Couch Potato

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Couch Potato

  1. 1. Couch Potato A conceptual design by Jimmy Chen and Alan Viverette Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Design Challenge: To persuade at least five people to create a stronger habit of eating vegetables every day. Intervention Begins: May 22 Intervention Ends: May 27
  2. 2. Couch Potato <ul><li>Persuasive Purpose </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To persuade five people to eat more vegetables every day. </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu <ul><li>Industrial Design </li></ul>
  3. 3. User Description <ul><ul><li>Stanford undergrads who eat the majority of their meals in Lakeside Dining, a campus dining hall </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Their dietary choices are constrained by what the dining hall offers on a given day </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dining halls always offer a variety of vegetable options, but the offering differs from day to day </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eating in the dining hall is inherently social </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  4. 4. Couch Potato Storyboard Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Subjects eat their meals in the dining hall and eat the vegetables they had previously read about. That night, the subject responds to an email survey about which of the vegetable options he/she ate. Every morning, the subject is tagged in a Facebook note listing the vegetables to be offered in the dining hall that day. We will include a humorous picture of the daily vegetables sitting on a couch. The notes end by requesting comments about which of the vegetables sounds especially appealing, or which vegetables are most exciting.
  5. 5. Prototype Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  6. 6. Features/Functionality <ul><ul><li>Users will know which vegetables are offered ahead of time, and can then actively search for their favorites and plan ahead of time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some of my users will probably know each other, so there could be a social influencing effect to eat more vegetables </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Users who comment on the Facebook note about their favorites may influence others to try those vegetables </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  7. 7. Theoretical Justifications <ul><ul><li>This intervention, at its root, targets the “smallest behavior that matters” – knowing which vegetables are offered. You must know what the choices are before you can choose one. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People often make their dietary decisions in a second in the dining hall – this promotes poor attention to healthy eating. Instead, allowing people to start thinking about their food choices earlier may help people make wiser dietary decisions </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  8. 8. Shortcomings of Design <ul><ul><li>Medium : some people do not check Facebook every day, and some might not check it before going into the dining hall for a meal. Email has its benefits too, but the social element of Facebook presents unique advantages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Metrics : it will be difficult to track what progress, if any, this intervention makes. Asking people to record their food choices every day would be overly bothersome and frustrating. Asking people to record their food choices at the end of the week means that they might forget what they ate. </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  9. 9. Expansion - What else is possible? <ul><ul><li>Other form factors or ID possibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other mediums: Twitter? SMS? Email? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other features and interactions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Iterate on the social features – perhaps some sort of competition or additional communication between the users about vegetable choices? </li></ul></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  10. 10. Next Steps in Design Process <ul><ul><li>Find subjects. Look for people living in dorms served by Lakeside Dining </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Implement. Check the Stanford Dining website daily and create new Facebook notes each day corresponding to the food offerings. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Iterate as needed. Fix aspects of the study that are not working. </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu

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