THE                                              D. Brent WilliamsROTARY       Zone 34 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordina...
THE                                               MARCY ULLOMROTARY                                               Rotary C...
THE                                                 Carlos GiraldoROTARY                              Rotary Public Image ...
D. Brent WilliamsCarlos Giraldo                       MARCY ULLOM
D. Brent WilliamsCarlos Giraldo                       MARCY ULLOM
D. Brent WilliamsCarlos Giraldo                       MARCY ULLOM
C
The                            Rotary Foundation                                                                          ...
THE       ROTARY FOUNDATION                               Debra LoweAnnual Giving Officer, TRF   Major Gifts Officer,     ...
THE             Peter DebergeROTARYFOUNDATION
THE                                             Bill WoulfinROTARY                                         DRFC Chair 6900...
THE                                             Bill GriffinROTARY                                         DRFC Chair 6970...
The Rotary Foundation    Future Vision
The Rotary Foundation               Future Vision• Not as cataclysmic as portrayed• Keep simple – mission unchanged• More ...
Historical                       Total Giving $400,000      DSG             District DDF                           World F...
Foundation Donation Flow$      $400,000 in 2010             2011            2012              2013                        ...
New Grant Model•   District Grants•   Global Grants
Areas of Focus•   Water and Sanitation•   Disease Prevention and Treatment•   Maternal and Child Health•   Basic Education...
District Grants• Single annual “block” grant• Spending Plan• Local projects no minimum• Local or international• Local deci...
Global Grants•   Humanitarian Work (> $30,000)•   Vocational Training Team (VTT)•   Scholars•   Packaged Grants•   Address...
Global Grants – Scholars• Post-graduate work• Can be for more than one year• Global Grant application – must be  greater t...
Global Grants – Vocational Training Teams• Have a mission, often skill or  knowledge transfer• Can have more than one Rota...
THE                                             Bill GriffinROTARY                                         DRFC Chair 6970...
Preparation Steps - District• Establish work teams to address:   – District Structure Requirements   – Club Education Deve...
Preparation Steps - District• Comprehend District MOU• Establish Stewardship/Audit Committee• Establish District Financial...
Preparation Steps - District• Establish District Calendar of Events• Create Robust District Foundation Website• Develop Cl...
Preparation Steps - District• Establish District Grant application process   – (forms, review and decision committee)• Est...
Preparation Steps - District• Understand Scholar program and changes• Identify key stakeholders in past Scholar program – ...
Preparation Steps - District• Understand difference between GSE and VTT• Identify key GSE stakeholders and engage• Determi...
Preparation Steps - District• Understand principles of sustainability• Importance of community needs assessment• Understan...
Preparation Steps - District• Comprehend Club MOU• Develop Grant Management Seminar• Present requirements for clubs to qua...
Preparation Steps - District• Present revisions to clubs, with lead time for new  calendar• Calendar changes are significa...
Preparation Steps - Club• Comprehend Club MOU  – Terms of qualifications  – Club leadership responsibilities  – Financial ...
Preparation Steps - Club• Understand requirements for clubs to qualify  for grants  – Signed Club Memorandum of Understand...
Preparation Steps - Club• Understand Global vs. District Grant  – Global > $30,000• Understand Sustainability and  Measura...
Future Vision              A New Vocabulary                Revised Concepts and Ways–   Six Areas of Focus–   Global Grant...
Global Projects (2010-2012)•   Marietta (3) Economic Devel.   $49,500•   Marietta Metro (2)Water        $56,100•   Vinings...
Global Projects (2010-2012)•   Roswell Child Health         $48,166•   Buckhead (1) Disease Prev.   $34,460•   Emory Druid...
Global Projects (2010-2012)•   Griffin Economic,Water       $32,650•   N. Columbus Health           $30,000•   District Gl...
Global Projects (2010-2012)• Bartram Trail Water/Sanitation $35,000• Orange Park Sunrise Water/Sanitation/School Aids   $3...
District Projects (2010-2012)•   Local grants (141)/(43)•   Range $1,000 - $25,000/ $600 - $50,000•   Local Scholars Inter...
TheRotary Foundation
The                               Rotary Foundation                                               Bill Griffin       Abby ...
THE                  James RobinsonROTARYFOUNDATION   Future Vision Pilot Operations                         Division Mana...
Successes• Greater focus; better project design• Surpassing minimum threshold• Rolling application process• More innovatio...
For the months ended March 2010, 2011 & 2012   • FY10-11 Pilot Increase: 15.0%        – Non-pilot district increase: 9.6% ...
•2012 InternationalAssembly                           L                        Plateau•2012 RRFC Institute       E        ...
• 2012 GETS &  Rotary Institutes• 2013 International       L                        Plateau  Assembly                 E   ...
THE                                        Abby McNearROTARY                     Manager, Pilot Operations DepartmentFOUND...
Areas of Focus•   Water and Sanitation•   Disease Prevention and Treatment•   Maternal and Child Health•   Basic Education...
Area of Focus Policy Statements• Approved by Trustees in March 2012• Clarifies how TRF reviews GG applications• More detai...
Area of Focus & ScholarshipsIntended for career-minded professionalsTRF reviews:•Applicant’s prior work experience within ...
Rotary Scholar Examples          Eligible or Ineligible?• Architecture studies, career rebuilding/renovating  housing in B...
Disease Prevention & Treatment• Emphasis on health promotion in addition to disease• Equipment purchases• Medical missions...
•     Developing Sustainable Projects     •     Sustainability means different things to different organizations. For The ...
TheRotary Foundation
The                            Rotary Foundation                                                                          ...
THE             Peter DeBergeROTARYFOUNDATION
THE                                            Robert HallROTARY                    Zone 34 End Polio Now CoordinatorFOUND...
Polio Eradication is our legacy & so are they
Rotary’s #1 PriorityKeeping our promise isKey to our Membership  Key to our Brand
Rotary Chose This Fight
No New Global Project until    Polio Eradication is        Completed
Committed to aPolio-Free World
IndiaPolio virus transmission interrupted as of                 25 Feb 2012
We Made a Difference!
Nigeria95% reduction in polio cases from2009 to 2010
AfghanistanAccessing difficult areas
PakistanImproving surveillanceRenewing commitment
Where are we today?Only 3 countries where the wild polio   virus has not been interrupted.  Pakistan - Afghanistan - Niger...
ROTARY’S CHALLENGE NOWTO REMAIN FOCUSED ON OUR GOAL      OF WORLDWIDE POLIO          ERADICATION.
What can we Rotarians do?• Create public awareness and encourage  support from government and private sector  donors• Fina...
THESE MEN AGREE, WE MUST
Please Join Us for theRotary International Convention in Beautiful Lisboa, Portugal       June 23 - 26, 2013
THE             Peter DoetschmanROTARY       Planned Giving OfficerFOUNDATION   The Rotary Foundation
Major and Planned Gifts    2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute   87
Identify         Cultivate                                         Solicit                                            Than...
• Gifts that benefit The Rotary Foundation’s  Permanent Fund after the donor’s death• Testamentary Gift Options:   • Benef...
• A Benefactor is an individual or couple that has  made a provision in their estate plan, or made an  outright gift of $1...
A Bequest Society                          member is an individual or                           couple that has made a    ...
• Charitable Gift Annuity• Deferred Charitable Gift Annuity• Charitable Remainder Trust                2012 Regional Rotar...
• US$100,000: One Area of Focus via Global Grants• US$250,000: One Area of Focus + district  designation• US$500,000: One ...
• Major Gift Initiative    - US$95 million goal• Endowed and Term Gifts• Multiple Naming Opportunities             2012 Re...
Arch C. Klumph                                    Bequest                                  Society                      Ma...
Annual Fund CULTIVATE                                      ASKMajor gifts        CULTIVATE                                ...
• Debra Lowe  Major Gifts Officer, Zone 34• Joanne Bertsche  Annual Giving Officer, Zones 33 and 34• Peter Doetschman  Pla...
•   Lead by example•   Work as a team•   Educate•   Ask•   Thank             2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator I...
THEROTARY         Steve LyonsFOUNDATION   SHARE System Senior                     Coordinator 
SHARE       How can our district spend the DDF?PAST               PRESENT                   FUTURE
SHARE             When do we start spending the district’s 2013-14 DDF?JUL 2012       JAN 2013         JUL 2013 AUG 2013  ...
SHAREWhere does the district’s unspent DDF from 2012-13 go?   2012-13                                 2013-14
SHARE       How can our district spend the DDF?PAST               PRESENT                   FUTURE
THEROTARY             Candice EmblingFOUNDATION   TRF Packaged Grants manager                    The Rotary Foundation
Packaged Global Grants         Overview         Agenda• What are packaged grants?• Why does TRF offer packaged  grants?• W...
Grant Types in Future VisionDistrict Grants   Global Grants   Packaged Grants
Why Package?• Demonstration projects• Visibility/Promotion with other global organizations• Involvement opportunity for cl...
What are Strategic Partners?•   NGOs, universities, corporations•   Global scope of work•   Expertise in an Area of Focus•...
What are Packaged Grants?• Opportunities for Rotary clubs and districts• Pre-designed projects funded by the World  Fund a...
Developing Local Entrepreneurs: Oikocredit • Connection between local   Rotary clubs and   microfinance institutions • Tra...
Nursing Scholarships/Training Health    Educators: Aga Khan University• Activities take place at 3 campuses:  Kenya, Ugand...
Medical Service and Training:Mercy Ships• Activities related to the  Africa Mercy• Upcoming ports in Togo  and Guinea• Voc...
Water Scholarships: UNESCO-IHE• Scholars will study in  the Netherlands• Focus on building long-  term connections in the ...
Questions?
THE                           Jeremy HurstROTARY                    Governor 2013-2014             Rotary International Di...
Update on District 7020’sTransition Plan for a Non - Pilot District
District 7020 – overview• 2650± Rotarians• 84 Clubs• 10 Countries• 16 Islands• 3 languages• 1300 Miles• 1 day travel time
District 7020 – Challenges• Diversity – Population, Economics, Socially, Language.• Clubs with 10 to 100+ members.• Small ...
District 7020 - Strengths• CHALLENGES:Logistical, Geographical,Climatic, Organisational, Financial,• OPPORTUNITIES:To serv...
District 7020 – TRF Support• Annual Programs Fund 2007/8 $332,854       2008/9 $161,320 2009/10 $264,000      2010/11 $253...
District 7020 – TRF Support• Matching Grants $819,407 in 2009-10                     $1,143,726 in 2010-11• Competitive Ma...
District 7020 – Goals • Ensure success of existing TRF programmes whilst implementing Future Vision - in parallel. • Dedic...
ImplementationPreparing the way….• Align activities with the areas of focus• Develop relationship with pilot district• Bui...
ImplementationDemystify – what changes / stays same?• New Grant Model• Global Grants - District Grants (+ Packaged Grants)...
Seven Areas of Focus   Rum Tasting   Peace and Conflict Resolution   Disease Prevention and Treatment   Water and Sanitati...
Six Areas of Focus   Peace and Conflict Resolution   Disease Prevention and Treatment   Water and Sanitation   Maternal an...
District 7020 – 2011-14 FV Plan• Four year plan• 2010-11• Appoint District FV Chair• Build awareness• High level training•...
District 7020 – FV Plan 2011-14• Four year plan• 2012-13•   FVACs and Club FV Chairs    Educate & train clubs    Newslette...
D7020 Organisational Structure                       ! "#$%"&$( ) * ) %+$, % . +/ 0! , $"+01. / $/ %                      ...
District 7020 – Grant Procedures• District Grants Committee Chair, DG, DGE, DRFC  Largest $ APF gross and per capita  Larg...
ImplementationWebinars playing a vital role….• Attend RI - TRF Training Webinars• District Steering Committee Communicatio...
ImplementationNew D7020 Foundation Websiterotaryfoundation7020.org• Developed withPilot Mentor District6970 - via Webinar•...
On JULY 1st 2013     The Future Vision of    The Rotary Foundation          becomesOur Rotary Foundation. ONLY 393 DAYS FR...
THE                                             Garland MooreROTARY       District 6910 Future Vision Transition Team Chai...
The                           Rotary Foundation                                         Dianne   Garland Moore            ...
THE                                              RICH PANYIKROTARY                          District 6910 Permanent Fund C...
THE                                          Dianne CammarataROTARY                                             DRFC Chair...
THE                                                 Alan SmithROTARY       District 6910 Future Vision Transition Team Vic...
THE                                            Sally PlattROTARY       Rotary International District 6900 Grants ChairFOUN...
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12
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Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12

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Rotary Zone 34 Foundation Seminar on the Future Vision Plan. RRFC Brent Williams

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  • To simplify the grant-making process, the Future Vision Plan offers only two types of grants: Rotary Foundation District Grants and Rotary Foundation Global Grants. The new grant model of the Future Vision Plan optimizes contributions to our Foundation by helping clubs and districts use Foundation funds for greater impact, greater flexibility, and greater sustainability.
  • The Trustees of The Rotary Foundation have identified six areas of focus for the new grant structure. These areas reflect critical humanitarian issues and needs that Rotarians are already addressing worldwide. They will align Rotary with other international development efforts and will strategically further the Foundation's mission. Each of the areas has specific goals associated with the area. The Trustees have committed to these areas of focus for at least nine years. In fact, the Trustees are encouraging nonpilot clubs and districts to focus their current Foundation program activity in these six areas even before the Future Vision Plan is rolled out to the entire Rotary world.
  • Rotary Foundation District Grants support the overall mission of The Rotary Foundation, but do not necessarily tie to the six areas of focus, thereby allowing a broad range of choices for clubs and districts. The district can apply annually for one District Grant – a “block grant” so to speak – for up to 50% of its available District Designated Funds for that Rotary Year - after reviewing requests from its Rotarians and clubs. The district will then issue the money and report to its clubs how all the funds were utilized. The Foundation itself will require very minimal reporting, thanks to the advance planning done by clubs and districts before the funds are requested. This will enable districts to close out their grants quickly. District grants are intended to support smaller activities and projects both locally and internationally.
  • The other type of grant -- Rotary Foundation Global Grants – will fund projects and activities that are sustainable and measurable and relate to the goals of the areas of focus. In order to support these goals, global grants will provide larger awards for projects and activities with a minimum World Fund award of $15,000, resulting in a total project cost of US$30,000 and above. Clubs and districts may develop their own global grant projects or they can choose from a menu of packaged global grants that the Foundation will develop in conjunction with its strategic partners. While the initial “menu” will be small, it will grow throughout pilot. As long as they relate to the goals of an area of focus, global grants provide freedom from programmatic rules, and include a World Fund match, making them a more flexible and economical option for scholarships. In addition, clubs can partner together to develop holistic projects that incorporate humanitarian and educational activities in the same grant, again, as long as it relates to the areas of focus.
  • FVC Report to Trustees, September 2011 JOE/JAMES Successes Some of the successes of the FV Pilot to date have been the acceptance of the areas of focus, which provides TRF with a greater profile beyond polio eradication. Districts have made good use of the flexibility offered through district grants, financing small local service projects, as well as some of the traditional grant activities such as GSE and in some cases large international service projects. Scholarships have been particularly popular as districts can fund local students to attend local schools with their district grants. Clubs are starting to submit global grant applications that have more focused outcomes with the areas of focus and meet the new minimum request amount of $15.000. A very small number of applications have had to be declined because they did not meet the new requirements. Four partnerships have been approved by the Trustees and the Foundation is rolling out packaged grant opportunities with each partner. Opportunities Some of the opportunities or challenges experienced so far in the pilot have been with the global grant process. There are still opportunities to further simplify the application process and the online experience for Rotarians. Another challenge is helping clubs and districts to understand what is required to make their projects sustainable in the long term. There is still a focus on short term, one time projects that provide a piece of medical equipment for example, without any thought about how the needs in the community will be met after the equipment is no longer viable. The pilot has created some difficulties for districts that have partnered together in the past. In order to test the FV model, it was necessary for the pilot districts to be utilizing the same grant system and meeting all the same requirements, which means that they are unable to partner with nonpilot districts using the traditional grant programs. Nonpilot districts are hungry for more information about transitioning into FV. Greater details and information will be made available to nonpilot districts this year, however, until the Trustees finalize the FV grant making model in March 2012, they will not receive final training until the 2012-13 Rotary year.
  • Business Operations Model and Operating Strategy for FV Plan, Aug 2008 James and Andris Compared to the survey conducted in February, twice as many Rotarians respond to the November survey (132 in Feb-11 and 257 in Nov-11). The overall response rate is the same- 46%. The increased number of respondents helps confirm the findings of the first survey and the change in the percentage of Rotarians who changed their answers from “somewhat agree” to “strongly agree” indicates that Rotarians are getting used to the new model and are becoming more confident in their answers.
  • ANNE MATTHEWS STAFF RESOURCES: JOE BROWNLEE and SARAH REMIJAN MOVE A-13-g, Future Vision Training—WAIT FOR SECOND The committee spoke at length about the training plans for the next 18 months. (ANNE, Add your own thoughts here if you wish) It is critically important we all support our RRFCs, DGs, DRFCs, and other district leaders as they are the key to our success. To reach our goal, we have just under 2 years. For this Rotary year 2011-12, we are focusing on getting non-pilot districts up to speed and aware for the basics on Future Vision. In 2012-13, the training plan takes a more detailed approach in educating Rotarians about all the details. And, finally, the Trustees and Directors both agreed at their January meetings to provide a resource to conveners and regional training teams. These FV trainers have been invited and appointed with the goal of having them be part of the training teams in each region to provide consistent and motivational information I’d ask Sarah Remijan and Joe Brownlee to offer more details on the training plans.
  • JOE / SARAH STOP FOR COMMENTS, AMENDMENTS AND VOTE ON A-13-g
  • The Trustees of The Rotary Foundation have identified six areas of focus for the new grant structure. These areas reflect critical humanitarian issues and needs that Rotarians are already addressing worldwide. They will align Rotary with other international development efforts and will strategically further the Foundation's mission. Each of the areas has specific goals associated with the area. The Trustees have committed to these areas of focus for at least nine years. In fact, the Trustees are encouraging nonpilot clubs and districts to focus their current Foundation program activity in these six areas even before the Future Vision Plan is rolled out to the entire Rotary world.
  • Welcome to Fundraising Future Vision as it relates to Major Gifts and Endowed Fund Gifts SPEAKER Introduce yourself From your earlier session, does everyone remember the distinction between a major donor and a major gift? Smaller gifts (general Annual Fund, sustaining member, EREY, PHFs, small term gifts) the key is to educate and understand desire but to have repeated asks. Every presentation, meeting, conference, etc. should have a reference to supporting The Rotary Foundation and asking often for this support. Larger Major Gifts necessitate more cultivation and understanding of what the individual donor ’s interests are. There are more meetings and coordination with the donor and the “ask” should be strategic and followed by due diligence in ensuring the donor is ready for the larger commitment and coordination through TRF as to the method of contributions (outright, bequests, endowments, etc.) This larger gifts include Peace Center endowments, Future Vision term gifts, larger gifts to the Annual Fund, larger endowments and bequests).
  • You might recall these four tenants from the session on Annual Giving. They involve developing strategies to acquire new donors, retain those already giving, and invite those with the capacity and commitment to consider increasing support over time, and continually thank and appreciate the contributions that are given to support our Foundation. These are also the four general tenants for fundraising for Major Gifts but just on a different scale. As a Rotary Leader you need to work on ways to do all four steps listed above. IDENTIFY - Major Gift Donors are often Rotary leaders, often regular Annual Fund donors, they have capacity and propensity - Work with TRF staff to obtain lists of current Major Donors, BQS Members, Benefactors, Paul Harris Society Members, etc. - Getting clubs involved in Identification process is key CULTIVATE - Senior Leader and Million Dollar Dinners - Fireside Chats (small targeted gatherings) - Rotary Peace Centers dinners & receptions - Follow up! SOLICIT Generally, you must ask for a major gift in order to receive one. Do your homework – know the background and interest of the potential donor. What Rotary initiative will they most likely support? Set a specific appointment with the prospect, make the visit, and ask for the prospect ’s major gift. Arrange a 30-minute meeting in the prospect ’s home or other private, informal environment. Be clear on the purpose of the meeting and the individuals who will be accompanying you. Include the spouse if appropriate. Plan your solicitation – Who will give the background? Who will actually solicit the gift? Discuss possible objections and how to overcome them. -Extra pointers: Let the donor determine the gift, do not speak up offering to reduce the gift amount, let the donor determine the outcome. Once the ask is made do not fill silent time, wait for the donor to respond and listen to what they have to say. When the donor asks questions or has objections, take your time in responding. Be thoughtful and think about a response in a non-defensive manner and in an unapologetic way. You need to have a follow-up conversation after solicitation. THANK - Recognition opportunities at local events - Phone, mail, and email correspondence - You can never thank too much!
  • Trustee decisions further support major gift donors for specificity in their giving. A decision taken at the Trustees June 2010 meeting approved giving opportunities to the Permanent Fund for global grants. This decision allows donors to direct contributions of any size to an area of focus and the spendable earnings of these gifts will provide general support via global grants. For gifts of US$100,000 more, a special fund carrying the name of the donor, or loved one, can be established to benefit an area of focus. $250,000 or more endows a special fund and provides support to a particular area of focus and can specify a district to participate. Jamie - INSERT MENU FROM 25K TO 1 MIL FOR ENDOWED FUNDS Endowed Funds: Endowed funds require a specific threshold amount and offer the ability to create and name an endowed fund within the Permanent Fund. The fund can carry the name of the donor, or loved one, and be tracked and reported on separately (for instance, the Robert and Jane Smith Endowed Global Grant for Maternal and Child Health). Donor options vary depending upon the size and purpose of the gift commitment $25,000 Endowed Fund Endows a fund that provides support –to the World Fund (spent at Trustees ’ discretion) or SHARE (District Designated Fund and World Fund). $50,000 Rotary Peace Centers – General Support Endows a fund to provide general support for Rotary Peace Centers. Additional naming opportunities are available. $100,000 Area of Focus Endows a fund that provides general support to one of six areas of focus via the Global Grant structure. $250,000 Area of Focus and District Participation Endows a fund that provides support to a particular Area of Focus and specifies a district to participate. The donor may also designate a specific project to support, such as a Scholarship, Vocational Training Team or Humanitarian project. $500,000 Area of Focus and Geographic Location Endows a fund as described above and allows the donor to specify a geographic location where the funds are to be used. $1,000,000 Customized Tailored to meet the philanthropic goals of the donor through TRF programs. US$100,000: Endows a fund to provide general support to an Area of Focus via Global Grants US$250,000: Endows a fund for one Area of Focus and designates a district to participate US$500,000: Endows a fund for one Area of Focus and designates a geographic region to benefit US$1,000,000+: Tailored to match donor interest with Foundation needs and capabilities
  • Most of the $95 million being raised will reside in the Permanent Fund, earnings will support the program. A smaller portion of the initiative will include term gifts to fund the program today until it can be permanently endowed.
  • What are some examples of recognition opportunities you provide donors in your Zones? Major Donor Pin Major Donor Crystal Arch Klumph Society Pin (AKS) Arch Klumph Society (AKS) Crystal Arch Klumph Induction Ceremony Arch Klumph Society Dinner Major Donor Listing on the: Club Level District Level Zone Level International Level Major Donor Functions on the: Club Level District Level Zone Level International Level
  • The above ratio graph shows the difference in time and energy spent cultivating a donor depending on the gift being pursued. Smaller gifts (general Annual Fund, sustaining member, EREY, PHFs, small term gifts) the key is to educate and understand desire but to have repeated asks. Every presentation, meeting, conference, etc. should have a reference to supporting The Rotary Foundation and asking often for this support. Larger Major Gifts necessitate more cultivation and understanding of what the individual donor ’s interests are. There are more meetings and coordination with the donor and the “ask” should be strategic and followed by due diligence in ensuring the donor is ready for the larger commitment and coordination through TRF as to the method of contributions (outright, bequests, endowments, etc.) This larger gifts include Peace Center endowments, Future Vision term gifts, larger gifts to the Annual Fund, larger endowments and bequests). Ultimate Major Gifts- These involve the most amount of cultivation. This includes education, coordination with spouse and financial planners, appropriate timing for the ask and significant coordination with TRF to ensure the donors wishes are met and hopefully exceeded. These large gifts are seen in the form of AKS membership, large endowments, Peace Centers, large Term Gifts for Future Vision, etc.) The ask should ideally happen only once with the donor at the time that is pre-determined and thought out. These gifts would not be asked in public or very frequently as they require much more in-depth time, experience and
  • Important to note that packaged and global grants must: Incorporate sustainability Address an area of focus Include measurable impact During the pilot, packaged grants were considered a subset of global grants. However, during full launch they will be presented as a stand-along grant type. Please note, however, that packaged grants do NOT represent exceptions to the core components of global grants previously discussed.
  • *Strategic Partners are organizations (NGOs, universities, corporations, etc) with unique or specialized knowledge or expertise in one or more Areas of Focus; global scope of work, with whom we will develop a formal relationship to secure resources (funding, advocacy, or expertise) to enhance Rotarian service opportunities through developing packaged grants. These packaged grants can be for humanitarian projects, vocational training teams, or scholarships.
  • Packaged global grants are unique to the Future Vision Plan and the new grant model in that they are the grants supported by TRF and the strategic partner. The grants/projects are then “packaged” and offered as project opportunities for Rotarians in pilot districts. Rotary clubs in pilot districts will have the opportunity to work with The Rotary Foundation ’s strategic partners on pre-designed projects funded by the World Fund and the strategic partner. With “pre-design”, we mean that a general framework is created for the projects with input from various stakeholders at the partner organization, TRF/RI and Rotarians. These projects and activities support the areas of focus and can include scholarships, humanitarian projects, and vocational training. Because the initial work of finding a strategic partner and designing the general framework of the project has already been done, Rotarians can focus their talents and energies on the implementation.
  • Oikocredit is one of the world ’s largest private provider of financing to microfinance institutions. The … Lend funds to microfinance institutions (MFIs) all over the world. - the MFIs in turn make loans to entrepreneurs - special emphasis on rural areas and women. Oikocredit is headquartered in the Netherlands with 11 regional offices. They currently support a network of some 790 MFIs in 70 countries, reached over 17.5 million loan recipients. This partnership will support the goals of the Economic and Community Development Area of Focus by strengthening the dev of local entrepreneurs and community leaders in impoverished communities and by building the capacity of local organizations and community networks to support economic development . PGs: - connecting individual Rotary clubs with an individual MFI to address needs in their communities - i.e., literacy training to illiterate MFI clients; business skill training … ..to at-risk communities who then can access loans through the MFI. This relationship will allow the MFI to handle the loans while the Rotarians focus on what they do best – social mobilization and being business people.
  • The partnership between Rotary and Aga Khan University (AKU) was officially launched in May, 2011. AKU is an agency of the Aga Khan Development Network, is focused on increasing the number and the skill set of professionals in the developing world by providing access to opportunities in higher education and research. AKU operates 11 campuses in eight countries, including the AKU School of Nursing (AKU-SON) with locations in District 9200, East Africa. Through this partnership and packaged global grant activities, Rotarians will be working with the AKU-SON campuses in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. The nursing curriculum reflects the local community needs and government systems where the school is located and where the students work and reside. As a result, what the students learn can be directly applied to their current work. This partnership will support of the goals of the Maternal and Child Heath area of focus through improving access to trained health care providers for mothers and their children. In addition, there will be secondary impacts on the goals of Disease Prevention and Treatment area of focus through improving the capacity of local heath care providers. Packaged Grants with AKU will be of two types: scholarships for nurses and midwives, with Rotarians selecting the recipients and providing mentoring to them, and vocational training teams that will support professional development at AKU. The VTT packaged global grants are currently available on-line, in all Rotary languages.
  • Partnership recently launched. Mercy Ships founded in 1978 with vision to use ships as mobile bases of operation to provide aid and assistance to communities in need. Their current ship, their fourth ship, is the Africa Mercy , which is expected to serve Africa for the next 30 years. - has six surgery suites; capacity of 7,000 surgeries per year - in port for about 10-11 months; then out for repairs and maintenance Ship has a 450 member international crew, all short and long term volunteers, including medical, administrative, and technical Although the current focus is West Africa, Mercy Ships has previously provided ship-based services to the Central America and Asia – working in a total of 53 developing nations. Based in U.S., has offices in: UK, Switzerland, Netherlands, Germany, Australia, Spain, Norway, South Africa, Canada, South Korea, New Zealand and Hong Kong. PGs: - Health care training and capacity building for local hospitals is a major focus for Mercy Ships. Based on successful projects with Mercy Ships and US, Latin American, and African Rotarians, Rotarians will develop vocational training teams (VTTs) composed of medical professionals who will perform or assist in critical surgeries. - also provide skill training to local healthcare professionals - Potential teams could include surgeons, nurses, or anesthesiologists.
  • UNESCO-IHE – still in negotiations based in Delft, the Netherlands - largest international post-graduate water education institution in the world - only institution w/in UN system to confer accredited MSc and PhD degrees. - Since 1957, the Institute has provided postgraduate education to more than 15,000 water professionals from 162 countries - vast majority of whom come from the developing world, with three years experience before applying . - subjects range from urban waste management systems and water conflict management to water treatment and water transportation and distribution. - The goal of the Institute is to develop the capacities of professionals in developing and emerging countries, enabling people to effectively solve their water issues . - * 98% of UNESCO-IHE students are from developing and emerging countries - %87 return to home country - Water and Sanitation Area of Focus - supporting the ed of prof studying in fields related to WATSAN who will have long-term impact on those global challenges PGs: - offer graduate level scholarships to students from developing countries, - **partially filling the void left by ending the scholarship fund pool for low income countries. - Rotarians will have the opportunity to interview and recommend scholarships for students enrolled in Master of Science degree-granting programs - 3 prog: Municipal Wtr & Infrastruct; Water Mgmt; Wtr Science & Enginr - Students from any pilot district would be eligible, once they had secured academic admittance from the Institute, as per Future Vision scholarship requirements.
  • in the Hurricane belt that crosses the Caribbean.
  • Plan and strategy for implementation through the creation of a District FV team.
  • Z34 Rotary Foundation Seminar 06-04-12

    1. 1. THE D. Brent WilliamsROTARY Zone 34 Regional Rotary Foundation CoordinatorFOUNDATION Governor 2006-2007 Rotary International District 6970
    2. 2. THE MARCY ULLOMROTARY Rotary CoordinatorFOUNDATION Zone 34 Rotary International District 6990 Governor 2008-2009
    3. 3. THE Carlos GiraldoROTARY Rotary Public Image CoordinatorFOUNDATION Zone 34 Rotary International District 6980 Governor 2008-2009
    4. 4. D. Brent WilliamsCarlos Giraldo MARCY ULLOM
    5. 5. D. Brent WilliamsCarlos Giraldo MARCY ULLOM
    6. 6. D. Brent WilliamsCarlos Giraldo MARCY ULLOM
    7. 7. C
    8. 8. The Rotary Foundation Bill Griffin Lee Phares Assistant RRFC, Zone Assistant RRFC, Zone 34 34 District 6970 Keenan Kern District 6990 Russ MillerAssistant RRFC, Zone 34 District 6920 Assistant RRFC, Zone 34 District 6950
    9. 9. THE ROTARY FOUNDATION Debra LoweAnnual Giving Officer, TRF Major Gifts Officer, TRF
    10. 10. THE Peter DebergeROTARYFOUNDATION
    11. 11. THE Bill WoulfinROTARY DRFC Chair 6900 Zone 34FOUNDATION Rotary International District 6900 Governor 2007-2008 
    12. 12. THE Bill GriffinROTARY DRFC Chair 6970FOUNDATION Zone 34 Rotary International District 6970 Governor 2008-2009 
    13. 13. The Rotary Foundation Future Vision
    14. 14. The Rotary Foundation Future Vision• Not as cataclysmic as portrayed• Keep simple – mission unchanged• More local control and also responsibility• Read, talk to Pilot Districts, identify key issues• Calendar impact
    15. 15. Historical Total Giving $400,000 DSG District DDF World Fund $40,000 $160,000 $200,000 Club Projects Amb Scholar Matching Grants Matching Grants GSE Future Vision Total Giving $400,000 District Grant Global Fund DDF World Fund $100,000 $100,000 $200,000Projects < $30,000 Projects > $30,000 Projects > $30,000 Local Scholars VTT VTT GSE Scholars Scholars
    16. 16. Foundation Donation Flow$ $400,000 in 2010 2011 2012 2013 $200,000 $ $200,000 50% to District Designated Fund 50% to World Fund $100,000 $100,000 Matches 1:1 DDF $ Up to ½ to At least ½ to and 50% of cash $ District Grants Global Grants
    17. 17. New Grant Model• District Grants• Global Grants
    18. 18. Areas of Focus• Water and Sanitation• Disease Prevention and Treatment• Maternal and Child Health• Basic Education and Literacy• Economic and Community Development• Peace and Conflict Prevention/Resolution
    19. 19. District Grants• Single annual “block” grant• Spending Plan• Local projects no minimum• Local or international• Local decision making/flexibility• Can include Scholars &/or GSE• Not tied to Six Areas of Focus
    20. 20. Global Grants• Humanitarian Work (> $30,000)• Vocational Training Team (VTT)• Scholars• Packaged Grants• Address Six Areas of Focus• Must show local community buy in• Must show sustainability!!• Proposal/Application
    21. 21. Global Grants – Scholars• Post-graduate work• Can be for more than one year• Global Grant application – must be greater than $30,000• Six Areas of Focus• Must show how education will further mission of TRF• Award decision by TRF• Logistics up to Club/District
    22. 22. Global Grants – Vocational Training Teams• Have a mission, often skill or knowledge transfer• Can have more than one Rotarian• Does not require 30 days• More than one trip allowed• Must address one or more of Six Areas of Focus• Must show sustainability!!• Logistics up to Club/District
    23. 23. THE Bill GriffinROTARY DRFC Chair 6970FOUNDATION Zone 34 Rotary International District 6970 Governor 2008-2009 
    24. 24. Preparation Steps - District• Establish work teams to address: – District Structure Requirements – Club Education Development – District Grant Process, Expectations and Changes – Global Grant Process, Expectations and Changes – Scholar Process Restructure – VTT vs GSE Understanding Structure and Fundamental Changes
    25. 25. Preparation Steps - District• Comprehend District MOU• Establish Stewardship/Audit Committee• Establish District Financial Management Plan and Requirements• Understand District Qualification Process
    26. 26. Preparation Steps - District• Establish District Calendar of Events• Create Robust District Foundation Website• Develop Club Education Plan
    27. 27. Preparation Steps - District• Establish District Grant application process – (forms, review and decision committee)• Establish calendar for District Grant applications and awards• Become familiar with District Grant spending plan requirements and final reporting requirements• Establish method of storing District Grant completed reports and receipts
    28. 28. Preparation Steps - District• Understand Scholar program and changes• Identify key stakeholders in past Scholar program – focus on this group with new Scholar program• Determine how you want to address scholars – understand programs – do you want to continue Ambassadorial Scholar type program – do you want to consider domestic scholar options
    29. 29. Preparation Steps - District• Understand difference between GSE and VTT• Identify key GSE stakeholders and engage• Determine desire for GSE look alike• Understand Vocational Training Teams – Club driven – Connection potential to Service Projects
    30. 30. Preparation Steps - District• Understand principles of sustainability• Importance of community needs assessment• Understand principles of community buy in• Become familiar with Global Grant on-line application process
    31. 31. Preparation Steps - District• Comprehend Club MOU• Develop Grant Management Seminar• Present requirements for clubs to qualify for grants – Signed Club Memorandum of Understanding – Grant Management Seminar attendance – Any other District requirements
    32. 32. Preparation Steps - District• Present revisions to clubs, with lead time for new calendar• Calendar changes are significant• Creates higher degree of year to year coordination and move away from “my year” projects• Revise District Foundation website to support clubs
    33. 33. Preparation Steps - Club• Comprehend Club MOU – Terms of qualifications – Club leadership responsibilities – Financial management/stewardship – Document retention (reports and receipts) – Signature of president and president-elect – Submitted annually
    34. 34. Preparation Steps - Club• Understand requirements for clubs to qualify for grants – Signed Club Memorandum of Understanding – Grant Management Seminar attendance – Any other District requirements• Understand project development process to meet grant application calendar
    35. 35. Preparation Steps - Club• Understand Global vs. District Grant – Global > $30,000• Understand Sustainability and Measurability• Understand application process
    36. 36. Future Vision A New Vocabulary Revised Concepts and Ways– Six Areas of Focus– Global Grants– District Grants– DDF allocation to Global and District– Needs Assessment– Sustainable– Measureable– VTTs (and GSEs)– Scholarships as Grants– Member Access as Gateway
    37. 37. Global Projects (2010-2012)• Marietta (3) Economic Devel. $49,500• Marietta Metro (2)Water $56,100• Vinings (13) Mobile Health $57,625• Atlanta West End Sanitation $30,000• East Cobb (3) Education $31,000• Clayton Water $30,000• Peachtree City (3) Literacy $34,400
    38. 38. Global Projects (2010-2012)• Roswell Child Health $48,166• Buckhead (1) Disease Prev. $34,460• Emory Druid Hills Water $62,250• Dunwoody (2) Water (2) $61,589• Atlanta Education $50,000• Newnan Literacy $ 1,000• Thomasville Child Health $30,000
    39. 39. Global Projects (2010-2012)• Griffin Economic,Water $32,650• N. Columbus Health $30,000• District Global Scholar $30,000• Multiple clubs Health $52,500• Gainesville Global Scholar $73,375
    40. 40. Global Projects (2010-2012)• Bartram Trail Water/Sanitation $35,000• Orange Park Sunrise Water/Sanitation/School Aids $37,550• Daytona Beach West Education/Economic Development $36,100
    41. 41. District Projects (2010-2012)• Local grants (141)/(43)• Range $1,000 - $25,000/ $600 - $50,000• Local Scholars International/Domestic• Disaster Recovery• Local/International• GSE teams (2)• Over $400,000/$275,000
    42. 42. TheRotary Foundation
    43. 43. The Rotary Foundation Bill Griffin Abby McNear RRFC Chair District 6970 Manager,Pilot Operations Department Bill Woulfin James Robinson Future Vision Pilot RRFC Chair Operations District 6900
    44. 44. THE James RobinsonROTARYFOUNDATION Future Vision Pilot Operations Division Manager The Rotary Foundation
    45. 45. Successes• Greater focus; better project design• Surpassing minimum threshold• Rolling application process• More innovation and collaboration
    46. 46. For the months ended March 2010, 2011 & 2012 • FY10-11 Pilot Increase: 15.0% – Non-pilot district increase: 9.6% • FY11-12 Pilot Increase: 7.6% – Non pilot district increase: 6.5%
    47. 47. •2012 InternationalAssembly L Plateau•2012 RRFC Institute E A R•PETS, District meetings N Steep acceleration I N•2012 International G Slow beginningConvention workshops TIME•Future Vision Trainers
    48. 48. • 2012 GETS & Rotary Institutes• 2013 International L Plateau Assembly E A• 2013 PETS and district R N Steep acceleration meetings I N• 2013 International G Slow beginning Convention TIME• 1 July 2013—GO!
    49. 49. THE Abby McNearROTARY Manager, Pilot Operations DepartmentFOUNDATION Program Officer, District Grants & Global Grants
    50. 50. Areas of Focus• Water and Sanitation• Disease Prevention and Treatment• Maternal and Child Health• Basic Education and Literacy• Economic and Community Development• Peace and Conflict Prevention/Resolution
    51. 51. Area of Focus Policy Statements• Approved by Trustees in March 2012• Clarifies how TRF reviews GG applications• More detail on scholarships• Biggest changes are in disease prevention & treatment• May 2012 Future Vision News has link
    52. 52. Area of Focus & ScholarshipsIntended for career-minded professionalsTRF reviews:•Applicant’s prior work experience within A of F•Academic program alignment with A of F•Applicant’s career plans related to A of F
    53. 53. Rotary Scholar Examples Eligible or Ineligible?• Architecture studies, career rebuilding/renovating housing in Bosnia (PCPR)• International relations studies, career in US State Department (PCPR)• MBA, career helping minorities access financial services in US inner-city environment (ECD)• International marketing degree, career in marketing (ECD)
    54. 54. Disease Prevention & Treatment• Emphasis on health promotion in addition to disease• Equipment purchases• Medical missions/surgeries
    55. 55. • Developing Sustainable Projects • Sustainability means different things to different organizations. For The Rotary Foundation, sustainability means providing solutions to community needs, ensuring that the benefiting community can maintain the activities after grant funding ends. Global grant projects must be sustainable and display the following characteristics: Community Materials/ Monitoring/ Funding Knowledge Motivation Needs Technology Evaluation Provide training, Have local Purchase Provide incentives education, and sponsors conduct equipment and for beneficiaries Confirm local community a thorough new technology and project Develop clear and funding source outreach toassessment of the from local sources, participants to measurable to provide strengthencommunity’s needs when possible. continue ongoing project objectives, long-term beneficiaries’ to identify a Ensure spare support. Identify and identify operation, capacity to meetneed that sponsors parts are readily personnel willing methods for maintenance, project objectives. are able to available. to lead beneficiaries collecting project repair, and Confirm that support and that Involve community to sustain project data. Establish project longevity. recipients have ameets beneficiaries’ members when outcomes. baseline data for Compensate plan to transfer needs and fits selecting Prepare the evaluation capable project participants knowledge to new their values and technology or community to of demonstrating appropriately beneficiaries. culture. Involve equipment, and assume ownership significant change for their work to Collaborate withmultiple community train them to of the project for at least three ensure continuity local agencies/ partners in the operate, maintain, once global grant years. of services. organizations to planning process. and repair it on funds are fully supply expertise, their own. expended. as needed. Implementation Planning Reporting Global Grant Timeline
    56. 56. TheRotary Foundation
    57. 57. The Rotary Foundation Bill Griffin Lee Phares Assistant RRFC, Zone Assistant RRFC, Zone 34 34 District 6970 Kenan Kern District 6990 Russ MillerAssistant RRFC, Zone 34 District 6920 Assistant RRFC, Zone 34 District 6950
    58. 58. THE Peter DeBergeROTARYFOUNDATION
    59. 59. THE Robert HallROTARY Zone 34 End Polio Now CoordinatorFOUNDATION Rotary International District 6900 Governor 2001-2002
    60. 60. Polio Eradication is our legacy & so are they
    61. 61. Rotary’s #1 PriorityKeeping our promise isKey to our Membership Key to our Brand
    62. 62. Rotary Chose This Fight
    63. 63. No New Global Project until Polio Eradication is Completed
    64. 64. Committed to aPolio-Free World
    65. 65. IndiaPolio virus transmission interrupted as of 25 Feb 2012
    66. 66. We Made a Difference!
    67. 67. Nigeria95% reduction in polio cases from2009 to 2010
    68. 68. AfghanistanAccessing difficult areas
    69. 69. PakistanImproving surveillanceRenewing commitment
    70. 70. Where are we today?Only 3 countries where the wild polio virus has not been interrupted. Pakistan - Afghanistan - Nigeria Year to date Worldwide: 64 Cases June 2, 2012 181 Cases June 2, 2011 650 Cases in 2011 1352 cases in 2010
    71. 71. ROTARY’S CHALLENGE NOWTO REMAIN FOCUSED ON OUR GOAL OF WORLDWIDE POLIO ERADICATION.
    72. 72. What can we Rotarians do?• Create public awareness and encourage support from government and private sector donors• Financial support – give if you have not given• Tell our children• Encourage and support Rotarians in polio affected and high-risk countries• Highlight the need for strong surveillance• Promote routine immunization
    73. 73. THESE MEN AGREE, WE MUST
    74. 74. Please Join Us for theRotary International Convention in Beautiful Lisboa, Portugal June 23 - 26, 2013
    75. 75. THE Peter DoetschmanROTARY Planned Giving OfficerFOUNDATION The Rotary Foundation
    76. 76. Major and Planned Gifts 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 87
    77. 77. Identify Cultivate Solicit Thank 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 88
    78. 78. • Gifts that benefit The Rotary Foundation’s Permanent Fund after the donor’s death• Testamentary Gift Options: • Benefactor • Bequest Society • Making a gift of Life Insurance 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 89
    79. 79. • A Benefactor is an individual or couple that has made a provision in their estate plan, or made an outright gift of $1,000 to the Permanent Fund. 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 90
    80. 80. A Bequest Society member is an individual or couple that has made a provision in their estate plan to gift a minimum $10,000 to TRF.2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 91
    81. 81. • Charitable Gift Annuity• Deferred Charitable Gift Annuity• Charitable Remainder Trust 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 92
    82. 82. • US$100,000: One Area of Focus via Global Grants• US$250,000: One Area of Focus + district designation• US$500,000: One Area of Focus and geographic region• US$1,000,000+: Tailored to match donor interest CULTIVATE ASK 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 93
    83. 83. • Major Gift Initiative - US$95 million goal• Endowed and Term Gifts• Multiple Naming Opportunities 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 94
    84. 84. Arch C. Klumph Bequest Society Major Donor SocietyUS$1 Million + Foundation Circle Level Seven$500,000 to $999,999 Chair’s Circle Level Six$250,000 to $499,999 Trustee’s Circle Level Five$100,000 to $249,999 Level Four Level Four$50,000 to $99,999 Level Three Level Three$25,000 to $49,999 Level Two Level Two$10,000 to $24,999 Level One Level One 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 95
    85. 85. Annual Fund CULTIVATE ASKMajor gifts CULTIVATE ASKArch C. Klumph Society CULTIVATE ASK 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 96
    86. 86. • Debra Lowe Major Gifts Officer, Zone 34• Joanne Bertsche Annual Giving Officer, Zones 33 and 34• Peter Doetschman Planned Giving Officer 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 97
    87. 87. • Lead by example• Work as a team• Educate• Ask• Thank 2012 Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Institute 98
    88. 88. THEROTARY Steve LyonsFOUNDATION SHARE System Senior Coordinator 
    89. 89. SHARE How can our district spend the DDF?PAST PRESENT FUTURE
    90. 90. SHARE When do we start spending the district’s 2013-14 DDF?JUL 2012 JAN 2013 JUL 2013 AUG 2013 JUN 20142013-14 Submit Donation FormsSHARE Kit Complete Qualification Begin Applying for District and Global Grants Receive Carry Forward Amount
    91. 91. SHAREWhere does the district’s unspent DDF from 2012-13 go? 2012-13 2013-14
    92. 92. SHARE How can our district spend the DDF?PAST PRESENT FUTURE
    93. 93. THEROTARY Candice EmblingFOUNDATION TRF Packaged Grants manager The Rotary Foundation
    94. 94. Packaged Global Grants Overview Agenda• What are packaged grants?• Why does TRF offer packaged grants?• What are the current packaged grant opportunities?• How are packaged grants funded?
    95. 95. Grant Types in Future VisionDistrict Grants Global Grants Packaged Grants
    96. 96. Why Package?• Demonstration projects• Visibility/Promotion with other global organizations• Involvement opportunity for clubs – with limited resources – with lack of familiarity with TRF
    97. 97. What are Strategic Partners?• NGOs, universities, corporations• Global scope of work• Expertise in an Area of Focus• Formal relationship to secure resources• Enhance Rotarians’ service opportunities• Lead to Packaged Grants
    98. 98. What are Packaged Grants?• Opportunities for Rotary clubs and districts• Pre-designed projects funded by the World Fund and the strategic partner, no DDF or cash required• Can include scholarships, humanitarian projects, and vocational training• Rotarians can focus their talents and energies on implementation
    99. 99. Developing Local Entrepreneurs: Oikocredit • Connection between local Rotary clubs and microfinance institutions • Training activities – humanitarian projects • Currently available in India, the Philippines, and Uruguay • Economic and Community Development Area of Focus
    100. 100. Nursing Scholarships/Training Health Educators: Aga Khan University• Activities take place at 3 campuses: Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania• Scholarships and Vocational Training Teams (2 separate opportunities)• Maternal and Child Health Area of Focus
    101. 101. Medical Service and Training:Mercy Ships• Activities related to the Africa Mercy• Upcoming ports in Togo and Guinea• Vocational Training Teams• Disease Prevention and Treatment Area of Focus
    102. 102. Water Scholarships: UNESCO-IHE• Scholars will study in the Netherlands• Focus on building long- term connections in the student’s home country• Water & Sanitation Area of Focus
    103. 103. Questions?
    104. 104. THE Jeremy HurstROTARY Governor 2013-2014 Rotary International District 7020FOUNDATION
    105. 105. Update on District 7020’sTransition Plan for a Non - Pilot District
    106. 106. District 7020 – overview• 2650± Rotarians• 84 Clubs• 10 Countries• 16 Islands• 3 languages• 1300 Miles• 1 day travel time
    107. 107. District 7020 – Challenges• Diversity – Population, Economics, Socially, Language.• Clubs with 10 to 100+ members.• Small Islands to Substantial Countries• Extreme Wealth to Dire Poverty• Natural Disasters…….. Builds strength and resilience.
    108. 108. District 7020 - Strengths• CHALLENGES:Logistical, Geographical,Climatic, Organisational, Financial,• OPPORTUNITIES:To serve – need greater organisation,communication and planning.• STRENGTHS:Strong Organisational structure, Cohesive Leadership SuccessionPlanning. Vibrant Clubs.Dedicated, passionate Rotarians delivering great Rotary service.• Dedicated to supporting The Rotary Foundation
    109. 109. District 7020 – TRF Support• Annual Programs Fund 2007/8 $332,854 2008/9 $161,320 2009/10 $264,000 2010/11 $253,543• 134 PHS Members since 2006 • 64 Major Donors• PolioPlus Challenge - $382,693.79 raised to date• Permanent Fund• 138 Benefactors • 30 Bequest Society Members• NIDs in India • GSE Teams• Ambassadorial & Peace Scholarships
    110. 110. District 7020 – TRF Support• Matching Grants $819,407 in 2009-10 $1,143,726 in 2010-11• Competitive Matching Grants $427,345 - 2009-2011• Haiti Update• Over $2.2m DAF leveraged to $6.5m• More than 80 projects• No funds used for Administration• District 7020 donated $750k• TRF 45 Matching Grants totaling $1.49m• Coordinated over $18m of donated supplies “OUR FOUNDATION IS AN ESSENTIAL COMPONENT OF DISTRICT 7020 ROTARY”
    111. 111. District 7020 – Goals • Ensure success of existing TRF programmes whilst implementing Future Vision - in parallel. • Dedicate the necessary resources – but not to the detriment of current TRF programmes. • e.g., Haiti etc. - remain focused and effective. • Build general awareness - buy in - SELL BENEFITS. • Ramp up to & ensure Seamless Changeover - 7/1/13. • Future Vision Implementation Team/Plan/Structure.
    112. 112. ImplementationPreparing the way….• Align activities with the areas of focus• Develop relationship with pilot district• Build district Rotary Foundation committee• Stay updated on grant reporting• Start planning for grant management training and qualification• Use webinars and resource materials
    113. 113. ImplementationDemystify – what changes / stays same?• New Grant Model• Global Grants - District Grants (+ Packaged Grants)• DDF allocation to Global and District Funds• VTTs (no GSEs but better)• Scholarships as Grants• New way of doing TRF Business• Needs Assessment • More local control• Sustainability • Stewardship / Audit• Measurability & Accountability• Member Access as Gateway• Seven Areas of Focus
    114. 114. Seven Areas of Focus Rum Tasting Peace and Conflict Resolution Disease Prevention and Treatment Water and Sanitation Maternal and Child Health Basic Education and Literacy Economic and Community Development
    115. 115. Six Areas of Focus Peace and Conflict Resolution Disease Prevention and Treatment Water and Sanitation Maternal and Child Health Basic Education and Literacy Economic and Community Development
    116. 116. District 7020 – 2011-14 FV Plan• Four year plan• 2010-11• Appoint District FV Chair• Build awareness• High level training• Develop District Implementation Plan• 2011-12• District Chair appoints FVACs.• Steering Committee decides procedures• FVACs trained• Clubs appoint FV Chairs• Prepare resources - PowerPoints, Timelines
    117. 117. District 7020 – FV Plan 2011-14• Four year plan• 2012-13• FVACs and Club FV Chairs Educate & train clubs Newsletters, Webinars, Website, E-learning• Club Certification (100% Goal) March 31st 2013 Attend Grant Management Seminar Sign Club MoU Close off /fully report on all open Grants• Apply for District/Global Grants – 1st quarter 2013• District Certification – Sign District MOU• 2013-14 …… HIT THE GROUND RUNNING
    118. 118. D7020 Organisational Structure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` !" - 9,!%& ( 7H ! ! G % . . 20&<H C6 3= 7D, ?M C?M >= A&77?E= 7?>G 3, &H ) 4454* L ) 48549G DA6 . * * 20: ; "#<H . S " I AFAT A> &ABT AD U A=A AT @ $&" ! + 6 - & !# 7. + + !: - . ; 07& ( 89 )! ! ,+ < =!>)9??/! ! @ + 0&/!AB- ( /! ! " - )&CD!E F+ 9- !!!!" - 9,!%& ( !!!!!! + G 7H I - ( + - D J<7& /! /!* ? $ + /!@ ?+ +!( ! ! ,, 7& ( ! K+ F/ L!@ ( C+ 7! ! ( - ( ! ! ! ! !M I & B7& - B ( ! ! ! ! ! <A== 6 #= R AA?6 D D6 M / #3" I 3" , DK Q C=Q A : 7? & N & )!K ! ! ! 6 - & ,,+ !M ( & ! C - L! # 7( !@ ( F, & ! 0- ! : L- ( !$ ,9D! ! ! > L. 79& 7FN ! !M @ , ?!K9C+ ( ! - ! ! O !M & 7( - )!! ! : 7N & 0+ !P !# - B+ !* ) F!% CD! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! . 3, &Y M 7D>= === >ZE )) ( F!* ?+ - &!# + + - F & ; !- ( F!" AI >!I & + + N!+ !Y5ZZXZYW >% >W J Q M 6 ( R /)&C)!K /0+ - ( ( ( !ZYXZ] !I & + !@ - ( ,9?! 1 + & !<S !- ( F!I : <! 1 C /_ @ + /R AV !I AV !E//+ ,9?!@ & 1C- )+ !H + 0- & !" /!P /W /)!@ )+ + 7( )0!E 9F+ 7. . + W /)!+ !; & ; - & )+ !71 + + )!@ )) !E//+ ( - 7( !# /)&C)!P !$ ,7?- ,!$ & ( )!; & 7/- ,/!P !- ; ; ,+ )+ /W - 7; C- 7( !! ! &Q . C6 3= 7D&FA= &. 3&H ) 4454* L 548Q A/R " /!7& " " /U - + !H + ! CJ C?M >= ?>G * 4* " !S !T !K+ / )0!<S E@/!P !@ V ,9?!: <@/R 1C & ( F!C,9?!. V !71 + /!- . ? & /!! )7!)& + !- ( F!- C)!- /!- !C,9?!& /79& W 77& ( - ) !@ - ( C !@ F+ ,9?!@ & 1C- )+ !- ( F!- //+ ( !; & ; - & )+ !- ( F!1 )+ + 7( /)!+ - 7( 7,,7H !9; !71 + + !# /)&C)X$ ,7?- ,!$ & ( )!" & // /W - 7C
    119. 119. District 7020 – Grant Procedures• District Grants Committee Chair, DG, DGE, DRFC Largest $ APF gross and per capita Largest % increase in APF• 2013 – 2014 District Grants Maximum 50% of DDF Up to 9 projects of approx US$5,000 DDF = US$45,000 Reserve, District Project, GSE or other = US$20,000• Eligibility• Club certified annually• Up to date with their District and RI dues• No unreported or delinquent TRF Grants• All members give something to TRF• Criteria• Need assessment • Merit • Sustainability • Measurability• Alignment w/ District and RI Goals & Six Areas of Focus• Size and impact • Cash contribution
    120. 120. ImplementationWebinars playing a vital role….• Attend RI - TRF Training Webinars• District Steering Committee Communication• Training for Future Vision Area Coordinators• Preparation for District Meetings – DLT/PETS• Future Vision Grant Management Seminars• Develop new 7020 Foundation Website
    121. 121. ImplementationNew D7020 Foundation Websiterotaryfoundation7020.org• Developed withPilot Mentor District6970 - via Webinar• Working oninterface withmatchinggrants.orgto manage:- Grant applications- Document retention- Reporting/Audit Trail
    122. 122. On JULY 1st 2013 The Future Vision of The Rotary Foundation becomesOur Rotary Foundation. ONLY 393 DAYS FROM TODAY.
    123. 123. THE Garland MooreROTARY District 6910 Future Vision Transition Team ChairFOUNDATION Rotary International District 6910 Governor 2008-2009
    124. 124. The Rotary Foundation Dianne Garland Moore Cammarata District 6910 District 6910 DRFC Chair Future Vision Alan Smith RICH PANYIKTransition Team Chair District 6910 District 6910 Permanent Fund Transition Team Chair Vice Chair
    125. 125. THE RICH PANYIKROTARY District 6910 Permanent Fund ChairFOUNDATION RRFC, Zone 34, 2004-2007 Rotary International District 6910 Governor 1999-2000
    126. 126. THE Dianne CammarataROTARY DRFC Chair 6910FOUNDATION Rotary International District 6910 Governor 2005-2006 
    127. 127. THE Alan SmithROTARY District 6910 Future Vision Transition Team Vice ChairFOUNDATION Assistant District Governor Rotary International District 6910
    128. 128. THE Sally PlattROTARY Rotary International District 6900 Grants ChairFOUNDATION

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