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Hooray! starter teacher's book

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Hooray! starter teacher's book

  1. 1. GiiOler GerOgrOSS •Herberl Puchla
  2. 2. Con~nb - Syllabus Hooray! Starter ......... .......... .. . Introduction Course components Structure ......... . . Activities .... . . . . Songs Action Stories .. Stories .......... . . Thinking Skills Some teaching tips ................... . Working with the flashcards Flashcard list . Working with the mini flashcards Working with the hand puppet Working with the Student's Book Working with the Story cards Working with the mini storybooks How young learners learn . The SMILE approach® ................................................ . . How to manage your class Overview of routines . How parents can help Units Unit 1: Hello Unit 2: My toys .. Unit 3: Animals. Unit 4: My body .. Unit 5: My clothes ............. . Unit 6: Food . Extra Unit: Christmas Extra Unit: Easter Appendix Legend ~ G.ii Class Audio CD ~~$ij Worksheet on DVD-ROM [@~~J Student's Book 8 Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages 3 5 5 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 10 10 11 11 11 12 13 14 17 17 .. ... . .... 19 37 55 73 91 . . ..... . . . . ... 109 ........... 127 .. .. . . . . . .... 137 . 144
  3. 3. :r: o o QJ '< VI ~;;>:J ---1 m ;;>:J @ :r: ~ 0- ::> ID r- QJ ::> ID c QJ ID CD Vl CD Syllabus Hooray! Starter Unit Aims Unit 1 • to identify the two characters in Hooray! Starter Hello • to say hello and bye-bye • to count to three • to recognise and name the colours red and blue • to follow some simple instructions and lesson routines in English Unit 2 • to recognise and name some toys My toys • to recognise and name the colour yellow • to find the odd one out in a group of similar items • to join in with actions and mimes for playing with toys and use these in the action story and the songs Unit 3 • to recognise and name some animals Animals • to recognise and name the colour green • to count to four • to join in with some actions to mime different animals in the action story and the songs • to learn noises that animals make in English and use these in songs Unit4 • to recognise and name some body parts My body • to play a game called Simon says to practise following instructions in English • to join in with some actions that involve body parts, for example 'wash your hands' and 'brush your teeth' • to work together with the other children in the class to play games such as Memory Vocabulary and phrases Activities and skills Key Words Song: How are you? • Peter the panda, Rosie the rabbit • Colouring activity. • one, two, three Action story: Hello • red, blue • Acting out and putting the story in order. • butterfly Story and song: The butterfly story and the It's red and blue song • Value: friendship • Tracing and colouring. Thinking Skills: • Matching and adding a sticker. Key Words Song: Look at the teddy/teddy bear (AmEJ • teddy/teddy bear (AmE), doll, plane, • Colouring activity. train Action story: My toys • yellow • Acting out and putting the story in order. • old, new Story and song: The toy shop/store (AmEJ story and the Look at the toy shop/store (AmEJ song • Value: appreciating what you have • Adding stickers and colouring. Thinking Skills: • Finding and circling the odd one out. Key Words Song: One dog, two dogs • dog, cat, cow, spider • Counting and circling. • green Action story: Animals • four • Acting out and putting the story in order. • big, small Story and song: The baby cats story and The happy animals song • Value: caring for animals • Adding stickers and circling. Thinking Skills: • Finding and matching. Key Words Song: Wash your hands • hands, teeth, eyes, nose, mouth • Colouring activity. • robot Action story: My body ! • Acting out and putting the story in order. I Story and song: The robot story and the Let's make a robot song • Value: being creative • Adding stickers and tracing the lines. Thinking Skills: • Finding and matching.
  4. 4. et :r: o o QJ '< Vl ~;;U -l m ;;U © :r: ro Q:' ::J .0 r (lJ ::J .0 c (lJ .0 roV1 Unit 5 My clothes Unit 6 Food Extra Unit Christmas Extra Unit Easter • to recognise and name some clothes • to follow instructions about putting on some clothes • to compliment some of their classmates' clothes and how they look • to work together with other children in the class to play games and create a collage (optional activity) • to recognise and name some foods • to listen to and join in with a song about food • to name the foods the children like eating using 'I like... ' and 'Yummy' • to work together with other children in the class to play games • to continue a colour sequence • to learn about Christmas traditions in English speaking countries • to listen to and join in with an English Christmas song • to play some games connected with Christmas • to identify and name some Easter items in English • to learn about Easter traditions in English speaking countries • to listen to and join in with an English Easter song KeyWords Song: Look at my T-shirt • T-shirt, trousers/pants (AmE), shoes, • Colouring activity. skirt Action story: My clothes • Acting out and putting the story in order. Story and song: The You look great story and the What a lovely/nice (AmE) T-shirt song • Value: complimenting someone on their looks • Adding stickers and colouring. Thinking Skills: • Colouring the puzzle pieces. Key Words Song: I'm so hungry • pizza, salad, soup, milk, spaghetti • Colouring and adding stickers. Action story: Food • Acting out and putting the story in order. Story and song: The dinner story and the Yummy song • Value: eating together • Circling and colouring. Thinking Skills: • Continuing a colour sequence. Key Words Song: We wish you a Merry Christmas • Christmas tree, present • Tracing and colouring. • Merry Christmas Thinking Skills: • Finding and circling. Key Words Song: Easter bunny • Easter bunny, Easter eggs • Colouring activity.
  5. 5. " Introduction Hooray! Starter is a comprehensive course for teaching English to 3-year-old children in kindergarten. Its main aim is to teach learning through play. Hooray! introduces children to basic listening and speaking skills in English using simple principles for young learners: Jeveloping listening skills is extremely important at • is age, so children are encouraged to listen and understand right from the beginning. They are also encouraged to use all of their senses to understand and reproduce the language they are introduced to so ~ is learned and retained. e course also focuses on building intelligence with the inclusion of a number of activities designed to stimulate children to think and process necessary nformation. In addition, there is a strong emphasis on he development of the memory via the use of music, movement and rhymes. Stories and games are also used widely to stimulate children's interest. Who is the book for? Hooray! Let's play! is a three-level course (Starter, Level A, Level B) for children between the ages of 3 and 5. The course is suitable for all pre-school classrooms learning English, regardless of the number of hours or lessons per week. The course emphasises the use of songs and stories within the classroom - tools which help young children to engage and interact confidently with English at a low level. Hooray! Starter is aimed at 3-year-olds and can be used with children who have not had English classes before. Main aims of the course The main aims of Hooray! Starter are: • that children use all their senses to learn but, at the same time, enjoy themselves and have fun • that children see language as a means of communication • that listening and speaking skills are developed slowly and accurately (although speaking skills should be allowed to develop naturally when children feel confident enough) • to offer a wide range of activities that help the learning process • to encourage the development of the children's social, emotional and spatial skills by encouraging them to work together, to play, resolve problems and reproduce actions and key language • that children experience the act of language learning as a positive one right from the beginning and are enthusiastic and motivated by the activities they are required to do • to develop and encourage an open and inclusive attitude to other people and cultures and to underline and encourage key social values such as the value of friendship and caring for animals • to provide teachers with teaching notes, games and activities for original and up-to-date lessons in the kindergarten classroom COURSE COMPONENTS Student's Book The Student's Book has 56 full-colour pages consisting of four activity worksheets for each of the six main units, with a variety of simple tasks, all featuring Peter the panda and Rosie the rabbit. The worksheets are perforated so they can be easily torn out and used. In addition to the six main units of the book, there are two final shorter units focusing on Christmas and Easter, each with their own worksheets. There is one page of stickers at the end of the Student's Book for children to complete the worksheets with. Children may need help to peel the stickers from the sticker sheet You might also want to cut out the relevant stickers needed for a lesson rather than presenting children with a full page of stickers. The Student's Book also includes a Songs Audio CD. The audio CD contains all the songs from the course so children can practise them at home with their parents. Teacher's Book The Teacher's Book includes detailed teacher's notes for using Hooray! Starter, a Teacher's DVD-ROM and a Class Audio CD. The detailed teacher's notes include a unit overview and a lesson overview outlining the main objective, key words, receptive and classroom language and activities with a materials checklist There are full teaching notes for each stage of the lessons, including step-by-step instructions for all the activities and stories plus scripts of the songs and suggestions for the language that can be used during an activity. Each main unit also has two optional extra lessons for teachers who want more lesson material. These lessons allow teachers to revise the material from the unit and develop it by adding some new activities. Teacher's DVD-ROM The Teacher's DVD-ROM contains: • A Teacher Training Video which shows one of the authors of the course, Herbert Puchta, at work within the kindergarten classroom with children of 3-5 years. It shows how some of the materials and activities can be used within the classroom, applying multi-sensory teaching techniques which focus on the needs and cognitive capabilities of very young learners. • Printable Letters to Parents which can be edited on-screen and inform the parents of their child's progress (See p. 17f. for details). Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages et
  6. 6. • Extra orksheets are used throughout all lessons. works .eets can e pnnted out and used in class or a home. Some of he worksheets will work better if copied onto thicker paper or card . A list of all the extra worksheets can be found in the appendix of the Teacher's Book (See p. 144f.). Class Audio CD The audio CD in the Teacher's Book is for class use and contains all the songs and stories from Hooray! Starter. It also contains the routine songs, TPR action stories and karaoke versions of the songs. Hand Puppet The Peter the panda hand puppet is used in all lessons and can be used to welcome and praise the children, as well as introduce the vocabulary and demonstrate some of the games and activities. Flashcards and Story Cards The Flashcards can be used to introduce and practise key vocabulary. A number of games and activities using the flashcards are listed later in the introduction section (See p. Sf.), and more specific suggestions are included in the lesson plans for each unit. The Story Cards can be used when listening and retelling the stories from the CD to the children . Each scene appears on an individual card with the script on the back of each. STRUCTURE Unit structure Each of the six main units in the Student's Book consists of six Key Lessons, all focusing on a specific topic. The key lessons from each unit provide a complete overview of a topic. The Teacher's Book also provides two Optional Extra Lessons focusing on revising material from the key lessons. These optional lessons are for teachers who teach more lessons per week, for longer courses, or simply for extra practice of the songs and stories when necessary. The vocabulary and topics are introduced through a song and then practised through songs and stories as well as a range of other games and activities. Lesson 1 introduces the children to the new vocabulary through different games and activities. There is no Pencil and Paper activity in this lesson to give the children time to feel confident with the new vocabulary. et Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Lesson 2 uses a song to practise the target vocabulal) for the unit. The worksheet during the Pencil and Paper part of the lesson then reinforces the vocabulary and the order of the vocabulary in the song. Lesson 3 gives further practice of the target vocabulary through revision of the song as well as more games and activities. There is no Pencil and Paper activity in this lesson to give the children a little extra time to work with the target vocabulary. Lesson 4 introduces a TPR (Total Physical Response) action story to the children, which uses the target vocabulary in short phrases. During the Pencil and Paper section of the lesson, the children are encouraged to put the pictures of the action story in the correct order. Lesson 5 introduces the children to a story in English using the Story cards and the audio CD. Each story reuses the target vocabulary of the unit in a fun way which demonstrates an important life value, such as friendship or sharing. The worksheet activity uses one scene from the story. Lesson 6 completes the unit by using a variety of games to practise the vocabulary from the current and previous units. In addition, during the Pencil and Paper section of the lesson, the worksheet focuses on Thinking Skills, such as focusing attention, recognising items which are the same, or sequencing. Optional Extra Lesson 1 gives the children chance to repeat the action story and, if they are confident with the order, you can mix up the order of the actions. Optional Extra Lesson 2 gives the children a second chance to listen to the story from the unit, and the opportunity to sing the song from the story. The Pencil and Paper activities in the optional extra lessons are craft based and encourage the children to make items to display in the classroom or to take home and share with their family. Lesson structure Each lesson is split into three or four sections of about ten minutes each (although the length of some activities will depend on the number of children in your class). An overall lesson should last between 30-35 minutes. For longer lessons, there is an If there is time activity described at the end of each lesson in the Teacher's Book which you may wish to use. Alternatively, any games and activities which the children have enjoyed from previous lessons can be repeated.
  7. 7. Lessons start with a Warm-up section. Children sing the Hello song and the Circle song, greet the Peter the panda hand puppet and the rest of the class. This is followed by Carpet Time. During Carpet Time, the children are introduced to new vocabulary, stories and songs as well as playing a variety of games. (It is not necessary for Carpet Time to be done on a carpet, any space where the children can sit together in a circle or semi-circle on the floor can be used.) The Table song is used to help move the children from the floor to the tables and for the Pencil and Paper section of the lesson. During this part of the lesson, the children practise vocabulary and songs while completing worksheets or art and craft activities. (There is no Pencil and Paper activity in Lessons 1 and 3 to give the children a little extra time to work with the new vocabulary.) Each lesson ends with a Rounding Off section which includes the Bye-bye song. ACTIVITIES Each unit contains the following activities: • Songs • Action Stories • Stories • Thinking Skills In order for the children to retain their knowledge of a foreign language, they need to enjoy it and to feel inspired. Knowledge is more firmly fixed in children's memories when it appeals to them. Most information that reaches our brains via various senses is quickly forgotten. The information which is retained is normally information which is most relevant to us. Thus, using stories and songs which children can relate to is a good way to inspire and motivate their interest. The activities in Hoorayl Starter are designed to be compatible with the interests of 3-year-old children and to facilitate their learning. They involve as many of the children's senses as possible so they are engaged at a variety of levels in learning and producing the language. Songs Children generally enjoy songs at kindergarten age. Singing in groups is fun and children learn many songs during the course. The songs in the course have been written specially for each unit. They revise the language presented so teachers can easily see how much of the language students are able to produce and understand. The first time the children listen to a new song, sing along and use gestures or mimes. The children will then gradually join in with you, over a period of time. Once the children seem confident singing a song, don't be afraid to use the karaoke version. You can also adapt some of the songs by changing the words, the order of the verses, and, if appropriate, using the children's names in the song. Action Stories James Asher1 created a method of language teaching based on Total Physical Response (TPR) where teachers are encouraged to teach children to understand and use language using all their senses. Action stories use actions, gestures and mime. This total engagement of the children in the story makes learning an active rather than a passive experience and allows them to retain and experience the language more profoundly. It also encourages them to develop good listening skills. Children hear a phrase then act it out by copying the teacher, thus linking comprehension directly to action and, in so doing, fixing the information firmly in their brains. Action stories use all senses and benefit children's learning process in a number of ways: • Acting out stories allows children to develop skills in following instructions and working with other people. As language and action are closely linked, meaning is learned directly through action. • Acting out stories is fun. Children can relax and enjoy the experience. Also, the group provides security, particularly for those children who take longer to speak. In this case, they can use other children in the group as models for the appropriate language to use. • From the beginning, children learn that they can achieve something in English. This increases their confidence in learning a foreign language. • Development of listening skills is important. However, at this level, children concentrate more on developing their vocabulary and their awareness of the language in general. Listening is concentrated on more specifically in the next level of the course. Action stories allow children to listen to the teacher and thus gain confidence in pronunciation and intonation of key words. The learning goal is achieved when children can act out an action story independently after practising it. They do not need to be able to recite the story or even to be able to reconstruct it freely - it is good enough that they can act it. We suggest that you keep the action story mimes and gestures different from the mimes and gestures used when introducing the vocabulary. One way to do this is to always do the mimes and gestures for the action story standing up, and to do the vocabulary mimes and gestures sitting down in a circle or semi-circle. 1 Asher, J. (1988), Learning Another Language Through Actions: The Complete Teacher's Guide Book, Los Gatos, Ca.: Sky Oaks Publications. Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages e
  8. 8. Stories It is well known that stories make an essential contribution to the cultural, social and emotional development of a child: The story is a cultural universal; everyone everywhere enjoys stories. The story, then, is not just some casual entertainment; it reflects a basic and powerful form in which we make sense of the world and experience. 2 In the foreign-language classroom, children learn to understand sequences of events via stories. They enjoy good, motivating stories and usually remember them well if they are presented appropriately and interestingly. They can also be used to develop children's enjoyment and appreciation of theatre. Teachers use the Story cards w ith the audio CD or tell the story themselves. (The script is on the back of the cards.) Students can use the character cut-outs from Worksheet 6a+b (Unit 1, Extra Lesson 1) to act out the scenes (See p. 11 for details) In addition, each story has its own cut-out mini storybook for students to colour. (For detailed description of how to work with the mini storybook see p. 11.) The stories in the course are also used to teach children moral values such as helping each other and the importance of friendship . Thinking Skills The Pencil and Paper activity in Lesson 6 of each main unit focuses on Thinking Skills, such as focusing attention, recognising similarities and differences and continuing sequences. These Thinking Skills activities aim to cognitively engage the children in the task as well as develop and improve the skills they will need before and after kindergarten. SOME TEACHING TIPS Working with the flashcards Flashcards visually introduce key words and are an indispensable part of most pre-school courses. Here are some teachings tips as to how to use the flashcards in your lessons. • Remember that when trying to convey the meaning of a new word to children, the word should be shown first, so use the flashcards at the beginning of every lesson to introduce the new vocabulary. • Make sure that children always hear the word a number of times before you start to use it w ithin the lesson. Children need to hear and really understand the pronunciation and intonation of the 2 Egan. K. (1986). Teaching as Story Telling. Chicago. University of Chicago Press. p. 2. e Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages word a number of times. Use the CD, your voice, the songs and any other listening devices to really anchor the word in the child's memory. • Get active! Use the children's bodies, ears, and eyes to reinforce the new words and language they are learning. Pictures, pronunciation and motor- processing techniques used together all help the children retain the word and its meaning in an active way. • Repeat the new words using the flashcards. Keep repeating until you feel the children have absorbed the meaning and relevance of a word. You can use different voices to keep their interest as we suggest within the Teacher's Book notes. Below are some games using flash cards we have suggested based on the principles outlined above. Vocabulary games using memory Point to... • Put the flashcards on the floor in front of the children with the picture facing up. • Point to each of the cards and elicit the correct word for each picture. • Say Point to... and name one of the flashcards. Then encourage the children to point to the correct flashcard . • You could also say Touch the... and let the children touch the flashcard you have named. • If the children are likely to hit instead of gently touch the cards, roll some sheets of paper into batons and let the children touch the flashcards with the paper batons. You could also give the paper batons to half the children, and after they have touched a flashcard, all children pass their baton to a child without a baton so everyone gets a turn. Where's the...? • Show the children each of the flashcards and elicit the correct word as you place each card face down on the floor. • Mix up the cards by sliding them around the floor. • Make Peter ask the children for one of the flashcards. • Allow the children to take it in turns to try turning over a card to find the flashcard Peter wants. Yes or no game • Show the children the flashcards and elicit the words. Then show the children that you are mixing the cards in your hands so neither you nor the children know the order of the cards. • Take one of the flashcards and hold it above your head so that the children can see which flashcard you are holding but you can't.
  9. 9. • With your free hand, point to the flashcard and name one of the possible flashcard items. Encourage the children to say Yes. if you guessed correctly and No, sorry. if not. • If the answer was No, sorry., keep guessing until the children say Yes. • Repeat this with some of the other flashcards. Hold it up • Give the flashcards out to some of the children. • Say Hold up (green). and encourage the child holding the appropriate flashcard to hold it in the air. • Repeat a couple of times using different words and then change the children holding the flashcards so different children get a chance to play. Vocabulary games for speaking Uncover the card • Cover a flashcard with a piece of card (or another flashcard). • Gradually move the piece of card up/down or across the flashcard to show some of the picture on the card. • Encourage the children to guess which flashcard is hidden as it is being revealed. Flash the flashcard • Show the children the flashcards and elicit the correct words. • Show the children that you are mixing the flashcards in your hands so neither you nor the children know the order of the cards. • Hold the flash cards so you can see the first card but the children can't. Quickly rotate or fan the cards so the children get a quick look at the first flashcard and say What is it? • Encourage the children to name the flashcard they think they can see. • Gradually reduce the speed that you rotate or fan the flashcard until the children can correctly name the card. What's missing? • Elicit the vocabulary for the flashcards you are using and then put all the cards on the floor face down so the picture can't be seen. • Mix the cards up and then turn them over one at a time. Elicit the name of the picture on the card until only one card remains face down. • Encourage the children to name the card which is missing (and is face down). Ask What's missing?, then turn the card over to check if the children were correct. • If the children are interested, play the game again and leave a different card face down. Find the flashcard • Choose a confident child from the class and ask him or her to choose a flashcard then stand near you. Ask this child to close his or her eyes and give him or her Peter to hold. • Tell the other children to be quiet and show them that you are hiding the flashcard, for example under a cushion, in a toy box, on the bookcase, etc. • Ask the child who is holding Peter to open his or her eyes and ask the child where he or she thinks the flashcard is. • Make it clear to the other children that they are not to say where the flashcard is hidden. • Encourage the child holding Peter to walk around the classroom to find the hidden flashcard. Keep saying the name of the picture on the flashcard as the child moves around. • As the child gets closer to the flashcard, say the word from the flashcard more loudly and show that they are correct (for example, nod your head). As the child gets further away, say it more quietly and show that they are wrong (for example, shake your head). • Once the child has found the card, the child should return to the circle with Peter and the flashcard and another child can hold Peter. Flashcard list Hello My body 1 Peter the panda 22 hands 2 Rosie the rabbit 23 teeth 3 red 24 eyes 4 blue 25 nose 5 one 26 mouth 6 two 27 robot 7 three 8 butterfly My clothes 28 T-shirt My toys 29 trousers/pants (AmE) 9 teddy/teddy bear 30 shoes (AmE) 31 skirt 10 doll 11 plane Food 12 train 32 pizza 13 yellow 33 salad 14 old toys 34 soup 15 new toys 35 milk 36 spaghetti Animals 16 dog Christmas 17 cat 37 Christmas tree 18 cow 38 present 19 spider 20 green Extra Unit Easter 21 four 39 Easter bunny 40 Easter eggs Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Cl»
  10. 10. Working with the mini flashcards Note: To make the mini flashcards last longer, you could print them onto card or thick paper before the children colour them, or you could laminate the cards after the children have coloured them , On the Teacher's DVD-ROM there are sets of mini flashcards for each main unit of Hooray! Starter, If you have extra time available, the children can colour and make the mini flashcards during the lesson, or you can colour and make them yourself. The mini flashcards can be used to play some of the games in the lessons, for example Bingo!, Snap! and Musical chairs, or, if parents want to use them with their children, extra copies could be made to take home. Bingo! • Put the teacher's flashcards face down on the floor in front of Peter (everyone must be using the same vocabulary set). • Help the children to move so that they have a space in front of them, Help them to choose some of their mini flashcards and put them on the floor with the picture facing up. • Make Peter turn over one of the flashcards from his set, and show and name the flashcard for the children, Then encourage the children to turn over the mini flashcard with the same picture so the picture can't be seen. • Repeat this until some of the children have turned over all of their mini flashcards and encourage them to shout Bingo! Peter can then kiss, hug or high-five with the children who have 'Bingo', • If the children are still interested, then turn all the cards back over and repeat the activity, this time calling the names of the flashcards a little quicker, Snap! • Help the children to move so that they have a space in front of them, Help them to choose some of their mini flashcards and put them on the floor with the picture facing up. • Hold the teacher's flashcards in a fan. Make Peter select one of the cards and hold it so the children can't see which card has been chosen. • Encourage the children to choose one of their mini flashcards and hold it up in the air so you can see which card they have selected, • Make Peter show the card which he selected and name the card for the children. • Make Peter hug, kiss or high-five the children who are holding up the same card and say Snap! • Put all the cards back to the starting position and repeat the activity with Peter and the children selecting a different flashcard, e Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Musical chairs • Put chairs, cushions or laminated mini flashcards in a place where the children can easily walk around (and sit on) them. If you are using chairs or cushions, a mini flashcard should be clearly attached to each chair or cushion, • Play some music for the children to move around to, • Stop the music and say Sit down. and encourage the children to sit down on the nearest seat that is available. • Randomly select one of the teacher's flashcards and name the picture on the flashcard. • All the children sitting on a chair with that mini flashcard are 'out'. Ask these children to stand near you for the next round and then allow them to join back in the game the round after. • Play the music again and allow the remaining children to move around the chairs and repeat the activity, If you are keeping the children's mini flashcards in the classroom, you could put them in envelopes or boxes with the children's name so they are easy to find . Working with the hand puppet The Peter the panda hand puppet performs a variety of functions in the classroom . It can be used to help classroom management by: • demonstrating activities to the children • quietening the class down • choosing children to take part in activities • comforting children who are upset by giving them a hug or a kiss Peter can also help with using and practising English by: • making mistakes for the children to correct • modelling language for the children to copy or repeat • getting embarrassed and asking the chi ldren to help him with their English • giving more opportunities for using English for example saying Hello. and Bye-bye., waking Peter up, or guessing flashcards that Peter is thinking of The following methodology tips make the use of Peter particularly effective in the lesson: • Use a distinctive voice for Peter by changing your voice slightly. You can also copy the voice of Peter in the stories. This helps to give Peter his own identity in the children's perception, i.e. it makes him seem as real as possible. • Only make Peter look like he is speaking when he is speaking. When you are speaking as yourself Peter should not move, This is an important aid to comprehension for the children.
  11. 11. • When children speak to Peter in their first language (L1) he repeats the request in English or doesn't understand them. Peter should never be used in an L1 lesson because he serves as an important psychological anchor for foreign language use. Working with the Student's Book The Student's Book is used during the Pencil and Paper section. In order for you to use the worksheets in the Student's Book effectively we suggest the following: • If possible, keep the Student's Books in the classroom, or in the kindergarten. This prevents the children from colouring them at home and ensures that you always have the sheets you need for the lesson. • Only hand out the Student's Book when it is needed during the Pencil and Paper section of the lesson. Alternatively, you can tear out the appropriate page and give this to the children. • At the end of the Pencil and Paper section, all worksheets should be collected. These can then be stored in a folder for the children or displayed on the walls in the classroom. • Parents can be invited to look at their child's book or folder at the end of the lessons, or you can send the worksheets for a unit home at the end of the unit Working with the Story cards The Story cards are used to tell the story with the audio CD. While showing the children the Story cards you can either play the story from the audio CD or you can read the script for the story from the back of each card. In order for you to use the Story cards effectively we suggest the following: • Check the order of the Story cards before the lesson, to make sure they are in the correct order. • Only show the children one Story card at a time while you are telling the story and point to characters and items in the picture while the children listen to the story. • You might find it easiest to have the cards in a pile with the pictures face down and the first card on the top of the pile. In this way, you can pick up the top card from the pile to show the children and you can see the script on the back of the card. • If you are reading the script on the back of the Story cards, try to use a different voice for each character so the children know which character is talking. On the Teacher's DVD-ROM there are character cut-outs that can be used to play the characters or act out parts of the stories (Worksheet 6a+b). Working with the mini storybooks On the Teacher's DVD-ROM, there are worksheets for mini storybooks for each story presented in Hooray! Starter. If there is time, children get to choose and colour one picture from the story during the Pencil and Paper section of Lesson 5. The children can then take their storybook home and look at the story with their parents, or even describe the events from the story using their first language. How to make the mini storybook 1) Print the two worksheets onto one A4 page (front and back). Or print the two sheets separately and stick them together. 2) Cut around the story on the worksheets. 3) Fold the sheet in half horizontally. 4) Fold the sheet in half vertically. 5) Staple or use sticky tape tv ® along the fold on the left hand side of the book to fix it 6) Cut along the fold at the top. Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages _
  12. 12. HOW YOUNG LEARNERS LEARN Methodology Children of this age are already in the process of learning their first language (L1) so they are already equipped with basic skills to learn a second language. Second language learning allows them to use these skills as well as developing others. Understanding without words Before young learners start to use words, they decode meaning from intonation, mime, gesture and overall context. This is of great value when learning a foreign language as these skills can be applied to the new language and children can begin to understand using a process they are already familiar with. This develops confidence and a sense of achievement. Using limited words Young learners are encouraged to express themselves as much as they can within their second language, however, as their grasp of the language is limited, they will often resort to playing and/or creating new words within it, or transferring what they have learnt from other contexts. They may, for example, use words from their native language but say them with an English accent. These sorts of strategies give the teacher an important insight into how the child is progressing with second language acquisition. Learning indirectly At this age, grammar, punctuation or other structural aspects of language are not key to the learning process. Children of this age love stories, the sound of new words and songs that they can sing along to and do the actions to. They like games where they are challenged to think and guess and, in so doing, use structures they have learnt. They also enjoy copying movements from a story or imitating the voices of the characters. The way they pronounce a word is often almost identical to the model they have heard on the CD. By doing this, children are learning new skills and experiencing language as a means of communicating. Interacting and speaking Most young learners have a natural need to communicate. Using this as a starting point, both teachers and parents can help, improve and stimulate their child in the second language by interacting as much as possible in it and helping them to read, listen and talk when appropriate. Sometimes you may just want them to listen rather than communicate so the teacher needs to establish a good balance of speaking and listening within the classroom . e Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Holistic language learning We use language to understand others and to make ourselves understood. Most adult learners want to understand how a second language works and what rules it follows, for example, how verbs are formed and used. They use this cognitive knowledge to learn systematically. Children, however, learn in a much more holistic way. Listening comprehension is a fundamental part of this process. Learners speculate about what they hear and are helped in their comprehension by mime, gesture and visual prompts like photos and pictures. Likewise, young learners will gradually start to understand the instruction 'Stand up!' because the teacher actually stands up each time the phrase is used. By doing this, the children interpret the meaning visually, they imitate and so learn its meaning and sound through action and repetition . This repetition allows the children to fix both meaning and sound into their long-term memory. For successful learning to take place, children also need to feel relaxed and at ease within the classroom. Positive feedback and praise are fundamental in encouraging them to experiment and push back the boundaries of the language in so far as they feel able. Patience is also necessary for when they have misunderstood or need more time to understand and absorb relevant language or words. Content is also of crucial importance and needs to be meaningful and interesting. Songs and stories encourage children to connect with the second language at a basic sensory level via movement and sound. Their ability to understand, for example, a story in the second language, is a good way to increase self-esteem and confidence in the second language and heightens their motivation to learn. Speaking skills are also important to develop. Songs allow children to practise pronunciation and intonation and repeat important words and expressions in fun ways that fix them in their memories. Stories help children memorise important expressions and improve their understanding of connections. Eventually, they are confident enough to act out simple utterances in communicative contexts.
  13. 13. THE SMILE APPROACH® While researching and writing for young learners, we have formalised a set of principles with a handy acronym to help ourselves and teachers appreciate the key basic principles for teaching in a systematic and clear way. Our approach is called The SMILE Approach® and you can find a breakdown of its main points below with how they affect and inform our writing and your teaching. S M L E Skill-oriented learning The development of second language skills does not take place independently of general cognitive development. When children try to understand the meaning of a sentence, they draw on skills that they also use for solving problems, establishing relationships, drawing conclusions etc. Because of this, it makes sense to integrate second language learning into the curriculum as early as possible. As we have said, children of this age learn holistically so integrating second language learning into the curriculum encourages the development not only of the child's general intellectual skills but also of his or her linguistic ones. S M I L E 4Multi-sensory learner motivation You need only watch children playing to understand how important learning through the senses is at this age. Hooray! Let's play! aims to involve as many senses as possible during the language-learning process. This is based on the following principles: • When pupils learn, they do so through their senses: they learn what they see, hear and do. • Our 'hearing' sense is located on the so-called left side of the brain. Processing information kinaesthetically - by concrete activity - is closely connected to the right side of the brain. The visual reception of information can be controlled by either the left or the right side of the brain. • The better the senses are integrated at the presentation of information stage, the better children will receive the information (multisensory reception). • Receiving and processing information activates the visual, auditory and kinaesthetic neurological systems. During the processes of thinking and remembering, the brain's multisensory activation heightens students' ability to pay attention, concentrate and store linguistic information in their long-term memory. • The fact that most children have different learning styles and a preference for one sensory channel over another (and therefore weaknesses in one or two of the other sensory channels) underlines the importance of a teaching methodology that takes into account the differing needs of different learners and one which strikes a balance between visual, auditory and kinaesthetic presentation, processing and practice. • Children love stories. When presented in an appropriate multi-sensory way, these stories remain in the memory. Words, parts of sentences and sentences can thus be fixed in the long-term memory. S M L E 4Intelligence-building activities 'Intelligence' is a term that covers a range of different human abilities all independent of one another. Researchers into intelligence speak of a multiplicity of 'intelligences' . Howard Gardner claims that there are seven different areas of intelligence, i.e. 'multiple intelligences' 3 Modern research into intelligence indicates that intelligence is not totally dependent on what we are born with . Intelligence is also quite clearly influenced by how we learn. Simply put, intelligence can be learned. Learning a second language early on develops and stimulates a child's intelligence in a number of ways. All the intelligences outlined by Howard Gardner are brought into play and used by the SMILE approach: Area of Activation in Hooray! Let's intelligence play! by: Linguistic Promoting the enjoyment of intelligence playing with language. Offering materials for learning vocabulary and phrases. Musical Developing the skill of intelligence differentiating tunes and rhythm through songs. Interpersonal Developing basic social skills as intelligence an intrinsic principle: learning to listen to each other, tolerance of language errors, patience, etc. 3 Gardner, H. (1983), Frames of Mind' The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Basic Books. Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages e
  14. 14. Introduction Area of Activation in Hooray! Let's intelligence play! by: Kinaesthetic Using the body when doing intelligence action stories, songs and action games. Developing fine motor skills through various types of activities: stickers, drawing, colouring and craftwork. Visuospatial Improving visuospatial intelligence perception through picture searches (discovery pictures). Developing the visual memory through picture puzzles. Mathematical- Improving mathematical-logical logical intelligence Intrapersonal intelligence 5 M intelligence through exercises where students sort and match. Encouraging logical perception through sequences and activities requiring putting things in order. Developing the ability to reflect as a basis for one's own speaking. L E 4Long-term memory storage through music, movement, rhythm and rhyme Many adults can remember and retell the rhymes and songs they learned in childhood easily and rhythmically. Often the reason is because they have been learnt using actions and movement. The ability to grasp and retell a story using the rhythmic structuring of the words is an indication of the level of language development of a child. The main function of this rhythmic differentiation ability is that it combines perception and understanding and so is important for remembering words, writing and recognising sentence patterns. 5 M L E 4Exciting stories and games When children identify with what has been learned, they remember it. They remember phrases, parts of sentences and often whole sentences (so-called chunks of language). Good foreign-language learners can repeatedly transfer such chunks of language to other contexts and so practise and consolidate the foreign language through play. e Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages HOW TO MANAGE YOUR CLASS Children of this age group have naturally got a short attention span, are restless and get excited very easily. We believe that it is better to try and divert their energy towards activities rather than try to control it or ask them to be silent or still. What does the teacher do? The English teacher has a number of different tasks: • managing and focusing the attention of the learners • giving linguistic input with the aid of interactive materials and checking this has been understood • establishing a routine in the classroom • encouraging the children to speak in the foreign language • using the first language in small amounts • managing the seating in the classroom to suit the activity. Managing and focusing attention Some tools you can use to manage their attention and focus their attention during the lesson are: • Get the children used to hearing you speaking in English. • Follow a similar pattern of activities each lesson and mark changes in the lesson using the routines. • Use the Calm down song when the children are becoming too energetic as a signal that everyone needs to calm down (See p. 17). • Plan for quiet periods in your lessons, for example Pencil and Paper time, to give the children the chance to work independently and for you to give attention to individuals. • Alternate between activities with lots of movement and very little movement. Movement and making noise tends to excite children of this age. If you allow too much movement and noise, a class of kindergarten children can quickly get overexcited and difficult to control. By following a loud or energetic activity with a quieter activity, you can calm the children down a little and stop them from becoming too excited. • Be flexible, occasionally it is better to go with distractions and interruptions and try to use them in the lesson rather than trying to make the children ignore them. -
  15. 15. Checking understanding We can't understand everything that we hear in a foreign language. We often work out the meaning from the context. A good teacher will try to help children understand as much as possible by using the children's sensory channels (auditory, visual and motor). In order to check comprehension, many teachers use the following methods which are slightly counter- productive: • Repeatedly translating individual words. This makes children feel that they can only understand when they know every single word. This is not necessary as when you teach action stories, you teach the whole phrase rather than individual words. Translating each word hinders comprehenshion . There are some circumstances where the teacher may need to use the child's L1 to explain a phrase. If, for example, a child displays aggressive or frustrated behaviour because they can't understand, it would benefit the child to give the L1 equivalent as well as showing the required action again. • Asking the question Do you understand? is often not helpful. Children will say Yes. rather than explaining. It is better to watch how the children behave. This will enable you to determine if you need to help them with their comprehension or not. • Teachers often give an instruction in English then translate it straight into the students' native language. This may make children lazy as they realise that each instruction is also given in their first language so they stop listening. It is better for the teacher to speak in short sentences, give the children time to think, then repeat the instructions slowly using mimes, gestures, pictures or demonstrations if necessary. Teacher talk and classroom language Teaching in kindergarten is mainly about commu- nication. It is required, therefore, that the children understand their teacher when performing activities in English . That is why vocabulary is acquired in a playful way at the beginning of every unit and should be reinforced with facial expressions, gesture, intonation and visual aids such as the Story cards and flashcards. The children can thus tryout important strategies for successful contact with the foreign language. It is important to expose the children to as much English as possible during their English lessons. Research indicates that children of this age can acquire a foreign language and good levels of pronunciation by a natural exposure to the foreign language. However, for this to be successful the children need as much exposure to the foreign language as possible. Therefore, we recommend that you try to speak as much English as possible during the lesson, and try to conduct the lesson as much as possible in only English. It is especially important that classroom language, the everyday instructions and directions that you use to keep the children on task and focused is in English as this w ill give the children the most natural exposure to English. The teacher can assume that the children are able to decode new language when it is presented with gestures and visual clues. Therefore, from a very early stage of the foreign language lesson, simple instructions such as Sit down. and Colour the plane blue. can be given only in English. Using L1 might be helpful when something needs to be explained quickly in order to not disturb the continuity of an activity or when you want to give some pre-information for the activities. However, avoid using translations unless they are necessary. Essential classroom language is clearly indicated in the lesson notes throughout the course and some useful examples of classroom language are listed below. Questions Where's the.. .? What's this? What are these? Who's this? How many .. ? What c%ur? Praise Well done! Very good! Great! Excellent! Yes, that's right! Activity instructions Point to... Show me... Look! Listen. Touch. Let's sing. Pencil and Paper instructions C%ur .. Draw .. Find. .. How many ..? Count. .. Stick in.. . Cut out.. . Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages e
  16. 16. Using English names within the classroom Many teachers give their students English names when working in the classroom. Two reasons given for this are: • children like to assume the identity of someone else • when the teacher says, for example, Greta, sit down please. most of the sentence is in English, the child's name isn't, so it makes sense to change it too. We think it is better to retain the child's own name in the classroom for the following reasons: • The children - and sometimes the teacher - keep forgetting the English names of their classmates. This leads to confusion about who is meant to be following the instructions that are given. • If children are communicating in the foreign language, this means that they are stating their own feelings, state of health, preferences, etc. If they are using a different name, they are using this as their identity. For example, if the teacher asks Ben (who is actually called Martin) to name his favourite colour, Ben talks about Ben. Martin's identity is not present. • If Martin meets another child in the holidays and this child can only communicate in English, if he is asked his name, he will answer Ben and not Martin. How to arrange seating in the classroom Although it is unrealistic to expect the tables in the classroom to be moved for short periods of teaching, the following points should be considered: • It is easiest to focus and keep children's attention when they can see you clearly and you can see each of them. For this reason, most games and activities should be played with the children sat on chairs or on the floor in a circle or semi-circle. • When doing Pencil and Paper activities, the children should be sat on chairs at a table, but the chairs and tables should be arranged in such a way that the children have enough room in their places to be able to move. • All children should have a clear view of you and any materials you are showing or demonstrating at any stage of the lesson. e Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Tips for teaching very young learners This most important tip we can give for teaching very young learners is be flexible and enjoy it! The lesson plans provided in the Teacher's Book are guidelines only. You know your class and can make the best decisions about what will work for you and your class in your English classroom area. Don't be afraid to try new games and activities in your classroom, but constantly listen, watch and react to the children in your class during everything you do. Some suggestions to help you teach your young learners successfully: • Encourage the children to join in with the actions for the stories and songs. Children will learn the actions quickly and this can give them the confidence to join in with the English lessons even though they might not feel confident enough to speak. Actions can also prompt the children and help them remember words and phrases they have produced in previous lessons. • Plan for all activities to be short but allow activities and games to be repeated as long as the children are happy to continue doing them. • Remember to reuse games and activities the children particularly enjoyed in later lessons. • If the children don't react well to an activity, just stop and move on to something new. Try it again later in another lesson perhaps with different vocabulary or a different topic. • Be aware of the children's energy levels depending on the time of the day/the day of the week/the weather. Try to structure your lesson to allow for this. If they arrive at the lesson excited, you can start with a quiet activity to calm them down, or if they have low energy you can do something energetic to wake them up. • Don't think that you have to do all the activities in the Teacher's Book. Choose the activities that you think your children will react best to. • Experiment with the materials and let the children guide you in adapting the games and activities. • Listen to the children and make them feel that you value their opinions. • Allow the children to produce English words or phrases at their own speed. Some children take longer than others but most will want to produce when they are having fun and feel confident enough. • Encourage the children's natural enjoyment of songs, stories and characters and build on this enjoyment in your lessons. • Have fun and enjoy the lessons yourself. Children can tell when you are having fun and will want to have fun with you .
  17. 17. OVERVIEW OF ROUTINES Children of this age group work better w ithin a clear structure where they know what to expect and what is expected of them . Therefore, it is important to set up clear routines and indicators at the start of the course for the children to follow through all of their English lessons. In Hooray! Starter each stage of the lesson can be introduced using a song which is on the audio CD. The children are not expected to learn these songs themselves, but you might find that they join in singing them as the course progresses. Hello routine This marks the start of each lesson for the children. Use the Peter the panda hand puppet to greet the children and encourage them to wave and say hello back. Hello song Hello, hello, It's nice to see you. Hello, hello, It's nice to see you. Bye-bye routine This marks the end of each lesson for the children. The Peter hand puppet should say bye-bye to each child as they leave the English lesson. Bye-bye song Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye! Transition routines These are to help the transition from one area of the classroom to another in a calm and organised manner. Encourage the children to join hands during the song and then lead them in a snake to the new area of the classroom. Circle song Come with me, Come with me, Make a circle. Come with me, Come with me, One, two, three. Table song Come with me, Come with me, Sit at a table, One, two, three. Story routine This tells the children that the next activity is listening to a story. As you sing the song, make appropriate actions and encourage the children to sit down quietly ready to listen. Story song It's time for a story <mime opening a book> Listen and look. <hold hand to ear and point to your eye> It's time for a story <mime opening a book> Listen and look. <hold hand to ear and point to your eye> Tidying up routine/Cleaning up routine (AmE) This marks the end of a Pencil and Paper activity and can be used to encourage the children to help you tidy up before you move on to the next activity. Sing the Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmEJ and start to tidy up while encouraging the children to help you. Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmE) Let's help each other And tidy up / clean up (AmEJ. Let's help each other And tidy up / clean up (AmEJ. Calm down routine This can be used any time the children get overexcited and need to be calmed down. As you sing the song get quieter, put your fingers on your lips and encourage the children to sit down quietly with you. You might need to sing the song more than once to get the class to calm down completely. Calm down song Let's be quiet, Let's calm down. Let's be quiet, Let's calm down. HOW PARENTS CAN HELP Parents of young children generally have a positive attitude towards learning a foreign language and will want to actively support their children's development. You should encourage this involvement by keeping the parents fully informed about what is happening in the language lessons. If appropriate, you could also invite parents to visit their child's lesson to watch them perform the action stories. If parents have time and are willing to try and speak in English, they could even help out with some of the art and craft activities. The Teacher's DVD-ROM includes letters that you can edit and send home to the parents at the beginning or at the end of each unit. These not only inform the parents about the topic and materials their children will be covering or have covered in class, but also include the lyrics for the songs in each unit and some information about how children learn a foreign language. Hoorayl STARTER © Helbling Languages e
  18. 18. If parents want to speak to you about their child's learning, it is recommended that the following points are made: • You want the child's early experiences of learning a foreign language to be positive ones so they gain confidence and lose their shyness about expressing themselves in a foreign language. • Parents should not expect their children to speak at the beginning. Children need to learn to understand first and then respond using simple language. • Using Hoorayl Starter will develop a variety of the children's skills - intellectual, social, emotional and motor. • Learning a foreign language at an early age encourages an open-minded attitude towards other cultures. • It is very important to praise children for their progress in learning. • If children want to show you what they can do, show interest. Errors are a sign of progress in learning. e Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages • Parents should encourage their children to learn the foreign language holistically and not translate it. They may be able to understand the meaning of the sentences and phrases but not understand them in their first language. This is okay. It is better not to translate. • Parents should not be disappointed if their child cannot say something that they have learned. • Parents can help their children to learn English with Hooray! Starter in the following ways: - Songs can be listened to and revised using the Songs Audio CD in the Student's Book. - Parents can play 'at school' with their children taking the role of the pupil. Children take great pleasure in teaching their parents a foreign language. - Parents can look at the worksheets and art and craft objects with the children and talk to them in their first language about what they did.
  19. 19. LANGUAGE OVERVIEW • UNIT 1 Key Words Peter Rosie red blue one two three butterfly Receptive language It's nice to see you . Look, it's Peter/Rosie. Is it Peter or Rosie? Where are you, Peter? It's time to go. How are you? I'm fine. Sit in a circle. Clap your hands. Hello, Peter/Rosie. Look. It's red and blue. Wonderful. One, two, three. Dear Rosie, it's for you . Thank you. Bye-bye, Peter/Rosie. Red or blue? WhatlWho is it? What colour is it? Classroom language Hello! / Bye-bye! Look. Freeze! Close/Open your eyes. Point to (Peter). Colour them blue. Listen. Hold up (two). Stand up / Sit down, everyone. Where's (one)? Look, it's a butterfly. Trace/Draw the line. Stick in the butterfly. Cut out (Peter). What's missing? Objectives Children learn: • to identify the two characters from Hooray! Starter • to count to three in English • to recognise and name the colours red and blue in English • to say hello and bye-bye in English • to follow some simple instructions and lesson routines in English Competences Children can: • recognise the characters from Hooray! Starter • act out a three part action story • join in with a song • show interest in a story read by the teacher or played on a CD • show their understanding using gestures and mimes, as well as through participation in the games and activities Values • to develop appreciation for the value of friendship Thinking Skills • focusing on details and matching a coloured picture to the appropriate silhouette Hooray! STARTER© Helbling Languages e
  20. 20. Unit 1 LESSON 1 • NEW CHARACTERS Main Objective To introduce the characters from Hooray! Starter Key Words Peter, Rosie Receptive language It's nice to see you . Look, it's Peter/Rosie. Is it Peter or Rosie? Where are you, Peter? It's time to go. Classroom language Hello ! I Bye-bye! Look. Freeze! Activities Introduce Peter and Rosie. Play Peter or Rosie? and Where are you, Peter? Materials Checklist o Peter hand puppet o CD 2, 8 (routine songs) o flashcards 1-2 (Peter, Rosie) o If there is time: character mini flashcards (Worksheet 1) (optional) Notes e Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Warm-up 1. Welcome the children and make a circle. • Hold the Peter puppet on your hand and, as the children enter the classroom, say Hello! and make Peter say Hello! to each child. • Encourage the children to sit in a circle or a semi- circle with you. • When all the children are sitting, make Peter say Hello, I'm Peter. • Then make Peter say Hello! to each child again using their name. • Allow each child to stroke, shake hands with or pat Peter. More confident children should be encouraged to say Hello! back. 2. Sing the Hello song. @: G", • Play the song and make Peter look like he is singing too. Hello song Hello, hello, It's nice to see you. Hello, hello, It's nice to see you. Carpet Time 3. Introduce Peter and Rosie. • Show the children the flashcard for Peter the panda and say Look, it's Peter. • Stand up and pretend to walk around in a small circle like a bear (big heavy steps) and encourage the children to join in and copy your movements. • When you want the children to stop moving say Freeze! and encourage the children to freeze with you . • Hold up the flashcard for Rosie the rabbit so all the children can see and say Look, it's Rosie. • Hop around in a small circle like a bunny rabbit and encourage the children to join in and copy your movements. • Repeat the activity until the children seem confident with copying your movements. 4. Play Peter or Rosie? • Take one of the flashcards (either Peter or Rosie) and, without showing the children the card, mime the action for the character. • Say Is it Peter or Rosie? and mime the action again. • Encourage the children to tell you which character you are miming . • You can ask more confident children to mime the character for the other children to guess.
  21. 21. g 'a :J It 5. Play Where are you, Peter? • Hold the Peter puppet on your hand and put it behind your back. • Look around the group of children, as if you are looking for Peter and say Where are you, Peter? • Pretend to search around the group a little, perhaps even look under children's legs. • Make Peter jump out from behind your back and make him say Here' am! Hello, everyone! • Repeat the activity and encourage the children to join in asking Where are you, Peter?and saying Hello, Peter. when they find him. Rounding Off 6. Say bye-bye to the children. • Look at Peter and say It's time to go, Peter. • Make Peter wave and say Bye-bye! to each child using their name. • Allow each child to stroke, shake hands with or pat Peter. More confident children should be encouraged to say Bye-bye! back to Peter. 7. Sing the Bye-bye song. ~ ij,,:, • Signal to the children that it is the end of the English lesson by singing or playing the Bye-bye song: Bye-bye song Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye! If there is time... Play the Peter and Rosie treasure hunt. 9m~$" Before the lesson, prepare several Preparation Tip! copies of the Peter and Rosie flashcards or mini flashcards and hide them around the classroom. If you have extra time available, the children can colour and make the mini flashcards during a lesson, or you can colour and make them yourself. Make sure it is possible for the children to find and reach the cards. If it is nice weather and you have a safe area to use outside, you might want to hide the flashcards outside for the children to find. • Tell the children which character they are looking for, for example say Can you find Rosie? • Encourage the children to search the classroom or the outside area and bring you any pictures of Rosie which they find. • When the children have found all the copies of Rosie, then ask them to look for Peter and bring you these pictures. • If there is time, you can encourage the children to close their eyes and hide the pictures for the children to find again. Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages _
  22. 22. Unit 1 LESSON 2 • SONG mmD Hello Main Objective To sing a song asking 'How are you?' Key Words Peter, Rosie red, blue Receptive Language It's nice to see you . Look, it's Peter/Rosie. How are you? I'm fine. It's time to go. Classroom Language Hello! / Bye-bye! Look. Freeze! Close/Open your eyes. Point to Peter/Rosie. Colour them blue. Activities Play Move like Peter and Rosie and Red or blue? Sing the How are you? song. Colour Peter's trousers/pants (AmE). Materials Checklist o Peter hand puppet o CD 2- 5, 8 (routine songs), CD 9 o flashcards 1-4 (Peter, Rosie, red, blue) o Student's Book, p. 3 o coloured pencils or crayons Notes fa Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Warm-up 1. Welcome the children and make a circle. • Hold Peter on your hand and, as the children enter the classroom, say Hello! and make Peter say Hello! to each child. • Encourage the children to sit in a circle or a semi- circle with you. • When all the children are sitting, make Peter say Hello, I'm Peter. • Then make Peter say Hello! to each child again using their name. • Allow each child to stroke, shake hands with or pat Peter. More confident children should be encouraged to say Hello! back to Peter. 2. Sing the Hello song. @: G,'I • Sing or play the Hello song and make Peter look like he is singing too. Hello song Hello, hello, It's nice to see you. Hello, hello, It's nice to see you. Carpet Time 3. Play Move like Peter and Rosie. • Show the children the flashcard for Peter and say Look, it's Peter. • Stand up and pretend to walk around in a small circle like a bear (big heavy steps) and encourage the children to join in and copy your movements. • When you want the children to stop moving say Freeze! and encourage them to freeze with you. • Hold up the flashcard for Rosie so all the children can see and say Look, it's Rosie. • Hop around in a small circle like a bunny rabbit and encourage the children to join in. • Repeat the activity until the children seem confident with moving like Peter and Rosie. 4. Play Red or blue? • Show the children the red flashcard and say Red. Then show the children the blue flashcard and say Blue. Repeat the words several times. • Say Close your eyes. and demonstrate by holding your hands over your eyes, then peek to check the children have copied you. • Once all the children have covered their eyes, put either the red or blue flashcard on the board or in the centre of the circle. • Say Open your eyes. and encourage the children to open their eyes. • Say Red or blue? and point to the flashcard on the board or in the centre of the circle. Encourage the children to name the card you are pointing to. • Repeat this a few times changing the flashcard until the children seem confident with naming the colours.
  23. 23. nt g 5. Sing the How are you? song. @Ii-l. • Attach the flashcards of Peter and Rosie to the board or put them in the centre of the circle where all the children can see them. • Play the How are you? song and encourage the children to wave or point to the correct character (the one that is being sung about) on the flashcards. How are you? Hello, Rosie. Hello, Rosie. Hello, how are you? Hello, how are you? I'm fine, I'm fine. I'm fine, I'm fine. Hello, Peter. Hello, Peter. Hello, how are you? Hello, how are you? I'm fine, I'm fine. I'm fine, I'm fine. Pencil and Paper 6. Sing the Table song. @G.,i • Say It's time to sit at the table. and indicate to the children that you would like them to go and sit down at the tables. • While the children are moving to the table, sing or play: Table song Come with me, Come with me. Sit at a table, One, two, three. (Repeat) 7. Colour Peter's trousers/pants (AmE). @D]@mI • Hold up the page so the children can see. Play the How are you? song again and point to Rosie and Peter on the page as you sing about them. • Give the children their Student's Books open to the correct page and hold up a copy so all the children can see clearly. • Point to Peter and say Look, it's Peter. , then point to Rosie and say Look, it's Rosie. • Say Point to Peter. and encourage the children to point to Peter. Then say Point to Rosie. and encourage the children to point to Rosie. • Point to Rosie's T-shirt and say It's red. • Point to Peter's trousers and say Colour them blue. and show the children a blue pencil or crayon. • If the children need help, show them the flashcard for Peter or the hand puppet and name the colour Blue. • Say Colour them blue. again and demonstrate by starting to colour Peter's trousers/pants (AmE) blue. • While the children are colouring, monitor the class and praise the children for neat colouring. You can also point to each of the characters on the page and ask the children Is it (Peter)? 8. Sing the Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmE). @G'li • If you would like the children to tidy away their crayons and other materials, say It's time to tidy up / clean up (AmE). • Start to collect the Student's Books and crayons and encourage the children to help you. • While you are picking things up, sing or play: Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmE) Let's help each other And tidy up / clean up (AmE). Let's help each other And tidy up / clean up (AmE). Rounding Off 9. Sing the Bye-bye song. @1i.1:. • While the children are still at the table, look at Peter and say It's time to go, Peter. • Make Peter wave and say Bye-bye! and encourage the children to wave and say Bye-bye! back to Peter. • Signal to the children that it is the end of the English lesson by singing or playing: Bye-bye song Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye! If there is time... Play Musical statues. • Show the children the flashcards for Peter and Rosie. • Ask the children to stand in the centre of the classroom or an area that the children can move around in. • Play some English music for the children to listen and dance to. • After a short time, stop the music and say Freeze. It's Peter. Hold up the flashcard for Peter and encourage the children to stop dancing and show you the action for Peter. • Play the music again and encourage the children to dance. • When you stop the music the second time, say Freeze. It's Rosie. and encourage the children to stop dancing and show you the action for Rosie. • While the children are interested, continue to play the music and when you stop the music, ask the children to freeze and do the action for the character on the flashcard. Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages e
  24. 24. nt g 5. Sing the How are you?song. @G,,'• Attach the flashcards of Peter and Rosie to the board or put them in the centre of the circle where all the children can see them. • Play the How are you? song and encourage the children to wave or point to the correct character (the one that is being sung about) on the flashcards. How are you? Hello, Rosie. Hello, Rosie. Hello, how are you '? Hello, how are you? I'm fine, I'm fine. I'm fine, I'm fine. Hello, Peter. Hello, Peter. Hello, how are you '? Hello, how are you? I'm fine, I'm fine. I'm fine, I'm fine. Pencil and Paper 6. Sing the Table song. @G'" • Say It's time to sit at the table. and indicate to the children that you would like them to go and sit down at the tables. • While the children are moving to the table, sing or play: Table song Come with me, Come with me. Sit at a table, One, two, three. (Repeat) 7. Colour Peter's trousers/pants (AmE). @DJ @ti'" • Hold up the page so the children can see. Play the How are you'? song again and point to Rosie and Peter on the page as you sing about them . • Give the children their Student's Books open to the correct page and hold up a copy so all the children can see clearly. • Point to Peter and say Look, it's Peter., then point to Rosie and say Look, it's Rosie. • Say Point to Peter. and encourage the children to point to Peter. Then say Point to Rosie. and encourage the children to point to Rosie. • Point to Rosie's T-shirt and say It's red. • Point to Peter's trousers and say Colour them blue. and show the children a blue pencil or crayon . • If the children need help, show them the flashcard for Peter or the hand puppet and name the colour Blue. • Say Colour them blue. again and demonstrate by starting to colour Peter's trousers/pants (AmE) blue. • While the children are colouring, monitor the class and praise the children for neat colouring. You can also point to each of the characters on the page and ask the children Is it (Peter)? 8. Sing the Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmE). @G'ii • If you would like the children to tidy away their crayons and other materials, say It's time to tidy up / clean up (AmE). • Start to collect the Student's Books and crayons and encourage the children to help you. • While you are picking things up, sing or play: Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmE) Let's help each other And tidy up / clean up (AmEJ. Let's help each other And tidy up / clean up (AmEJ. Rounding Off 9. Sing the Bye-bye song. @ti,):, • While the children are still at the table, look at Peter and say It's time to go, Peter. • Make Peter wave and say Bye-bye! and encourage the children to wave and say Bye-bye! back to Peter. • Signal to the children that it is the end of the English lesson by singing or playing: Bye-bye song Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye! If there is time... Play Musical statues. • Show the children the flashcards for Peter and Rosie. • Ask the children to stand in the centre of the classroom or an area that the children can move around in. • Play some English music for the children to listen and dance to. • After a short time, stop the music and say Freeze. It's Peter. Hold up the flashcard for Peter and encourage the children to stop dancing and show you the action for Peter. • Play the music again and encourage the children to dance. • When you stop the music the second time, say Freeze. It's Rosie. and encourage the children to stop dancing and show you the action for Rosie. • While the children are interested, continue to play the music and when you stop the music, ask the children to freeze and do the action for the character on the flashcard. Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages e
  25. 25. Unit 1 LESSON 3 • NUMBERS 1 TO 3 Main Objective To count to three. Key Words one, two, three Receptive Language It's nice to see you. Sit in a circle. How are you? I'm fine. It's time to go. Classroom Language Listen. Point to (one). Hold up (two). Activities Sing the How are you? song. Introduce the numbers one to three. Introduce the number flashcards. Play Point to... and Hold it up. Materials Checklist o Peter hand puppet o CD 3, 8 (routine songs), CD 9-10 o flashcards 5-7 (one, two, three) o If there is time: number mini flashcards (Worksheet 2) (optional) Notes Warm-up 1. Welcome the children and make a circle. ~G,U • Hold Peter on your hand and, as the children enter the classroom, say Hello! and make Peter say Hello! to each child. Encourage the more confident children to say Hello! back to Peter. • Ask the children to sit in a circle or semi-circle. Say Sit in a circle. and, while you move the children to the circle, encourage them to sit down as you sing or play: Circle song Come with me, Come with me, Make a circle. Come with me, Come with me, One, two, three. e Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages 2. Sing the How are you? song. ~ ti,,",'• Sing or play the How are you? song and encourage the children to join in waving to say hello as well as clapping. How are you? Hello, Rosie. Hello, Rosie. Hello, how are you? Hello, how are you? I'm fine, I'm fine. I'm fine, I'm fine. Hello, Peter ... • If there is time, repeat the song using the karaoke track or without music and say hello to each of the children in class, for example: How are you? Teacher: Hello, (Sophie). Children: Hello, (Sophie). Teacher: Hello, how are you? Children: Hello, how are you? All children and teacher: I'm fine, I'm fine. ... • You will probably need to sing the children's line as well. Encourage them to join in with you as much as possible. Carpet Time 3. Introduce the numbers one to three. • Hold up one finger, wiggle the finger in the air and say One. • Hold up two fingers so the children can see them, wiggle both fingers in the air and say Two. • Hold up three fingers so the children can see them, wiggle all three fingers and say Three. • Repeat counting to three and holding up the fingers in order, but this time encourage the children to join in and hold up the same number of fingers as you and wiggle them. • Repeat this and count a little quicker each time you do it. 4. Introduce the number flashcards. • Show the children the flashcard for number one, point to the spot on the dice and count One. You can also hold one finger in the air and wiggle it. • Show the children the flashcard for number two, count the spots by pointing at each spot in turn and saying One, two. • Repeat the same thing when you show the children the flashcard for number three. Point to the spots on the dice and count the spots for the children One, two, three.
  26. 26. 5. Play Point to... • Put the number flashcards on the floor in the centre of the circle and name each flashcard. • Say Point to one. and encourage the children to point to the flashcard for number one. • Praise the children who pointed at the correct flashcard and point to the flashcard for number one yourself. • Repeat saying a different number each time. 6. Play Hold it up. • Give the number flashcards out to three of the children. • Say Hold up one. and encourage the child holding the flashcard for number one to hold their flashcard in the air. • Repeat a couple of times using different numbers and then change the children holding the flashcards so different children get a chance to play. Rounding Off 7. Say bye-bye to the children. • Look at Peter and say It's time to go, Peter. • Make Peter wave and say Bye-bye! to each child using their name. • Allow each child to stroke, shake hands with or pat Peter and the more confident children should be encouraged to say Bye-bye! back to Peter. 8. Sing the Bye-bye song. ~ ti.I:1 • Signal to the children that it is the end of the English lesson by singing or playing: Bye-bye song Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye! If there is time... Play the Number treasure hunt. ~*fJ Before the lesson, prepare several Preparation Tip! copies of the number flashcards or number mini flashcards and hide them around the classroom. If you have extra time available, the children can colour and make the mini flashcards during a lesson, or you can colour and make them yourself. When the worksheet is used for the first time, only use the mini flashcards for the numbers the children have learnt so far. Make sure it is possible for the children to find and reach the cards. If it is nice weather and you have a safe area to use outside, you might want to hide the flashcards outside for the children to find. • Tell the children which number they are looking for, for example say Can you find one? and show the children the flashcard for number one. • Encourage the children to search the classroom or the outside area and bring you any cards with one that they find. • When the children have found all the copies of one, then ask them to look for two and bring you these cards. • Then the children can look for the cards with three, and bring these to you. • If there is time and the children are still interested, you can encourage them to close their eyes and hide the cards for the children to find again. Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages fa
  27. 27. Unit 1 LESSON 4 • ACTION STORY 000 o Main Objective To listen to and join in w ith a simple action story. Key Words one, two, three Receptive Language Clap your hands. Classroom Language Listen. Stand up / Sit down, everyone. Where's (one)? Activities Introduce and mime the Hello action story. Play Where's one? Order the action story. Materials Checklist o Peter hand puppet o CD 2-5, 8 (routine songs), CD 11 o flashcards 5-7 (one, two, three) o Student's Book, p. 5 o coloured pencils or crayons o action story cut-outs (Worksheet 3) (optional) o scissors, glue and spare paper (optional) o If there is time: colour mini flashcards (Worksheet 4) Warm-up 1. Welcome the children and make a circle. @lm • Hold Peter on your hand and, as the children enter the classroom, make Peter say Hello! to each child. Encourage the children to say Hello! back. • Ask the children to sit in a circle or semi-circle. Say Sit in a circle. and, while the children are moving and sitting down, you can sing or play: fa Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Circle song Come with me, Come with me, Make a circle. Come with me, Come with me, One, two, three. 2. Sing the Hello song. @liiii • Sing or play the Hello song and make Peter look like he is singing too. Hello song Hello, hello, It's nice to see you. Hello, hello, It's nice to see you. Carpet Time 3. Introduce the Hello action story. • Say Listen. and then stand where all the children can clearly see you. • Say the lines from the action story and show the correct action as you say the line. Hello action story Hello! (wave or salute to say hello) Clap your hands! (clap your hands) Bye-bye! (wave goodbye and turn around as if walking away) • If you still have the children's attention, repeat the story so they watch you do it twice. 4. Mime the action story. • Ask the children to stand up. Say Stand up, everyone. and encourage the children to stand up in the circle. • Repeat the action story and encourage the children to join in and copy your actions as you say each line. • If the children are interested, do this a couple of times, telling the action story in the correct order. • If the children seem confident with the action story, you can mix up the order of the lines and check the children still do the correct actions. 5. Play Where's one? • Ask the children to sit down in the circle. Say Sit down, everyone. • Show the children the number flashcards in the correct order and elicit the number on each of the cards by counting the spots on the dice. • Mix up the flashcards and put them on the floor in the centre of the circle with the picture facing down. • Say Where's one? and hold up one finger. • Encourage the children to point to the flashcard they think is number one, then select a child to turn the card over. • If it is the correct card, praise the children and repeat the activity asking the children to find another number.
  28. 28. Ip ~n ry, le Irn • If it is not the flashcard for number one, say No, sorry. Put the flashcard back on the floor face down and encourage the children to guess again where number one is. Pencil and Paper 6. Sing the Table song. @: G'" • Say It's time to sit at the table. and indicate to the children that you would like them to go and sit down at the tables. • While the children are moving to the table, sing or play: Table song Come with me, Come with me. Sit at a table, One, two, three. (Repeat) 7. Order the action story. §:}] @: G·li. m.,.l,jj If you think the children w ill find it difficult to order the pictures in the Student's Book, you can use the action story cut-outs (Worksheet 3) instead . You can I cut out the pictures on the worksheet before the lesso~n JI or help the children with cutting if they are not able to use scissors yet. • Hold up your copy of the Student's Book open to the correct page and show the children the pictures from the action story. • Point to each of the pictures and say the actions. You can also encourage the children to do the actions at the table. • Give the children their Student's Books open to the correct page. Say the actions from the action story again and encourage the children to point to the correct picture. • Say Listen. and play the action story on the CD. Encourage the children to point to the correct picture of each action again. • Help the children to draw one spot in the square for the first picture in the story, two spots for the second picture and three for the third . • If you are using the action story cut-outs (Worksheet 3), give each child a copy of the worksheet. • The children can then move the pictures around and put them in the correct order on the table in front of them . You can also repeat the actions from the action story and ask the children to hold up the correct picture for each action. • Once the children have ordered the cut up pictures, they can use these to help them number the pictures in the Student's Book. • If there is time, the children could stick the cut up pictures in the correct order on a clean sheet of paper. This can be taken home to show the parents. 8. Sing the Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmE). @l&i • If you would like the children to tidy away their crayons and other materials, say It's time to tidy up / clean up (AmE). • Start to collect the materials and encourage the children to help you. • While you are picking things up, sing or play: Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmE) Let's help each other And tidy up I clean up (AmEJ. Let's help each other And tidy up I clean up (AmEJ. Rounding Off 9. Sing the Bye-bye song. @: 'i.):' • While at the table, look at Peter and say It's time to go, Peter. • Make Peter wave and say Bye-bye! and encourage the children to wave and say Bye-bye! back to Peter. • Signal to the children that it is the end of the English lesson by singing or playing: Bye-bye song Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye, bye-bye, It's time to go. Bye-bye! If there is time... Play Stand on red. 1ImII Before the lesson, colour and Preparation Tip! laminate copies of the red and blue mini flashcards (Worksheet 4) so there are enough for each child to have one of each colour. • Spread the laminated copies of the mini flashcards around the room. • Play some music (either songs from Hooray! Starter or other English songs) and encourage the children to dance to the music. • Stop the music and say, for example, Stand on red. and encourage all the chi ldren to find a red mini flashcard to stand on . • Play the music again, and when the music stops, tell the children which colour to stand on. • Continue playing, changing which colour the children should stand on each time. Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages fa
  29. 29. Unit 1 LESSON 5 • STORY AND SONG o Main Objective To listen to a story and a song about a butterfly. Key Words Peter, Rosie red, blue butterfly Receptive Language Hello, Peter/Rosie. Look. It's red and blue. Wonderful. One, two, three. Dear Rosie, it's for you. Thank you. Bye-bye, Peter/Rosie. Classroom Language Look, it's a butterfly. Close/Open your eyes. Trace the line. Colour the butterfly. Value To develop appreciation for the value of friendship. Activities Introduce butterfly. Introduce The butterfly story. Play Peter or Rosie? Trace and colour the butterfly. Materials Checklist o Peter hand puppet o CD 2-6, 8 (routine songs), CD 12 o flashcards 1-4, 8 (Peter, Rosie, red, blue, butterfly) o Story cards 1-6 (The butterfly) o Student's Book, p. 7 o coloured pencils or crayons o The butterfly mini storybook (Worksheet 5a+b) (optional) fa Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Warm-up 1. Welcome the children and make a circle. ~Ii'ii • Make Peter greet the children and say Hello! Encourage the children to wave and say Hello! back. • When the children are all in the classroom, encourage them to sit in a circle. While you are making a circle, you can sing or play the Circle song (See Introduction, p. 17). 2. Sing the Hello song. @Jiiii • Sing or play the Hello song and make Peter look like he is singing too (See Introduction, p. 17). Carpet Time 3. Introduce butterfly. • Show the children the butterfly flashcard and say Look, it's a butterfly. • Make a butterfly shape with your hands by linking your thumbs and moving your fingers up and down together like butterfly wings. • Point to the butterfly's wings on the flashcard and say What colour is it? then elicit the colours red and blue from the children. • Say Can you make a butterfly? and help the children to make butterflies with their hands. If there is time, they can make their butterflies fly around the classroom. 4. Introduce The butterfly story. ~ ",IMfJ • If you want to use a transition marker to tell the children that the next activity is a story, then sing or play the Story song (CD 6): Story song It's time for a story Listen and look. (Repeat) • Either read the story from the back of the Story cards, or play the CD 12 and show the Story cards. .----------------------------------------------------------, , The butterfly , Peter: Hello, Rosie. , Rosie: Hello, Peter. , , : Peter: Look. A butterfly It's red and blue. Ahhh I Wonderful. Close your eyes, Rosie. Rosie: OK. Peter One, ... two, ... three. (singing): It's red and blue. It's red and blue. It's red and blue. Dear Rosie, it's for you. Rosie: Thank you! Bye-bye, Peter. Peter: Bye-bye, Rosie.
  30. 30. • If there is time, allow the children to listen to the story more than once. 5. Play Peter or Rosie? • Say Close your eyes. and demonstrate by holding your hands over your eyes, then peek to check the children have copied you . • Once all the children have covered their eyes, put either the flashcard for Peter or the flashcard for Rosie on the board or in the centre of the circle. • Say Open your eyes. and encourage the children to open their eyes. • Say Peter or Rosie? and point to the flashcard on the board or in the centre of the circle. Encourage the children to name the card you are pointing to. • Repeat this a few times changing the flashcard until the children seem confident with naming the two characters. Pencil and Paper 6. Sing the Table song. ~ 1i,,1 • Say It's time to sit at the table. and indicate to the children that you would like them to go and sit down at the tables. • While the children are moving to the table, sing or play the Table song (See Introduction, p. 17). 7. Trace and colour the butterfly. §1] • Hold up your Student's Book open to the correct page so the children can all see it clearly. Point to the butterfly on the page and elicit the word Butterfly. from the children. • Say Trace the line. and demonstrate how to trace the path from the butterfly to the window. • Give the children their Student's Books open to the correct page and allow them to trace the line. Praise the children for following the line carefully. • Then say Colour the butterfly red and blue. and start to colour some of the butterfly using red or blue. • Encourage the children to use only red and blue to colour the butterfly. • While the children are colouring, monitor the class and ask the children about the colour they are using or point to different parts of the butterfly and elicit the colour the children have coloured it. You can also print a copy of the mini Preparation Tip! storybook (Worksheet 5a+b) for each of the children to take home at the end of the lesson . If there is time, the children could colour one of the pages in the lesson, or they can colour it at home with their parents. You will need to cut and fold the mini storybooks for the children before the lesson (See Introduction, p. 11 ). 8. Sing the Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmE). ~ ti'" • If you would like the children to tidy away their crayons and other materials, say It's time to tidy up / clean up (AmE). • Start to collect the materials and encourage the children to help you. • While you are picking things up, sing or play the Tidy up song / Clean up song (AmE) (See Introduction, p. 17). Rounding Off 9. Sing the Bye-bye song. @: U,i:1 • While at the table, look at Peter and say It's time to go, Peter. • Make Peter wave and say Bye-bye! and encourage the children to wave and say Bye-bye! back. • Signal to the children that it is the end of the English lesson by singing or playing the Bye-bye song (See Introduction, p. 17). If there is time... Play Musical flashcards. • Put the butterfly, Peter and Rosie flashcards around the classroom in a place where they can easily be seen by the children and the children can safely move between the cards (attached to a wall or something that can't move is best). • Point to each of the cards around the room and elicit the name of the picture on the card from the children . • Play some music for the children to move around to. You could use some of the songs that the children have learnt so far. • Stop the music and encourage the children to choose a card to stand next to. • Once all the children are by a flashcard, randomly name one of the pictures. All the children standing by that flashcard are 'out' . Ask these children to stand near you for the next round and then allow them to join back in the game the round after. • Play the music again and allow the remaining children to move around the room and repeat the activity. Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages e
  31. 31. Unit 1 LESSON 6 • THINKING SKILLS Main Objective To match the characters with their silhouettes. Ke Words Peter, Rosie red, blue one, two, three butterfly Rece tive Language It's red and blue. Dear Rosie, it's for you. Classroom Language Hold up (one). Draw a line. Stick in the butterfly. Thinkin Skills Focusing on details and matching a coloured picture to the appropriate silhouette. Activities Play Say it louder! Sing the It's red and blue song. Play Hold it up. Match the silhouettes and stick in the butterfly. Materials Checklist Cl Peter hand puppet Cl CD 2-5, 8 (routine songs), CD 13-14 Cl flashcards 1-8 (Peter, Rosie, red, blue, one, two, three, butterfly) Cl Student's Book, p. 9 o Cl sticker from the appendix of the Student's Book (butterfly) Cl coloured pencils or crayons Cl If there is time: number mini flashcards (Worksheet 2) CD Hooray! STARTER © Helbling Languages Warm-up 1. Welcome the children and make a circle. ~ ti.'. • Make Peter greet the children and say Hello! Encourage the children to wave and say Hello! back. • When the children are all in the classroom, encourage them to sit in a circle. While you are making a circle, you can sing or play the Circle song (See Introduction, p. 17). 2. Sing the Hello song. ~ U." • Sing or play the Hello song and make Peter look like he is singing too (See Introduction, p. 17). Carpet Time 3. Play Say it louder! • Show the children the red flashcard and elicit the colour from the children. • Make Peter say Shh! and whisper Red. Encourage the children to whisper it with Peter. • Say Red. repeatedly, each time a little louder, and have the children repeat until the last time you shout it and then say Shh! and whisper Red. again. • Repeat this with the blue flashcard or with some of the other vocabulary from this unit. • After some time you can try different voices, for example, try singing the word, or saying it with a high squeaky voice and then a deep low voice. Or try saying the word while you are holding your nose or wobbling your lips using your finger. 4. Sing the It's red and blue song. ~ti·I"d • Hold up the flashcard for the butterfly and elicit the word Butterfly. from the children. • Play or sing the song from the story: It's red and blue It's red and blue. It's red and blue. It's red and blue. Dear Rosie, it's for you. Dear Rosie, it's for you I Dear Rosie, it's for you! (Repeat) • On the last line of the song, make Peter give the butterfly flashcard to the Rosie flashcard. • Continue to sing the song. You can change Rosie's name to one of the children's names and give the butterfly flashcard to the child instead using the karaoke track (CD 14).

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