutting back to just one drink. Consider one glass of red wine with dinner instead of hard alcohol, beer or several glasses of wine. Cut back the number of times per week that you consumer alcohol.\nSubstitute alcohol with a non-alcoholic beverage \nChange your home environment – cut back or eliminate the amount of alcohol and beer you keep in your home. \nGet support if necessary - If you experience a strong need to drink or have problems stopping once you’ve started to drink, or a family member or friend has expressed concern about your drinking behavior, then consider getting help.\n
  • How many people turn to food for comfort or relief from stress? Eating can serve as a distraction from negative stressors as well as a coping mechanism. If you’re feeling under pressure at work, do you get an urge to go to the vending machine or step out for another snack even though you may not be hungry or have already eaten breakfast or lunch? Do you walk straight to the refrigerator when you get home? Do you sit in front of your TV at night and munch on food beyond what you ate for dinner? I’m sure you have heard that eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity can lead to weight gain. And being overweight can be a risk factor for physical ailments such a heart disease and diabetes. How much you eat and what you eat can affect how you feel physically and mentally. If you’re eating well-balanced meals and snacks that make you feel energized and healthy, then you will be better able to deal with stress.\n\nHaving a cocktail after a difficult day seems like an easy and quick solution to dealing with stress. However, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or some other substance to cope with stress can be harmful. \nWhile some research suggests that small amounts of alcohol may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, there is widespread agreement that heavier drinking can lead to health problems. In fact, 100,000 Americans die from alcohol-related causes each year. Short-term effects include memory loss, hangovers, and blackouts. Long-term problems associated with heavy drinking include stomach ailments, heart problems, cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and liver cirrhosis. Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression, or anxiety.\nAccording to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, for most adults, moderate alcohol use--up to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women and older people--causes few if any problems. One drink equals one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. \nDecrease alcohol consumption – if you’re drinking more than two alcoholic beverages at a meal or just consuming alcohol without food, try cutting back to just one drink. Consider one glass of red wine with dinner instead of hard alcohol, beer or several glasses of wine. Cut back the number of times per week that you consumer alcohol.\nSubstitute alcohol with a non-alcoholic beverage \nChange your home environment – cut back or eliminate the amount of alcohol and beer you keep in your home. \nGet support if necessary - If you experience a strong need to drink or have problems stopping once you’ve started to drink, or a family member or friend has expressed concern about your drinking behavior, then consider getting help.\n
  • How many people turn to food for comfort or relief from stress? Eating can serve as a distraction from negative stressors as well as a coping mechanism. If you’re feeling under pressure at work, do you get an urge to go to the vending machine or step out for another snack even though you may not be hungry or have already eaten breakfast or lunch? Do you walk straight to the refrigerator when you get home? Do you sit in front of your TV at night and munch on food beyond what you ate for dinner? I’m sure you have heard that eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity can lead to weight gain. And being overweight can be a risk factor for physical ailments such a heart disease and diabetes. How much you eat and what you eat can affect how you feel physically and mentally. If you’re eating well-balanced meals and snacks that make you feel energized and healthy, then you will be better able to deal with stress.\n\nHaving a cocktail after a difficult day seems like an easy and quick solution to dealing with stress. However, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or some other substance to cope with stress can be harmful. \nWhile some research suggests that small amounts of alcohol may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, there is widespread agreement that heavier drinking can lead to health problems. In fact, 100,000 Americans die from alcohol-related causes each year. Short-term effects include memory loss, hangovers, and blackouts. Long-term problems associated with heavy drinking include stomach ailments, heart problems, cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and liver cirrhosis. Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression, or anxiety.\nAccording to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, for most adults, moderate alcohol use--up to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women and older people--causes few if any problems. One drink equals one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. \nDecrease alcohol consumption – if you’re drinking more than two alcoholic beverages at a meal or just consuming alcohol without food, try cutting back to just one drink. Consider one glass of red wine with dinner instead of hard alcohol, beer or several glasses of wine. Cut back the number of times per week that you consumer alcohol.\nSubstitute alcohol with a non-alcoholic beverage \nChange your home environment – cut back or eliminate the amount of alcohol and beer you keep in your home. \nGet support if necessary - If you experience a strong need to drink or have problems stopping once you’ve started to drink, or a family member or friend has expressed concern about your drinking behavior, then consider getting help.\n
  • How many people turn to food for comfort or relief from stress? Eating can serve as a distraction from negative stressors as well as a coping mechanism. If you’re feeling under pressure at work, do you get an urge to go to the vending machine or step out for another snack even though you may not be hungry or have already eaten breakfast or lunch? Do you walk straight to the refrigerator when you get home? Do you sit in front of your TV at night and munch on food beyond what you ate for dinner? I’m sure you have heard that eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity can lead to weight gain. And being overweight can be a risk factor for physical ailments such a heart disease and diabetes. How much you eat and what you eat can affect how you feel physically and mentally. If you’re eating well-balanced meals and snacks that make you feel energized and healthy, then you will be better able to deal with stress.\n\nHaving a cocktail after a difficult day seems like an easy and quick solution to dealing with stress. However, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or some other substance to cope with stress can be harmful. \nWhile some research suggests that small amounts of alcohol may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, there is widespread agreement that heavier drinking can lead to health problems. In fact, 100,000 Americans die from alcohol-related causes each year. Short-term effects include memory loss, hangovers, and blackouts. Long-term problems associated with heavy drinking include stomach ailments, heart problems, cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and liver cirrhosis. Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression, or anxiety.\nAccording to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, for most adults, moderate alcohol use--up to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women and older people--causes few if any problems. One drink equals one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. \nDecrease alcohol consumption – if you’re drinking more than two alcoholic beverages at a meal or just consuming alcohol without food, try cutting back to just one drink. Consider one glass of red wine with dinner instead of hard alcohol, beer or several glasses of wine. Cut back the number of times per week that you consumer alcohol.\nSubstitute alcohol with a non-alcoholic beverage \nChange your home environment – cut back or eliminate the amount of alcohol and beer you keep in your home. \nGet support if necessary - If you experience a strong need to drink or have problems stopping once you’ve started to drink, or a family member or friend has expressed concern about your drinking behavior, then consider getting help.\n
  • How many people turn to food for comfort or relief from stress? Eating can serve as a distraction from negative stressors as well as a coping mechanism. If you’re feeling under pressure at work, do you get an urge to go to the vending machine or step out for another snack even though you may not be hungry or have already eaten breakfast or lunch? Do you walk straight to the refrigerator when you get home? Do you sit in front of your TV at night and munch on food beyond what you ate for dinner? I’m sure you have heard that eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity can lead to weight gain. And being overweight can be a risk factor for physical ailments such a heart disease and diabetes. How much you eat and what you eat can affect how you feel physically and mentally. If you’re eating well-balanced meals and snacks that make you feel energized and healthy, then you will be better able to deal with stress.\n\nHaving a cocktail after a difficult day seems like an easy and quick solution to dealing with stress. However, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or some other substance to cope with stress can be harmful. \nWhile some research suggests that small amounts of alcohol may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, there is widespread agreement that heavier drinking can lead to health problems. In fact, 100,000 Americans die from alcohol-related causes each year. Short-term effects include memory loss, hangovers, and blackouts. Long-term problems associated with heavy drinking include stomach ailments, heart problems, cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and liver cirrhosis. Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression, or anxiety.\nAccording to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, for most adults, moderate alcohol use--up to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women and older people--causes few if any problems. One drink equals one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. \nDecrease alcohol consumption – if you’re drinking more than two alcoholic beverages at a meal or just consuming alcohol without food, try cutting back to just one drink. Consider one glass of red wine with dinner instead of hard alcohol, beer or several glasses of wine. Cut back the number of times per week that you consumer alcohol.\nSubstitute alcohol with a non-alcoholic beverage \nChange your home environment – cut back or eliminate the amount of alcohol and beer you keep in your home. \nGet support if necessary - If you experience a strong need to drink or have problems stopping once you’ve started to drink, or a family member or friend has expressed concern about your drinking behavior, then consider getting help.\n
  • How many people turn to food for comfort or relief from stress? Eating can serve as a distraction from negative stressors as well as a coping mechanism. If you’re feeling under pressure at work, do you get an urge to go to the vending machine or step out for another snack even though you may not be hungry or have already eaten breakfast or lunch? Do you walk straight to the refrigerator when you get home? Do you sit in front of your TV at night and munch on food beyond what you ate for dinner? I’m sure you have heard that eating too many calories and not getting enough physical activity can lead to weight gain. And being overweight can be a risk factor for physical ailments such a heart disease and diabetes. How much you eat and what you eat can affect how you feel physically and mentally. If you’re eating well-balanced meals and snacks that make you feel energized and healthy, then you will be better able to deal with stress.\n\nHaving a cocktail after a difficult day seems like an easy and quick solution to dealing with stress. However, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or some other substance to cope with stress can be harmful. \nWhile some research suggests that small amounts of alcohol may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, there is widespread agreement that heavier drinking can lead to health problems. In fact, 100,000 Americans die from alcohol-related causes each year. Short-term effects include memory loss, hangovers, and blackouts. Long-term problems associated with heavy drinking include stomach ailments, heart problems, cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and liver cirrhosis. Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression, or anxiety.\nAccording to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, for most adults, moderate alcohol use--up to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women and older people--causes few if any problems. One drink equals one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. \nDecrease alcohol consumption – if you’re drinking more than two alcoholic beverages at a meal or just consuming alcohol without food, try cutting back to just one drink. Consider one glass of red wine with dinner instead of hard alcohol, beer or several glasses of wine. Cut back the number of times per week that you consumer alcohol.\nSubstitute alcohol with a non-alcoholic beverage \nChange your home environment – cut back or eliminate the amount of alcohol and beer you keep in your home. \nGet support if necessary - If you experience a strong need to drink or have problems stopping once you’ve started to drink, or a family member or friend has expressed concern about your drinking behavior, then consider getting help.\n
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  • BARBARA FREDRICKSON IS A RESEARCH PSYCHOLOGIST AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WHO STUDIES THE EFFECTS OF BEHAVIOR ON POSITIVE MOOD. SHE DID A STUDY WITH FACTORY WORKERS THAT FOUND THAT 70 TO 80 MINUTES A WEEK OF MEDITATION HAD A VERY SIGNIFICANT AND LASTING EFFECT ON MOOD, STRESS LEVEL AND OTHER HEALTH INDICATORS.\n\nSELIGMAN AND OTHERS HAVE FOUND THAT HAPPINESS AND LIFE SATISFACTION INCREASES WHEN WE IDENTIFY AND USE OUR STRENGTHS ON A DAILY BASIS. WE CAN USE THEM ANYWHERE (EG., IN THE GROCERY STORE LINE WITH SCOOBY)\n
  • BARBARA FREDRICKSON IS A RESEARCH PSYCHOLOGIST AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WHO STUDIES THE EFFECTS OF BEHAVIOR ON POSITIVE MOOD. SHE DID A STUDY WITH FACTORY WORKERS THAT FOUND THAT 70 TO 80 MINUTES A WEEK OF MEDITATION HAD A VERY SIGNIFICANT AND LASTING EFFECT ON MOOD, STRESS LEVEL AND OTHER HEALTH INDICATORS.\n\nSELIGMAN AND OTHERS HAVE FOUND THAT HAPPINESS AND LIFE SATISFACTION INCREASES WHEN WE IDENTIFY AND USE OUR STRENGTHS ON A DAILY BASIS. WE CAN USE THEM ANYWHERE (EG., IN THE GROCERY STORE LINE WITH SCOOBY)\n
  • This is about cultivating mindfulness ---Expression from BINGO, “You must be PRESENT to win”. When we begin to pay attention, to be fully preent in the present, the more efficiently, comfortably, and calmly we go through life. The reward is that we celebrate in smalle ways, the passage through each day, honoring each activity.\n\nFlow a term coined by Mike C refers to the concept that we think of about being in the Zone, when time passes quickly and slowly at the same time, we are really engaged, and we lose track of time. For me that often occurs in conversation. My clients and I both feel sometimes that only 10 minutes has passed when has been nearly an hour. Passive activities do not put us in the state of flow....such as watching TV. \n\nMindful waking, mindful tooth brushing, mindful bathing, mindful sipping of tea. We will reminesce and plan but the more time we spend being mindful also the more we will enjoy our life.\n
  • This is about cultivating mindfulness ---Expression from BINGO, “You must be PRESENT to win”. When we begin to pay attention, to be fully preent in the present, the more efficiently, comfortably, and calmly we go through life. The reward is that we celebrate in smalle ways, the passage through each day, honoring each activity.\n\nFlow a term coined by Mike C refers to the concept that we think of about being in the Zone, when time passes quickly and slowly at the same time, we are really engaged, and we lose track of time. For me that often occurs in conversation. My clients and I both feel sometimes that only 10 minutes has passed when has been nearly an hour. Passive activities do not put us in the state of flow....such as watching TV. \n\nMindful waking, mindful tooth brushing, mindful bathing, mindful sipping of tea. We will reminesce and plan but the more time we spend being mindful also the more we will enjoy our life.\n
  • The brain likes novelty; it benefits from change and stimulation just like our muscles increase when we change up our exercise routine. Novelty and change also increase dopamine which is linked to happy feelings (chocolate and falling in love increase dopamine!). Do something new everyday--find a different route to walk or drive, listen to new music, eat a new food. What could you do new every day?\nEvery day ask look for one new thing to do.\n\nDo something good for someone else every day. Research shows that the pay it forward concept is real and that it increase our good mood to do something nice for someone else and it improves their mood. They also are then more likely to do something nice for someone else.In the current study, Fowler and Christakis show that when one person gives money to help others in a "public-goods game," where people have the opportunity to cooperate with each other, the recipients are more likely to give their own money away to other people in future games. This creates a domino effect in which one person's generosity spreads first to three people and then to the nine people that those three people interact with in the future, and then to still other individuals in subsequent waves of the experimeWhen people benefit from kindness they "pay it forward" by helping others who were not originally involved, and this creates a cascade of cooperation that influences dozens more in a social network. How powerful!!\nThe research was conducted by James Fowler from UC San Diego Nicholas Christakis of Harvard\n
  • Count down from 10 to 1\n\nCount up to 4, count down to one\n\nCount spaces 123\n\nI am on in breath, on outbreath at peace (Thich Nhat Hanh)\n\nSquare breathing--visualize square. inbreath vertical and horizontal; outbreath complete the square, vertical and horizontal\n
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  • Coping With Stress

    1. 1. COPING WITH STRESS On the index card you were given please answer the following.1. List two or three things you find most stressful atwork or at home.2. What is your preferred way to de-stress?3. What questions do you have about managing stress? 1
    2. 2. Coping with Stress presented by Dr. Chris Allen,Psychologist, Executive Coach, and Certified PeopleMap Trainer 2
    3. 3. STRESSOverwhelming feelings oflack of control over ourenvironment and aninability to change things 3
    4. 4. STRESSStress is pervasive,persistent and insidiousbecause it stems frompsychological rather thanphysical threats (AmericanInstitute of Stress) 4
    5. 5. “Any idiot canface a crisis - itsday to day livingthat wears youout.”Anton Chekhov 5
    6. 6. Stress and the BodyStress is normal up to a point and canbe optimal for certain performancerelated tasks.Stress becomes a problem when itinterferes with a person’s ability to dodaily life tasks over a period of a fewweeks or impacts their health in adangerous or risky way. 6
    7. 7. The Relationshipbetween Stress and Productivity 7
    8. 8. The Facts About Stress• Stress is linked to the six leading causes of death--heart disease, cancer, lung ailments, accidents, cirrhosis of the liver, and suicide• 43% of all adults suffer adverse health effects from stress ("The Stress Solution: An Action Plan to Manage the Stress in Your Life", Lyle H. Miller, Ph.D., and Alma Dell Smith, Ph.D.)• Two-thirds of all office visits to family physicians are due to stress-related symptoms (American Academy of Family Physicians) 8
    9. 9. Stress and Heart DiseaseResearch shows that stress can…• have direct effects on development of coronary heart disease• increase heart rate and heart contraction force• affect blood ow 9
    10. 10. Symptoms of Stress 10
    11. 11. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed 10
    12. 12. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious 10
    13. 13. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings 10
    14. 14. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper 10
    15. 15. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired 10
    16. 16. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired• Headaches and body aches 10
    17. 17. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired• Headaches and body aches• Tightness in muscles 10
    18. 18. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired• Headaches and body aches• Tightness in muscles• Back and neck pain 10
    19. 19. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired• Headaches and body aches• Tightness in muscles• Back and neck pain• Anger 10
    20. 20. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired• Headaches and body aches• Tightness in muscles• Back and neck pain• Anger• Depression 10
    21. 21. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired• Headaches and body aches• Tightness in muscles• Back and neck pain• Anger• Depression• Heart palpitations 10
    22. 22. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired• Headaches and body aches• Tightness in muscles• Back and neck pain• Anger• Depression• Heart palpitations• Irregular menstruation cycles 10
    23. 23. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired• Headaches and body aches• Tightness in muscles• Back and neck pain• Anger• Depression• Heart palpitations• Irregular menstruation cycles• Loss of sexual function 10
    24. 24. Symptoms of Stress• Feeling overwhelmed• Anxious• Mood swings• Short temper• Rundown and tired• Headaches and body aches• Tightness in muscles• Back and neck pain• Anger• Depression• Heart palpitations• Irregular menstruation cycles• Loss of sexual function• Loss of sexual desire 10
    25. 25. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with 11
    26. 26. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with• Overeating and/or unhealthy eating 11
    27. 27. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with• Overeating and/or unhealthy eating• Not eating 11
    28. 28. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with• Overeating and/or unhealthy eating• Not eating• Excessive amounts of caffeinated beverages 11
    29. 29. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with• Overeating and/or unhealthy eating• Not eating• Excessive amounts of caffeinated beverages• Smoking 11
    30. 30. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with• Overeating and/or unhealthy eating• Not eating• Excessive amounts of caffeinated beverages• Smoking• Use of alcohol or other substances 11
    31. 31. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with• Overeating and/or unhealthy eating• Not eating• Excessive amounts of caffeinated beverages• Smoking• Use of alcohol or other substances• Inactivity 11
    32. 32. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with• Overeating and/or • Not enough sleep or unhealthy eating rest• Not eating• Excessive amounts of caffeinated beverages• Smoking• Use of alcohol or other substances• Inactivity 11
    33. 33. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with• Overeating and/or • Not enough sleep or unhealthy eating rest• Not eating • Overcommitting• Excessive amounts of yourself caffeinated beverages• Smoking• Use of alcohol or other substances• Inactivity 11
    34. 34. Unhealthy Ways to Cope with• Overeating and/or • Not enough sleep or unhealthy eating rest• Not eating • Overcommitting• Excessive amounts of yourself caffeinated beverages • Too much “screen” time• Smoking• Use of alcohol or other substances• Inactivity 11
    35. 35. Simple Tips to Stay Healthy when Your Life or Job Stress is High (from my blogpost at www.chrisallencoaching.com) 12
    36. 36. Simple Tips to Stay Healthy when Your Life or Job Stress is High (from my blogpost at www.chrisallencoaching.com)1.Don’t be isolated. Have at least one or two people in your life that you spend time with, talk to and socialize with. Loneliness and social isolation is associated with a number of health and mental health problems. 12
    37. 37. Simple Tips to Stay Healthy when Your Life or Job Stress is High (from my blogpost at www.chrisallencoaching.com)1.Don’t be isolated. Have at least one or two people in your life that you spend time with, talk to and socialize with. Loneliness and social isolation is associated with a number of health and mental health problems.2.Set minimum guidelines or standards for yourself for sleep, exercise, etc. For example, make sure you get 8 hours of sleep 4 nights a week, even if you have to burn the midnight oil a few other nights (figure out where you can stick to these healthy behaviors). Don’t get caught up in a prolonged cycle without adequate sleep or exercise. There is a lot of research on the benefits of exercise for the brain. 12
    38. 38. Simple Tips to Stay Healthy when Your Life or Job Stress is High (from my blogpost at www.chrisallencoaching.com) 13
    39. 39. Simple Tips to Stay Healthy when Your Life or Job Stress is High (from my blogpost at www.chrisallencoaching.com)3. Find 5-10 minutes a day to practice mindfulnessmeditation (especially loving-kindness meditation).Research has demonstrated that even 70 minutes total ofmeditation a week significantly improves mood and health.(See Barbara Fredrickson’s website:www.positivityratio.com). 13
    40. 40. Simple Tips to Stay Healthy when Your Life or Job Stress is High (from my blogpost at www.chrisallencoaching.com)3. Find 5-10 minutes a day to practice mindfulnessmeditation (especially loving-kindness meditation).Research has demonstrated that even 70 minutes total ofmeditation a week significantly improves mood and health.(See Barbara Fredrickson’s website:www.positivityratio.com).4. Identify your strengths (www.strengthsfinder.com orwww.authentichappiness.com) and your core values (whatyou really care about and want your life to be for) and usethe strengths and values everyday. This gives evenstressful life meaning and purpose and is protective ofhealth and well-being. 13
    41. 41. Simple Tips to Stay Healthy when Your Life or Job Stress is High (from my blogpost at www.chrisallencoaching.com) 14
    42. 42. Simple Tips to Stay Healthy when Your Life or Job Stress is High (from my blogpost at www.chrisallencoaching.com)5. Be present in your life. Stay in the now. You are more likelyto experience “flow,” a process of genuine engagement in lifethat makes life more satisfying. We are not in “flow” when wewatch too much TV or space or veg out, for example. Or whenwe just focus on the to-do list… 14
    43. 43. Simple Tips to Stay Healthy when Your Life or Job Stress is High (from my blogpost at www.chrisallencoaching.com)5. Be present in your life. Stay in the now. You are more likelyto experience “flow,” a process of genuine engagement in lifethat makes life more satisfying. We are not in “flow” when wewatch too much TV or space or veg out, for example. Or whenwe just focus on the to-do list…6. Set limits on electronic communications, such times you willcheck e-mail and times you will not (such as three or four timesa day). 14
    44. 44. NEWS AND GOODS from Ann Webster, Ph.D Benson Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine This is easy: do something neweveryday and do something good for someone else! 15
    45. 45. MINIS Ann Webster, Ph.D. Benson-Henry Institute for Mind-Body MedicineMini relaxation exercises are focused breathing techniques that help reducetension and anxiety immediately. Your breath is with you at every moment intime. You can do a Mini with your eyes open or closed (but keep eyes openwhen driving!) You can do a Mini at any place, at any time, and no one willno you are doing it.Good times to do a Mini: while stuck in traffic...when on hold during acall..while waiting at your doctor’s office...when someone says somethingthat bothers you...in the dentist’s chair... when you feel overwhelmed by allyou need to do...while standing in line....when in pain...in the night when youcan’t sleep, etc.THE ONLY TIME MINIS DO NOT WORK IS WHEN YOU DON’T DO THEM 16
    46. 46. 17
    47. 47. What steps will you taketoday and this week to relieve stress? 18

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