Instructor Development
John Quincy Adams• "If your actions inspireothers to dream more, learnmore, do more and becomemore, you are a leader."• Ad...
INSTRUCTOR PRESENTATIONAs an instructor you are evaluatedcritically. Adapt to your audienceto avoid resentment andoppositi...
The first two minutes• You are an unknownquantity/quality for only 120seconds. After that, everythingyou say will be heard...
The opening statement• You have to maximize the impactof every word, syllable, andpause in your lead off statements.They n...
The first two minutesRespect and Rapport• Partner with audience• Respect their time• Show you prepared and rehearsed• Conn...
The first two minutesGrab their atttention• Grab the emotional anchors/passions & runwith it……• Attention grabbers• What i...
The first two minutesKilling your first impression• Start late• Open with an apology• Unrelated or inappropriate anecdote•...
Define your Audience• Rapport• Credibility• Teach, Involve and Entertain• Needs of audience– “Whats in it for Me?!”
Audience size• Proxemics– Harness the ability to access your audience– Interaction– Lecture positions– Demonstration capab...
Targeted Messaging• What do you want your audience toachieve?• Subconscious motivators• Existing skills knowledge and atti...
Presentation Style• Formal / Informal• Technical / Financial• Sales• Informative• Training Skills in three phases– Cogniti...
INFORMATION PROCESSINGMOTOR LEARNING• PH ASE S O F L E AR N I N G• C ognitive (PPC T =Static)–I nitial Phase• Associated (...
C ognitive Phase• G oal Setting:- self-defense - subject control -professional advancement• W hat do they want from traini...
Associated PhaseHere we take the basic motor skills learned in cognitiveand associate them with a variety of stimuli. Stud...
Associated Phase3. Match the skill with the appropriateStimulus :- S/R training - Explain ‘why’ theskill is performed4. Fe...
Autonomous Phase• This is the phase oflearning that we all strive for.It is a learning developmentphase that automatically...
“This will help you”• Structure you information as a benefit– Obtain skills– Power– Avoid the pain
Tie you message to audienceneeds and desires• TRANSITION– What is exciting, interesting ?– Immediate connection to audienc...
Tie you message to audienceneeds and desires• APPLICATION:– How can the audience use these skills orknowledge on the job t...
Tie you message to audienceneeds and desires• BENEFITS– What’s in it for me?– What will I gain?– Will this information:• M...
Tie you message to audienceneeds and desires• ANCHORS:– Hit the emotional, personal or psychologicalhot button– Where is t...
Ad u lt Le a rn in g The o ry– AD U L T L E AR N E R SAdult learning style inventorieswill manifest themselves inyour clas...
Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• VERBAL:They learn best bylistening. How it isexplained is importantto them. They willmost ...
Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• VISUAL:They best model well what they see.The demonstration, either live or onvideo tape w...
Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• TACTILE:These are the ‘touchy-feeley’ students thatmust do and feel eachstep of the skill ...
Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• HAPTIC:These are hands-onlearners. Doing theskill is the best fortheir learning process.
Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• NOTE:Learn to recognize the differences and understandthat the note-takers may give you mi...
TRANSFERRINGYOUR ENERGY TO YOURSTUDENTS•• Introduce yourself, your training and skills that validate your ability topresen...
ADULT VS. CHILD LEARNERS• Adults bring a wide range of experiences to alearning situation• Adults will evaluate new inform...
ADULT VS. CHILD LEARNERS• Adult learners are not inclined to be risktakers .• Adults will compensate for lessenedpsychomot...
DISTRACTING INSTRUCTORMANNERISMS• THE DYING WARRIOR Leaning on Lectern -appears exhausted – never moves• THE WALKIE - TALK...
Performance under StressConsiderations• Simplicity• Reaction time• Motor Skill Selection• Maximize technique/equipment per...
Wha t w e kn o w a b o u tS u rv iv a l S tre s s Re s e a rc hExcellentPerformancePoorArousal LevelLow Low115ComplexModer...
TRAINING S IMPLICITY• Once you have demonstrated that a skillor a piece of equipment is appropriate,students must learn it...
TRAINING S IMPLICITY• Every aspect of skill and equipment demonstrationand rehearsal should be directed toward clarity ofu...
Co m p e te n c e• T raining Sim plicity will result in com petence m orequickly.– Just how many repetitions are required ...
Co m p e te n c e• Does your training/equipmentdevelop technique whichperforms under the stress ofcombat?– How much stress...
Co n fid e n c e• C onfidence isachieved as physicalskills and equipm entuse achieve positiveexperiences both intraining a...
Co n fid e n c eConfidence will lowerstudents arousal levelwhen in the field.• W ill this equipm ent letm e down???- How q...
Wha t w e kn o w a b o u tS u rv iv a l S tre s s Re s e a rc hExcellentPerformancePoorArousal LevelLow Low115ComplexModer...
Lo w e r S tre s s = H ig he rPe rfo rm a n c e ?• I f this is true we shouldagain look at whatcauses stress.• O fficer is...
The Professional Instructor• If anybody could do it, it wouldn’ttake a professional to get it done.There is a long standin...
Instructor development 10.24.2012
Instructor development 10.24.2012
Instructor development 10.24.2012
Instructor development 10.24.2012
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Instructor development 10.24.2012

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  • As a starting point of this presentation let’s agree on what happens to the body under stress. We are talking about a SNS response to intense life and death stress situations – not a physical activity such as running or weight lifting. The stress we are outlining here is true survival stress. 115 bpm – is a nice calm but alert heart rate – it provides enough stimuli to keep us alert. At 115 we have all our capacity to process complex cognitive data and have fine motor control. As our SNS increases our heart rate it also begins to shut down other processes such as our cognitive processing ability. We lose the ability to easily process complex thoughts and fine motor skills become very difficult. When the heart rate increases to 175 and beyond our cognitive processes are limited to simple processes and our motor skills are reduced to simple gross activities. I believe the years of research have shown these responses to survival stress to be something we can all agree on in one form or another – is that correct???
  • As a starting point of this presentation let’s agree on what happens to the body under stress. We are talking about a SNS response to intense life and death stress situations – not a physical activity such as running or weight lifting. The stress we are outlining here is true survival stress. 115 bpm – is a nice calm but alert heart rate – it provides enough stimuli to keep us alert. At 115 we have all our capacity to process complex cognitive data and have fine motor control. As our SNS increases our heart rate it also begins to shut down other processes such as our cognitive processing ability. We lose the ability to easily process complex thoughts and fine motor skills become very difficult. When the heart rate increases to 175 and beyond our cognitive processes are limited to simple processes and our motor skills are reduced to simple gross activities. I believe the years of research have shown these responses to survival stress to be something we can all agree on in one form or another – is that correct???
  • Instructor development 10.24.2012

    1. 1. Instructor Development
    2. 2. John Quincy Adams• "If your actions inspireothers to dream more, learnmore, do more and becomemore, you are a leader."• Adams was the 6thpresident of the USA
    3. 3. INSTRUCTOR PRESENTATIONAs an instructor you are evaluatedcritically. Adapt to your audienceto avoid resentment andopposition. Teaching is an ARTas well as a science andcompetence in presentation iscritical.
    4. 4. The first two minutes• You are an unknownquantity/quality for only 120seconds. After that, everythingyou say will be heard in thecontext of the impression of thefirst two minutes.
    5. 5. The opening statement• You have to maximize the impactof every word, syllable, andpause in your lead off statements.They need to be works of art –compelling to the extremedegree. To minimize theimportance of preparing a solidopening statement is topotentially short circuit yourentire topic.• Set the tone.
    6. 6. The first two minutesRespect and Rapport• Partner with audience• Respect their time• Show you prepared and rehearsed• Connect and empathize• Eye contact
    7. 7. The first two minutesGrab their atttention• Grab the emotional anchors/passions & runwith it……• Attention grabbers• What is the ‘opener’?– Current Event– Humor– Ancedotal– Real life– Statistics
    8. 8. The first two minutesKilling your first impression• Start late• Open with an apology• Unrelated or inappropriate anecdote• Slow momentum or energy• Technical difficulties / equipment failure
    9. 9. Define your Audience• Rapport• Credibility• Teach, Involve and Entertain• Needs of audience– “Whats in it for Me?!”
    10. 10. Audience size• Proxemics– Harness the ability to access your audience– Interaction– Lecture positions– Demonstration capability
    11. 11. Targeted Messaging• What do you want your audience toachieve?• Subconscious motivators• Existing skills knowledge and attitudes• Want vs need to know
    12. 12. Presentation Style• Formal / Informal• Technical / Financial• Sales• Informative• Training Skills in three phases– Cognitive– Associative– Autonomous
    13. 13. INFORMATION PROCESSINGMOTOR LEARNING• PH ASE S O F L E AR N I N G• C ognitive (PPC T =Static)–I nitial Phase• Associated (PPC T = F luid)–I nterm ediate Phase• Autonom ous (PPC T =D ynam ic)– Advanced Phase
    14. 14. C ognitive Phase• G oal Setting:- self-defense - subject control -professional advancement• W hat do they want from training?- personal empowerment - skillsupgrade- fighting skills - weapons use• G oal Setting within training- purpose of the skill / technique - motivationto accomplish skill• How personal/ individual goals integratewith the system taught- goals of the system - research - discipline- standardization• B asic M ovem ent C om ponents: (TactileLearning)1. Stance necessary for balance, power, etc. (naturalaction stance)2. Landmarks for beginning , middle and end of skill3. Combine landmarks and stances
    15. 15. Associated PhaseHere we take the basic motor skills learned in cognitiveand associate them with a variety of stimuli. Studentsmodel after instructor, the do the reps, they associatethe material into a motor pattern.1. Teach basic Skill- cognition2. Develop Conscious and Consistent Skill- Skill review to measure consciousinitiation of skill- Measure skill consistency; sameway every time
    16. 16. Associated Phase3. Match the skill with the appropriateStimulus :- S/R training - Explain ‘why’ theskill is performed4. Feedback mechanisms- Questions- Visualization- Change the environment- Incremental correction- Learning Styles
    17. 17. Autonomous Phase• This is the phase oflearning that we all strive for.It is a learning developmentphase that automaticallytakes control in a reactionarysituation. Moving smoothlythrough your skills withoutthe hesitation we see in theAssociated phase.• Though thousands ofrepetitions of skill practiceare an important step towardthis phase, variables willhave a dramatic influence onsudden assault reaction time• Those variables aremotivation to learn,competence of instructionand Dynamic SimulationTraining
    18. 18. “This will help you”• Structure you information as a benefit– Obtain skills– Power– Avoid the pain
    19. 19. Tie you message to audienceneeds and desires• TRANSITION– What is exciting, interesting ?– Immediate connection to audience– Tell an example story or show an examplephoto or video (entertainment value)
    20. 20. Tie you message to audienceneeds and desires• APPLICATION:– How can the audience use these skills orknowledge on the job today?– Relevant examples of skill application– Where an when to apply the concept
    21. 21. Tie you message to audienceneeds and desires• BENEFITS– What’s in it for me?– What will I gain?– Will this information:• Make my life/job easier• Safety, Litigation, laws• More money• Save time
    22. 22. Tie you message to audienceneeds and desires• ANCHORS:– Hit the emotional, personal or psychologicalhot button– Where is the ‘buy in’ point for the customer?– Shock factor; where is the example, photo orvideo that will impact the customer?– Anchors are best established through learningstyles.
    23. 23. Ad u lt Le a rn in g The o ry– AD U L T L E AR N E R SAdult learning style inventorieswill manifest themselves inyour classes. You may thinkthat the person who isfidgeting, daydreaming ordoodling in your class is eithera “slow” learner or resistant toyour teaching. Don’t writethem off too soon, they may bewaiting for their style oflearning to come up and maybe your most dynamic student.
    24. 24. Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• VERBAL:They learn best bylistening. How it isexplained is importantto them. They willmost often be your‘list makers’ in classwhile you lecture.
    25. 25. Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• VISUAL:They best model well what they see.The demonstration, either live or onvideo tape will benefit them most.
    26. 26. Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• TACTILE:These are the ‘touchy-feeley’ students thatmust do and feel eachstep of the skill to getit right. Like theclicks of a ratchet, ifyou leave out one stepthey will not learn it.
    27. 27. Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• HAPTIC:These are hands-onlearners. Doing theskill is the best fortheir learning process.
    28. 28. Ad u lt Le a rn in g S ty le s• NOTE:Learn to recognize the differences and understandthat the note-takers may give you minimalphysical skill performance. Offer a balancedmixture such as keeping the writing board handywhen doing physical skills. Understand you maynot be playing to their strength when they seemnot to learn.
    29. 29. TRANSFERRINGYOUR ENERGY TO YOURSTUDENTS•• Introduce yourself, your training and skills that validate your ability topresent the program and explain your personal commitment to the topic• Speak Loudly and Clearly• Keep Eye Contact; Scan the room, avoid looking at the same people• Modulate voice: Tone and Level to reflect your own feelings• Use gestures to enhance the message. Be careful not to becomedistracting to the students. Too much movement can split a student’sattention.• Vary your teaching methods to keep the environment exciting.• Physical practice needs to be integrated with enthusiastic corrections thatmotivate energetic practice as well as correcting technique. Inject correctionsevery 7-10 minutes or less.
    30. 30. ADULT VS. CHILD LEARNERS• Adults bring a wide range of experiences to alearning situation• Adults will evaluate new information in light oftheir own experience:Thus, adults must integrate new knowledgewith previous experiences and knowledge.• Because of the above information, newknowledge that conflicts with previousknowledge will be integrated more slowly(learning different styles).• Adult learners have an intuitive (feeling) side.
    31. 31. ADULT VS. CHILD LEARNERS• Adult learners are not inclined to be risktakers .• Adults will compensate for lessenedpsychomotor skill with fewer and slowerattempts.• Above all, Adult learners are in classesdemanding knowledge that is useful to themin their life circumstances.
    32. 32. DISTRACTING INSTRUCTORMANNERISMS• THE DYING WARRIOR Leaning on Lectern -appears exhausted – never moves• THE WALKIE - TALKIE The Pacer whonever stands still• THE CHAINED ELEPHANT Stands in one positionshifting weight from one foot to the other• THE SWORDSMAN Duels with the pointer or laser• THECHANGE COUNTER Jingles Change in pocketswhile lecturing• THE HEADMASTER Scratches head /play with hair continuously• THE ‘UM-AH’ Uses filler words continually
    33. 33. Performance under StressConsiderations• Simplicity• Reaction time• Motor Skill Selection• Maximize technique/equipment performance
    34. 34. Wha t w e kn o w a b o u tS u rv iv a l S tre s s Re s e a rc hExcellentPerformancePoorArousal LevelLow Low115ComplexModerateSimpleFineComplexGross145ModerateSimpleComplexGross175SimpleGrossCognitive ProcessesMotor ControlHeart Rate
    35. 35. TRAINING S IMPLICITY• Once you have demonstrated that a skillor a piece of equipment is appropriate,students must learn it’s operation quicklyto enhance motivation and increasesurvivability.• Training Simplicity must be relative toskills performed (techniques) and theequipment used. Both need to considerhow the body reacts under stress,resulting in system and product design. Ifthe design is based upon easy to learntechniques, then skill levels are quickly
    36. 36. TRAINING S IMPLICITY• Every aspect of skill and equipment demonstrationand rehearsal should be directed toward clarity ofunderstanding and ease of use.• Training Simplicity can best be accomplished withskills and equipment that rely on basic motor andcognitive skills to master: Simple cognition & Grossmotor skills and function with considerations suchas reaction time and in the area of impact weaponsphysics such as mass & velocity.• To insure dependability, skills and equipmentshould operated consistently under a variety of
    37. 37. Co m p e te n c e• T raining Sim plicity will result in com petence m orequickly.– Just how many repetitions are required to write oroverwrite neuro learning pathways & overcomefrustration ?– How much training time are you budgeted for?– Minutes or Hours of training to become competent willresult in a high level of competence in a student.– Days to become competent with a skill or equipment mayresult in the same high level of competence in a student,but at what expense?• C om petence m ust be achieved and retained.– Can your skills and equipment once mastered, bemaintained with minimal follow-up/remedial training?
    38. 38. Co m p e te n c e• Does your training/equipmentdevelop technique whichperforms under the stress ofcombat?– How much stress inoculationtime do you have to insureperformance under stress?– Are your skills andequipment truly applicablefor dynamic applications?– Dynamic training oftendeteriorates when it is notbased on actual field
    39. 39. Co n fid e n c e• C onfidence isachieved as physicalskills and equipm entuse achieve positiveexperiences both intraining and in thefield.• A students confidencein his/her product willresult in theirconfidence to performin a survival stress
    40. 40. Co n fid e n c eConfidence will lowerstudents arousal levelwhen in the field.• W ill this equipm ent letm e down???- How quickly can I performthe skill or use thisequipment for survival?• I m proved cognition- Reaction timeawareness- Decision making skills
    41. 41. Wha t w e kn o w a b o u tS u rv iv a l S tre s s Re s e a rc hExcellentPerformancePoorArousal LevelLow Low115ComplexModerateSimpleFineComplexGross145ModerateSimpleComplexGross175SimpleGrossCognitive ProcessesMotor ControlHeart Rate
    42. 42. Lo w e r S tre s s = H ig he rPe rfo rm a n c e ?• I f this is true we shouldagain look at whatcauses stress.• O fficer is not confidentin theirability/equipm ent- T raining tim e / intensity?- Skill C om plexity notcom patible with stresslevel?– E quipm ent failure understress: (T he car stopscenario)– O perator error resultingin your inability toaccess your equipm ent.– E quipm ent R etention
    43. 43. The Professional Instructor• If anybody could do it, it wouldn’ttake a professional to get it done.There is a long standing fraternity ofothers who came before you. You deal withthese energies just as they did. It has neverbeen easy and you are in good company.Dr. Paul Whitesell

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