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National Volunteering Forum - October 2019 - Leeds - employer-supported volunteering

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National Volunteering Forum - October 2019 - Leeds - employer-supported volunteering

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National Volunteering Forum - October 2019 - Leeds - employer-supported volunteering

  1. 1. NATIONAL VOLUNTEERING FORUM EMPLOYER-SUPPORTED VOLUNTEERING: THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE WAY FORWARD 10.00 – 16.00 23 October @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  2. 2. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum WELCOME!
  3. 3. SHAUN DELANEY VOLUNTEERING DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, NCVO @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  4. 4. TWITTER: @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  5. 5. VÉRONIQUE JOCHUM HEAD OF RESEARCH, NCVO @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  6. 6. LEARNINGS FROM TIME WELL SPENT: EMPLOYER-SUPPORTED VOLUNTEERING NVF 23.10.19
  7. 7. BACKGROUND TO THE RESEARCH
  8. 8. • National survey (GB, 18+) 10,103 respondents • Volunteering through groups, clubs, organisations • YouGov’s panel, via online self- completion questionnaire • Informed by stakeholder engagement • Recent, former volunteers and non-volunteers • Employer- supported volunteering • Public services • Diversity …and more Reports focusing on key themes TIME WELL SPENT - A FOCUSED LOOK AT KEY THEMES
  9. 9. • bring together latest evidence on employer-supported volunteering (ESV) and build on previous research • capture the different perspectives of volunteers, employers, volunteer-involving organisations and intermediaries • inform practice and policy, considering key opportunities for the future in this area. OUR AIMS & OBJECTIVES ESV definition: Volunteering where employers actively support or have schemes for employees to give unpaid help to a group, club or organisation either by giving them time during working hours or organising volunteering activities for them. We are not referring to schemes for giving money.
  10. 10. OUR APPROACH ES V Volunteer s Employe rs Charities Brokers Further Time Well Spent analysis Workshop, (1), telephone interviews (7), written feedback (4) Telephone interviews (6), written feedback (10) Further primary research with key audiences Time Well Spent findings Incl. CVN Report (2018) Round table with stakeholders Time Well Spent report Review of key evidence Stakeholder s – employers, brokers and charities Workshop (1), written feedback (9)
  11. 11. CONTEXT OF ESV
  12. 12. • 10% of recent volunteers have taken part in ESV in the last 12 months as their main volunteering Base: All recent volunteers (3,898) – main organisation (if more than one) ESV MAKES UP A SMALL PART OF VOLUNTEERING, BUT SOME PERCEIVE AN INCREASED DEMAND IN THIS AREA • In 2015-16, the Community Life Survey reported no change in the proportion of ESV compared with 2014- 15 and 2013-14 (8%), though levels are higher than in 2012-13 (6%) • ….but some perceive an increased demand in this area in recent years
  13. 13. THERE ARE DIFFERENT FORMS OF ESV • 5% during their work hours, organised by their employer • 7% outside of their work hours but organised by their employer • 10% during working hours and given time to participate, not organised by their employer • ‘Set’ charity partnerships • Variety / ad hoc charities • Charities of individuals’ choosing • Larger groups • Smaller groups • Individuals • Use of brokers • Direct relationshi p with charities Base: All recent volunteers (3,898) – main organisation (if more than one) • In a set team and dedicate d role • Ad hoc, addition to role
  14. 14. Wanting to make a differenc e Volunteer-involving organisations Employers Volunteers Other motivations include:  Connection with a specific organisation or cause  Being asked to help  Using or gaining skills Other motivations include: • Benefits to employees (eg staff development, positive work environment • Benefit to employer (eg enhanced reputation, increased productivity) Other motivations include: • Access to financial contributions and skills • Supporting development of partnerships Brokers Brokers Brokers THERE IS A COMMON GOAL – BUT THE DIFFERENT GROUPS INVOLVED CREATES COMPLEXITY
  15. 15. EXPERIENCE OF ESV
  16. 16. ESV VOLUNTEERS ARE POSITIVE OVERALL ABOUT THEIR EXPERIENCE 91% very or fairly satisfied had or would recommend it to family or friends76% 76% likely to continue in the next 12 months Base: All ESV volunteers (367) – main organisation (if more than one)
  17. 17. THEY FEEL A RANGE OF BENEFITS FROM TAKING PART – SIMILAR TO OTHER VOLUNTEERS 58 58 65 71 74 76 77 82 83 83 83 84 It improves my employment prospects It improves my physical health It helps me feel less isolated It improves my mental health and wellbeing It gives me more confidence It gives me new skills and experience It brings me into contact with people from different backgrounds and cultures I meet new people It broadens my experience of life I enjoy it It gives me a sense of personal achievement It makes me feel I am making a difference Base: All ESV volunteers (367) – main organisation (if more than one)
  18. 18. “We get overwhelming positive feedback from ESV volunteers and they usually say they'd like to come again after their first one off experience. We…talk about our campaigns and how people can continue to support us. ESVs are always very engaged…people often ask questions…I think it's successful because we don't make it feel like work - we say thank you a lot, we tweet during the day with photos, we send thank you cards afterwards and we provide some drinks and snacks” MANY ORGANISATIONS CITE POSITIVE EXPERIENCES THAT RESONATE WITH HIGH SATISFACTION LEVELS
  19. 19. COMPARED WITH NON-ESV VOLUNTEERS, ESV VOLUNTEERS ARE LESS POSITIVE 91% 39% 52% Satisfied Very satisfied Fairly satisfied Non-ESV Base: All ESV volunteers (367) – main organisation (if more than one) All non-ESV volunteers (3498) – main organisation (if more than one) – excl. those who have never had 96% 56% 41% ESV
  20. 20. 2 1 I expected the process of getting involved to be quicker Things could be much better organised It was becoming too much like paid work I felt recognised enough for the help I gave Base: All ESV volunteers (367) – main organisation (if more than one) All non-ESV volunteers (3498) – main organisation (if more than one) – excl. those who have never had 4 1 5 1 3 2 7 The group/ club/ organisation was flexible around the time I give 1 2 3 1 6 1 0 9 % agree - ESV % agree – non ESV % disagree - ESV % disagree – non ESV THIS CAN ALSO BE SEEN ACROSS DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF THE VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE
  21. 21. ORGANISATIONS ALSO ACKNOWLEDGE REASONS THERE MAY BE LESS POSITIVE VIEWS • Involvement of employers means less flexibility • Employees may apply ‘work’ expectations to their volunteering • There may be limited scope for meaningful and impactful volunteering when it’s often short term (one Examples where ESV worked less well included those with: o Large groups o Not skilled in the area o Resource heavy o Low impact o Inflexible o Short notice o Not well organised
  22. 22. PREPARING ESV FOR THE FUTURE
  23. 23. THE YEARS AHEAD ARE LIKELY TO COME WITH A NUMBER OF CHANGES (AND CHALLENGES) LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE…. Higher expectations placed on employers are likely to drive ESV forward Research participants expected ESV to increase in the next years The financial climate is likely to get tougher ESV may evolve in new and innovative ways
  24. 24. THERE ARE A NUMBER OF QUESTIONS THAT MIGHT HELP US PREPARE… 1. How might we better engage volunteers? 2. How might we make ESV more inclusive? 3. How might we create a more positive ESV culture? 4. How might organisations involved in ESV work better together? 5. How might we make ESV more impactful?
  25. 25. 1. HOW MIGHT WE BETTER ENGAGE VOLUNTEERS IN ESV?
  26. 26. CURRENT UPTAKE AND FUTURE INTEREST IN ESV ARE LOW Barriers Low awareness / encouragement Not really understanding what it’s about Thinking they don’t have something to offer Time and work pressures Need to ‘justify’ Type of role – unpredictable 10% of all Time Well Spent survey respondents were interested in future opportunities to volunteer that were ‘supported or encouraged by their employer’
  27. 27. VOLUNTEERS NEED TO FEEL THAT IT’S EASY TO PARTICIPATE AND MEANINGFUL TO THEM •Making it as easy and flexible as possible to take part • Flexible arrangements and flexibility about how time is taken Making it more ‘personal’ • Volunteers feel they have freely chosen to participate in causes that are meaningful to them • Volunteers feel prepared for their volunteering activities, are actively involved in shaping opportunities or supported to find their own Investing in building relationships with volunteers • Volunteer-involving organisations and employers invest the same time and effort into relationships with volunteers, as they do with one another • ESV volunteers may not initially look for long-term involvement but where engaged effectively, they can go on to be involved in different and more impactful ways
  28. 28. HOW MIGHT WE MAKE ESV MORE INCLUSIVE?
  29. 29. ESV CAN FEEL LIKE IT’S FOR LARGER ORGANISATIONS AND FOR SKILLED VOLUNTEERS While SMEs and smaller volunteer-involving organisations could benefit from being involved in ESV, it is an area dominated by larger organisations on both sides: Additionally, for some employees, ESV can feel exclusive – especially for skills-based opportunities. Time Well Spent: Those who worked for an employer and were aware of ESV opportunities were more likely to work for an employer with 250+ employees - the highest proportion were those working for an employer with over 1000 employees (37%) CVN survey: 80% of organisations with more than 50 employees had engaged in ESV vs 51% of volunteer-involving organisations with up to 5 employees
  30. 30. FOR ESV TO BE MORE INCLUSIVE, MORE NEEDS TO BE DONE ‘OUTSIDE THE BOX’ 2. adopting a wider definition of skills and experiences - recognising and valuing a broader range of skills and experiences 1. ensuring a broad range of opportunities are on offer - employers recognise that volunteering should meet different needs and preferences 3. recognising the unique contribution of smaller organisations and making ESV more ‘small friendly’ – SMEs and smaller volunteer-involving organisations have unique advantages but more needs to be done to ensure they can participate
  31. 31. HOW MIGHT WE CREATE A MORE POSITIVE ESV CULTURE?
  32. 32. INTERNAL CHALLENGES WITHIN ORGANISATIONS CAN BE THE BIGGEST BARRIER TO MOVING FORWARD • Not always in roles dedicated to ESV • Sometimes not sitting within a specific team or not consistently in a particular team • Variable situations in relation to budget / charging • Budget not always in their control or don’t have any (employer) • Some charge, others don’t (charities, brokers) • Challenges for some in getting buy-in of others within own organisation (understanding its value) • Not necessarily linked to a strategy / wider part of business Time and resource Budget Buy in
  33. 33. A POSITIVE CULTURE REQUIRES EMBEDDING ESV IN DIFFERENT WAYS THROUGHOUT THE ORGANISATION Having ESV champions at different levels – while a committed lead is essential in driving ESV forward, wider buy-in is needed to support ESV Promoting values and benefits – regular communication internally and celebrating the difference volunteers make can help boost the profile of ESV Ensuring ESV is joined up to other parts of the organisation – this may help to ensure ESV has a ‘place’ and purpose in the organisation.
  34. 34. HOW MIGHT ORGANISATIONS INVOLVED IN ESV WORK BETTER TOGETHER?
  35. 35. A MISMATCH OF NEEDS AND EXPECTATIONS CAN CREATE BARRIERS TO EFFECTIVE ESV RELATIONSHIPS • Relationships are impacted by individual needs and priorities, which can pull organisations in different directions • Cost is an area of tension but there may be more than just employers not being willing to pay for ESV • Some ‘translation’ is needed to bridge the gap between volunteer-involving organisations and employers – this requires time and resource EmployersVolunteer-involving organisations
  36. 36. AN OPEN, HONEST AND ADAPTIVE APPROACH IS NEEDED FOR SUCCESSFUL RELATIONSHIPS Working better together by: • recognising one size does not fit all – being open to different partnership models, with support from brokers • having honest, upfront communications – being clearer about what works and having the confidence to say no • being willing to adapt – understanding the employer context can help build more effective relationships EmployersVolunteer-involving organisations
  37. 37. HOW MIGHT WE MAKE ESV MORE IMPACTFUL?
  38. 38. VOLUNTEERING OPPORTUNITIES ARE NOT AS IMPACTFUL AS THEY COULD BE • Volunteering opportunities of most benefit to volunteer-involving organisations are not those most popular among employers • Many requests for resource-heavy, low-impact volunteering, especially among employers new to ESV • Volunteering is often equated with team-building • Measures of success focus primarily on numbers of volunteers, not impact • Not all employees want to or feel they have work-based skills to offer • Around the same % of ESV volunteers prefer using skills and experience that are different to what they do day-to-day (eg in work or study) as the same ones (40% vs 42%)
  39. 39. MAXIMISING IMPACT REQUIRES ACTION AT DIFFERENT LEVELS Promoting a greater understanding of volunteering Focusing on shared values Recognising that impacts can be realised in different wayRethinking measures of success
  40. 40. CONCLUSIONS
  41. 41. KEY LEARNINGS Volunteer experience Shared value and purpose Internal and external relationships What could organisations managing and delivering ESV consider for the future?
  42. 42. THANK YOU Amy McGarvey, Research Manager amy.mcgarvey@ncvo.org.uk Report is available at: www.ncvo.org.uk/timewellspent Including a table of questions to consider Look out for our next report on volunteering in the public sector (November 2019)
  43. 43. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum Q&A
  44. 44. ROUNDTABLE • How might we better engage volunteers in ESV? • How might we make ESV more inclusive? • How might we make ESV more impactful?
  45. 45. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum BREAK
  46. 46. THERRI TAIT PARTNERSHIPS MANAGER, YOUNG CITIZENS @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  47. 47. Young Citizens Skills-Based Volunteering: Maximise Your Impact Therri Tait, Partnerships Manager
  48. 48. • National education charity established in 1989 • Works within the remit of citizenship education • We train teachers, we create classroom resources and we run active learning programmes • Annually, we reach over 250,000 young people across the UK • Partner with over 50 corporate partners About Young Citizens
  49. 49. We partner with businesses to utilise the unique skills and expertise of their employees in the classroom. Working with volunteers is central to our organisational strategy Two main ways we work with businesses: • Experts in Schools • Bespoke Programmes Partnering with corporates
  50. 50. There are 3 branches to our Experts in Schools programme: Legal, Economic and Media Project Delivery: • The business is partnered with a local school • We train the volunteers and create the materials used in the classroom • Volunteers work with small groups of young people to facilitate debate and discussion Experts in Schools
  51. 51. We create unique educational programmes that align with the CSR and business objectives of the businesses. Examples: • Allen & Overy • CC Land Bespoke Programmes
  52. 52. • Upskilled employees – reported increase in facilitation, leadership and communication skills • Internal and external networking opportunity • Increase in personal and job satisfaction The Benefits – Volunteers “It’s a brilliant opportunity to work with children who inspire you and make you think differently about your job. It stops you taking work for granted and makes you realise how interesting the law actually is.” - Heloise Waudby, Volunteer, McDermott Will & Emery
  53. 53. • High quality programme where Young Citizens brokers the relationship • Makes a real difference in their local community • Business development opportunities • Helps businesses to meet their CSR and business objectives The Benefit – Businesses “The best thing about working with Young Citizens is that we feel confident we are making a significant impact and that it answers a real need that young people have.” - Kirsty Christie, Head of Corporate Citizenship, FTI Consulting
  54. 54. Thank you
  55. 55. TINA SHELTON REGIONAL CITIZENS IN POLICING COORDINATOR, NORTH WEST POLICE FORCES @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  56. 56. EMPLOYER SUPPORTED POLICING Tina Shelton Regional Citizens in Policing Coordinator North West Police Forces
  57. 57. What Is Employer Supported Policing? – A national scheme owned by the Home Office – A partnership benefitting employers, their staff and the police service – A scheme whereby organisations give additional paid leave to their staff who are Special Constables and/or Police Support Volunteers
  58. 58. What is a Special Constable? Local volunteer that form a vital link between communities and the police service, and carry out duties that improve public safety and increase confidence. Special Constables: • Have full police powers • Wear the same uniform, equipment, and have same responsibilities as a paid officer • Bound by Police Regulations and Policing Code of Ethics
  59. 59. What is a Police Support Volunteer? Police Support Volunteers undertake roles to support and enhance the day-to-day work undertaken by police officers and staff. They: • Undertake a variety of roles to help address policing issues • Enhance service delivery • Focus on proactive prevention and strengthen links between policing and the community Karen is a Police Support Volunteer for Lincolnshire Police who is supported by her employer - G4S. They give up to nine days' paid leave to volunteer under the Employer Supported Policing Scheme.
  60. 60. ESP Data The Scale of ESP: • 310 employers supporting policing – 169 other ESP registered employers – 141 in-house schemes • 43 Police Forces have internal ESP Policy • 1,381 Special Constables (approximately one in eight) • ESP Manager Module – DutySheet – ESP Toolkit & Guidance for Forces
  61. 61. Benefits of Employer Supported Policing for Employers ESP Impact Report 2019: • Skills, experience and new perspectives brought back into the business • Increases confidence of employees • Enhances reputation and profile • Contributes to morale and retention of employees • Can help in employees progressing and seeking promotion at work
  62. 62. Benefits of Employer Supported Policing for Employees/Special Constables • Increased participation, hours and confidence as a Special • Contributes to retention • Helps in work-life balance / wellbeing • Helps employees feel supported in what they do • Able to volunteer at different times, often assisting in accessing training and other opportunities to develop as a Special Constable • Particularly helpful in supporting longer-serving, ‘career’ Special Constables Special Constable Karl Smyth – Trafford Council says, “My paid job as a Social Care Assessor enables me share my professional knowledge with policing colleagues which in turn helps support policing in the community. In return I have developed lots of new skills, such as resilience and leadership which I can take back into my paid work place.”
  63. 63. Benefits of Employer Supported Policing Employer Supported Policing is an effective and powerful way for organisations to invest in their people and the local community. But… there are challenges…
  64. 64. Challenges • Communication • Variation in Force ‘buy in’ and practice • Balancing flexibility and consistency • To be better at actively engaging with employers, including reward & recognition • Resourcing, including gaps in regional and national coordination
  65. 65. The Future New ESP National Strategy Vision To ensure Employer Supported Policing is attractive to employers and volunteers and is valuable to the Police Service and communities. Mission To ensure that Employer Supported Policing is an effective partnership benefiting employers, their staff and the Police Service by supporting Special Constables and Police Support Volunteers with additional paid leave to allow them to volunteer in the community to increase public safety and confidence. Priorities • Develop ESP • Raising the Profile of ESP • Broadening the remit of ESP
  66. 66. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum Q&A
  67. 67. PETE TATHAM PROJECT COORDINATOR, HYDE PARK SOURCE @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  68. 68. Pete Tatham – Project Coordinator ESV as a cultural exchange
  69. 69. What is Hyde Park Source? Est 1998 We aim to improve people’s health and wellbeing through improving the environment of local areas. We are committed to increasing the potential of individuals and communities – promoting equality of education and training.
  70. 70. We work with 300+ ‘ESV’ Volunteers each year across approx. 30 projects. Mostly Design and Build projects. Group sizes from 2-40. Lots of bank and building societies, also lots of other type of businesses. Some through ‘brokers’ VAL & Benefacto lots through direct links built over the years. Lots of repeat groups.
  71. 71. Group Dynamics Work Ethos Mixed Groups Information on projects
  72. 72. Why Cultural Exchange? What’s different? Questions we get asked. A question of values? Is it meaningful? What can HPS learn?
  73. 73. More focus on wellbeing of staff from all sectors Benefits from volunteering days Ongoing connections
  74. 74. pete@hydeparksource.org www.hydeparksource.org Sign up to our quarterly newsletter, Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram.
  75. 75. JONATHAN WILLIAMS OFFICE AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, FARESHARE YORKSHIRE @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  76. 76. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum Q&A
  77. 77. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum LUNCH & NETWORKING
  78. 78. IAN ALLARD SENIOR SUSTAINABILITY MANAGER, MACE GROUP LTD @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  79. 79. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Building Sustainable Cities - How Mace uses volunteering to change communities Ian Allard
  80. 80. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Wellbeing & Opportunity Education, employment and skills Why do we volunteer?
  81. 81. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Wellbeing & Opportunity Responsible procurement Why do we volunteer? Staff wellbeing In 2015: 43 workplace accident deaths & 454 construction suicides Construction workers are 10 times more likely to commit suicide at a rate of 2 per working day**
  82. 82. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Wellbeing & Opportunity Responsible procurement Why do we volunteer? Staff retention & attraction
  83. 83. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Wellbeing & Opportunity Responsible procurement Waste Generated Carbon Emissions (Built Environment) Carbon Emissions (Construction) 42% 349m t 55% 317m t 5.8% 48m t 59% 120m t Material Consumption Why do we volunteer? Environmental impact
  84. 84. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Wellbeing & Opportunity Education, employment and skills Volunteering that makes a difference Meaningful, engaging volunteering in three key areas Maintaining green spaces Education and encouraging the next generation - Coopers Lane Station – A tube carriage turned library Long lasting community improvement - A pop-up park built by Mace Volunteers
  85. 85. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Wellbeing & Opportunity Education, employment and skills Long-Lasting Community Improvement KIDS Charity Playground 100 volunteers from local projects spent 3 weeks refurbishing the playground Rewired and repainted the community centre, offer parents a vital support space The only space for children physical and mental challenges in the borough Local supply chain donated over £60,000 of materials and skills
  86. 86. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Wellbeing & Opportunity Connect, learn and innovate Creating Green Spaces for People and Wildlife Mace encourages staff to help us achieve our target of adding 25% biodiversity Our partnership with the Canals and Rivers Trust and local Wildlife Trusts have allowed our volunteers to contribute to the creation of a new green community spaces around our projects 2 new parks opened in G. London 1 Bird Observation Hide built 1 new sensory garden for SEN Children
  87. 87. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Wellbeing & Opportunity Education, employment and skills Innovative & Inspiring Education Projects Coopers Lane Station Project, in partnership with Transport for London created a new library in a London Mace Science & Engineering Club offer after-school club support to local schools Careers days, site visits and industry talks encourage students to get into the sector
  88. 88. Mace Information Handling Classification: Unrestricted/Restricted/Confidential delete as appropriate in Slide Master 1 Classification - Public Wellbeing & Opportunity Occupational wellbeing and quality of workspace What we achieved in 2018 Almost half of Mace staff participated Over 21,000hours of volunteering in 2018 2019???
  89. 89. ALEX WILLUMSEN COMMUNITY AND ENGAGEMENT OFFICER, SOUTHERN WATER @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  90. 90. More in common than divides us National Volunteering Forum
  91. 91. 1 0
  92. 92. 1 0
  93. 93. 1 0  We want to make a difference  We want to do something meaningful  We care about our community/customers/service-users  We have targets to meet  We don’t have much time  We need to be flexible
  94. 94. 1 0  The person who looks after the volunteers only works on Wednesday  We don’t have a budget  We feel lonely, isolated and stressed  We don’t want to be a burden  We have more to offer
  95. 95. Where do we go from here? 1 1  Get to know your local businesses  Think creatively  Align values  Match up needs  Be prepared  Think long-term  Capture testimonials  Use social media
  96. 96. Where do we go from here? 1 1  Get to know your local businesses  Think creatively  Align values  Match up needs  Be prepared  Think long-term  Capture testimonials  Use social media  Be realistic
  97. 97. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum Q&A
  98. 98. ROUNDTABLE • How might we create a more positive ESV culture in organisations? • How can organisations involved in ESV work better together?
  99. 99. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum BREAK
  100. 100. GARY BLAKE SUPPORTING ORGANISATIONS MANAGER, VOLUNTARY ACTION LEEDS @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  101. 101. Our Experiences and Challenges of Developing an Employer Supported Volunteering (ESV) Project Gary Blake: Voluntary Action Leeds (VAL)
  102. 102. From small acorns……. Our History of ESV, the early days
  103. 103. Working with Asda and the early development of ESV
  104. 104. Our Investment in ESV and its returns………..
  105. 105. • Developing a Key Contact • Upscaling • Working smarter and being more pro-active
  106. 106. “I am really sorry but due to business priorities our team is unable to make the team day tomorrow morning”
  107. 107. ESV Now Looking to the future
  108. 108. Any Questions?
  109. 109. BEN DARLINGTON HEAD OF MEMBERSHIP SERVICES, BENEFACTO @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  110. 110. Making the most of employee volunteers today 23 October 2019
  111. 111. w: benefacto.org e: ben@benefacto.org m: 07872 522 560 127 © Benefacto Limited 2019 Employee Volunteers. Are they any use? get the role right: • ‘the grafters’ – food banks, soup kitchens, community gardens • ‘the charmers’ – social clubs, front-of-house tasks • ‘the coaches’ – employability, IT skills and languages potential to energise staff, service users and volunteers resources to free you up to do other important work Yes!
  112. 112. w: benefacto.org e: ben@benefacto.org m: 07872 522 560 128 © Benefacto Limited 2019 My talk today what should you expect from employee volunteering today? when are employee volunteers useful? When aren’t they? how can you get the best out of an employee volunteering programme? how can you get the best out of volunteers?
  113. 113. w: benefacto.org e: ben@benefacto.org m: 07872 522 560 129 © Benefacto Limited 2019 How has employee volunteering changed?  CSR isn’t just a tick-box exercise  companies have moved away from ‘paint and fix’ to longer-term programmes  more smaller companies are interested in investing in their communities  increasing emphasis on the benefits for volunteers  participation and perspective
  114. 114. w: benefacto.org e: ben@benefacto.org m: 07872 522 560 130 © Benefacto Limited 2019 Where are employee volunteers most effectively used?  grafter, charmer, coach roles  front-of-house, not back office: inspire them and reduce admin for you  “any comer” roles  capitalise on their energy, competence and desire to achieve something
  115. 115. w: benefacto.org e: ben@benefacto.org m: 07872 522 560 131 © Benefacto Limited 2019 When aren’t they useful? pro bono can be a big red herring – who does the project management? when you really need regular volunteers for jobs or projects that need the same people for more than a day or two if you require DBS checks, driving licenses or training
  116. 116. w: benefacto.org e: ben@benefacto.org m: 07872 522 560 132 © Benefacto Limited 2019 How to get the best out of Employee Volunteering 1: Understand what volunteers (and the companies they work for) want choice convenience impact skills – we need to redefine this
  117. 117. w: benefacto.org e: ben@benefacto.org m: 07872 522 560 133 © Benefacto Limited 2019 How to get the best out of Employee Volunteering 2. Be clear about what you want be in this for what it is, not what it might lead to distinguish between volunteering to create revenue and volunteering because it’s useful say no, say what you need
  118. 118. w: benefacto.org e: ben@benefacto.org m: 07872 522 560 134 © Benefacto Limited 2019 How to get the best out of Employee Volunteering 3. Relationships matter a single point of contact on both sides work with a CSR manager or similar, not a team leader looking for a summer group day use a broker address problems head on
  119. 119. w: benefacto.org e: ben@benefacto.org m: 07872 522 560 135 © Benefacto Limited 2019 How to get the best out of Employee Volunteering 4. Efficiency and expectations the right opportunity is key: regular, busy, consistent, minimal supervision make it easy to book: can tech work for you? have your Public Liability Insurance and Health and Safety Assessment done have a single point of contact at your organisation
  120. 120. CHELSIE RILEY ENGAGEMENT MANAGER, BUSINESS IN THE COMMUNITY @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  121. 121. THE PLACE FOR RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS
  122. 122. 08/11/2019 Membership Presentation WE EXIST TO INSPIRE AND ENGAGE BUSINESSES TO BECOME MORE RESPONSIBLE AND TACKLE SOME OF SOCIETY’S BIGGEST ISSUES
  123. 123. 08/11/2019 BUILDING STRONGER COMMUNITIES AND A BETTER SOCIETY
  124. 124. 08/11/201908/11/2019 • Employee engagement • Skills development • Future talent pipeline • Evidencing impact • Best practice • Brand awareness • Contributing to the community BUSINESS DRIVERS
  125. 125. 08/11/2019 • Ease • Time • Reduce admin • Network • Knowledge • Local understanding • Best practice • Evaluation WHY DO COMPANIES USE A BROKER?
  126. 126. 08/11/2019 BENEFITS TO COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS • New business support • Time and cost saving • Project management • Knowledge • Training • Evaluation
  127. 127. 08/11/2019 WHAT MAKES AN EFFECTIVE PARTNERSHIP: • Ground rules • A safe environment • Managed expectations • Good communication • Clear responsibilities • Mutually beneficial • Sustainability
  128. 128. 08/11/2019 • Not just donations – skills can be valuable long term • Don’t assume understanding • What makes you different? • Business benefits • Don’t underestimate the benefits • Manage your own expectations • Remember why businesses are in it • Heart strings • Celebrate • Create ongoing partnerships TOP TIPS FOR COMMUNITY GROUPS
  129. 129. 08/11/2019
  130. 130. @BITC JOIN THE NETWORK FOR CHANGE Chelsie.Riley@bitc.org.uk Membership Presentation
  131. 131. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum Q&A
  132. 132. JARINA CHOUDHURY VOLUNTEERING DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT, NCVO @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  133. 133. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum YOUR TAKE-AWAY THOUGHTS!
  134. 134. CHARLIE GILLIES TRAINEE VOLUNTEERING DEVELOPMENT POLICY OFFICER, NCVO @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  135. 135. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum POLICY UPDATE
  136. 136. BREXIT AND THE VOLUNTARY SECTOR/VOLUNTEERING • Will EU nationals be able to continue to volunteer in the UK? o Yes, if they have one of the following:  settled/pre-settled status  Euro temporary leave to remain (although only permitted to stay in the UK for three years after end of 2020)  a visa which doesn’t prevent them from volunteering. • Will UK nationals be able to continue to volunteer in the EU? o UK citizens are currently eligible to take part in several schemes through the European Voluntary Service. o The long-term UK membership of these schemes is still unknown, however the UK government has guaranteed to cover the cost of funding from these schemes should the UK leave the EU without a deal. o Outside of these schemes, without a collective agreement in place, this will largely come down to the view of the authorities of that specific nation. Check with UK-based embassy of that nation.
  137. 137. GOVERNMENT CONSULTATION: PREVENTIONS AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE WORKPLACE • During the summer the Government Equalities Office launched a consultation asking whether the current laws on protecting people from sexual harassment in the workplace are effective and set out some options for change. • One of the key proposals by the Government is to give volunteers the same Equality Act protections against sexual harassment that employees have, with the same recourse to employment tribunals. • NCVO ran its own consultation process with its members to get their views on these proposals. NCVO has now submitted its own response to the Government’s consultation – you can read this in full on the NCVO website.
  138. 138. THANK YOU TO OUR SPEAKERS! @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum
  139. 139. @NCVOvolunteers #VolForum PLEASE FILL IN YOUR EVALUATION FORMS
  140. 140. NCVO champions the voluntary sector and volunteer movement to create a better society. We connect, represent and support over 13,000 voluntary sector member organisations, from the smallest community groups to the largest charities. This helps our members and their millions of volunteers make the biggest difference to the causes they believe in. • Search for NCVO membership • Visit www.ncvo.org.uk/join • Email membership@ncvo.org.uk 156

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