Managing the British woodland ecosystem: a case study of Nap Wood Chesterton Community College GCSE Geography
Where is Nap Wood? <ul><li>Nap Wood is a small area of woodland approximately 4 miles south of Tunbridge Wells. </li></ul>...
How is the ecosystem structured? <ul><li>There are 4 layers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Upper canopy – older trees, mainly oak,...
Managing Nap Wood <ul><li>The National Trust manage Nap Wood. </li></ul><ul><li>Very little management is needed as there ...
Does the ‘leave-alone’ policy work? <ul><li>Studies have been undertaken at Ashdown Forest, about 5 miles to the west of N...
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Nap Wood Introductory Presentation

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Nap Wood Introductory Presentation

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Nap Wood Introductory Presentation

  1. 1. Managing the British woodland ecosystem: a case study of Nap Wood Chesterton Community College GCSE Geography
  2. 2. Where is Nap Wood? <ul><li>Nap Wood is a small area of woodland approximately 4 miles south of Tunbridge Wells. </li></ul><ul><li>It is in a relatively densely populated area. </li></ul><ul><li>Access is from the main road – the A267 – are there is very little parking available so few people visit the wood. </li></ul>
  3. 3. How is the ecosystem structured? <ul><li>There are 4 layers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Upper canopy – older trees, mainly oak, beech, chestnut and silver birch trees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lower canopy – younger trees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shrub layer – mostly holly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ground layer – mosses, bluebells, brambles, honeysuckle, bracken and herbs </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Managing Nap Wood <ul><li>The National Trust manage Nap Wood. </li></ul><ul><li>Very little management is needed as there is little human impact on the wood – the National Trust’s role is to protect the wood. </li></ul><ul><li>The National Trust operates a ‘leave-alone’ policy – when trees fall down, they are left to rot where they lie. This allows the nutrient cycle to operate naturally and fully. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Does the ‘leave-alone’ policy work? <ul><li>Studies have been undertaken at Ashdown Forest, about 5 miles to the west of Nap Wood. </li></ul><ul><li>What does the data show? </li></ul>

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