Hnp

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  • The spine is divided into several sections. The cervical vertebrae make up the neck. The thoracic vertebrae comprise the chest section and have ribs attached. The lumbar vertebrae are the remaining vertebrae below the last thoracic bone and the top of the sacrum. The sacral vertebrae are caged within the bones of the pelvis, and the coccyx represents the terminal vertebrae or vestigial tail.
  • The spine is made of bones (vertebrae) separated by soft cushions (intervertebral discs).
  • Herniated nucleus pulposus is a condition in which part or all of the soft, gelatinous central portion of an intervertebral disk is forced through a weakened part of the disk, resulting in back pain and nerve root irritation.
  • The sciatic nerve is located in the back of the leg. It supplies the muscles of the back of the knee and lower leg. The sciatic nerve also provides sensation to the back of the thigh, part of the lower leg, and the sole of the foot. Partial damage to the nerve may demonstrate weakness of knee flexion (bending), weakness of foot movements, difficulty bending the foot inward (inversion), or bending the foot down (plantar flexion). A person's reflexes may be abnormal, with weak or absent ankle-jerk reflex. Several different tests can be performed to find the cause of sciatic nerve dysfunction.
  • hen the soft, gelatinous central portion of an intervertebral disk is forced through a weakened part of a disk, it is a condition known as a slipped disk. Most herniation takes place in the lumbar area of the spine, and it is one of the most common causes of lower back pain. The mainstay of treatment for herniated disks is an initial period of rest with pain and anti-inflammatory medications followed by physical therapy. If pain and symptoms persist, surgery to remove the herniated portion of the intervertebral disk is recommended.
  • The spinal cord ends in the lumbar area and continues through the vertebral canal as spinal nerves. Because of its resemblance to a horse's tail, the collection of these nerves at the end of the spinal cord is called the cauda equina. These nerves send and receive messages to and from the lower limbs and pelvic organs.
  • Hnp

    1. 1. HERNIATED NUCLEUS PULPOSUS Michelle A. Suguitan, RN, MSN
    2. 2. <ul><li>THE SPINAL COLUMN </li></ul>
    3. 8. SLIPPED DISC <ul><li>The disks between the vertebrae are liable to displacement when put under strain. Heavy lifting may produce forces which cause a lumbar intervertebral disk to move out of place (&quot;slipped disk&quot;). </li></ul>
    4. 11. <ul><li>A herniated disc occurs most often in the lumbar region of the spine especially at the L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels (L = Lumbar, S = Sacral). This is because the lumbar spine carries most of the body's weight. People between the ages of 30 and 50 appear to be vulnerable because the elasticity and water content of the nucleus decreases with age </li></ul>
    5. 12. <ul><li>The progression to an actual HNP varies from slow to sudden onset of symptoms. There are four stages: (1) disc protrusion (2) prolapsed disc (3) disc extrusion (4) sequestered disc. Stages 1 and 2 are referred to as incomplete, where 3 and 4 are complete herniations. Pain resulting from herniation may be combined with a radiculopathy, which means neurological deficit. The deficit may include sensory changes (i.e. tingling, numbness) and/or motor changes (i.e. weakness, reflex loss). These changes are caused by nerve compression created by pressure from interior disc material. </li></ul>
    6. 13. <ul><li>Progression of Herniated Disc </li></ul>
    7. 14. <ul><li>The extremities affected are dependent upon the vertebral level at which the HNP occurred. Consider the following examples: Cervical - Pain in the neck, shoulders, and arms
 Thoracic - Pain radiates into the chest
 Lumbar - Pain extends into the buttocks, thighs, legs </li></ul>
    8. 15. <ul><li>Cauda Equina Syndrome occurs from a central disc herniation and is serious requiring immediate surgical intervention. The symptoms include bilateral leg pain, loss of perianal sensation (anus), paralysis of the bladder, and weakness of the anal sphincter. </li></ul>
    9. 16. Diagnosis of a Herniated Disc <ul><li>The spine is examined with the patient laying down and standing. Due to muscle spasm, a loss of normal spinal curvature may be noted. Radicular pain (inflammation of a spinal nerve) may increase when pressure is applied to the affected spinal level. </li></ul>
    10. 17. <ul><li>A Lasegue test, also known as Straight-leg Raising Test, is performed. The patient lies down, the knee is extended, and the hip is flexed. If pain is aggravated or produced, it is an indication the lower lumbosacral nerve roots are inflamed. </li></ul>
    11. 18. <ul><li>Other neurological tests are performed to determine loss of sensation and/or motor function. Abnormal reflexes are noted as these changes may indicate the location of the herniation. </li></ul>
    12. 19. <ul><li>Radiographs are helpful, but Computed Axial Tomography (CAT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides more detail. The MRI is the best method enabling the physician to see the soft spinal tissues unseen in a conventional x-ray. </li></ul>

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